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Full text of "University of New Haven Graduate School Catalog, 1991-93"

Digitized by tine Internet Archive 

in 2010 witii funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/universityofne199193univ 



University of New Haven 



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GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 

CATALOG 

1991-93 



300 Orange Avenue 

West Haven, Conn. 06516 

(203) 932-7000 

or 1-800-DIAL-UNH 

Graduate Admissions: (203) 932-7133 



This catalog supersedes all previous bul- 
letins, catalogs and brochures published by 
the Graduate School and describes academic 
programs to be offered beginning in fall 
1991. Graduate students admitted to the uni- 
versity for the fall of 1991 and thereafter are 
bound by the regulations published in this 
catalog. 

The University of New Haven is commit- 
ted to affirmative action and to a policy 
which provides for equal opportunity in 
employment, advancement, admission, edu- 
cational opportunity and administration of 
financial aid to all persons on the basis of 
individual merit. This policy is administered 
without regard to race, color, national ori- 
gin, age, sex, religion or disabilities not relat- 
ed to performance. It is the policy of the 
University of New Haven not to discrimi- 
nate on the basis of sex in its admission, 
educational programs, activities or employ- 
ment policies as required by Title IX of the 
1972 Educational Amendments. This school 
is authorized under federal law to enroll 
non-immigrant alien students. 

Inquiries regarding affirmative action, 
equal opportunity and Title IX may be 
directed to the director of equal opportunity. 

Every effort has been made to ensure that 
the information contained in this publication 
is accurate and current as of the date of pub- 



lication; however, the university cannot be 
held responsible for typographical errors or 
omissions that may have occurred. 

Volume XIV No. 9 June 1991 

The University of Nezv Haven is published 
nine times a year in February (2), April, May 
(2), June, July , and November (2) by the 
University of New Haven, 300 Orange 
Avenue, West Haven, CT 06516. Second 
class postage paid at New Haven, CT, publi- 
cation number USPS 423-410. 
Postmaster: please send form 3579 to 
Office of Public Relations, University of 
New Haven, P.O. Box 9605, New Haven, 
CT 06535-0605. 



The university reserves the right, at 
any time, to make whatever changes 
may be deemed necessary in admission 
requirements, fees, charges, tuition, 
policies, regulations and academic pro- 
grams prior to the start of any class, 
term, semester, trimester or session. All 
such changes are effective at such times 
as the proper authorities determine and 
may apply not only to prospective stu- 
dents but also to those already enrolled 
in the university. 



ACADEMIC 
PROGRAMS 



Accounting (M.S.) 

Business Administration (M.B.A.) 

Business Administration/Industrial 

Engineering (M.B.A. /M.S.I. E.) 
Business Administration /Public 

Administration (M.B.A. /M.P.A.) 
Community Psychology (M.A.) 
Computer and Information Science (M.S.) 
Criminal Justice (M.S.) 
Electrical Engineering (M.S.E.E.) 
Environmental Engineering (M.S.) 
Environmental Science (M.S.) 
Executive M.B.A. 
Fire Science (M.S.) 
Forensic Science (M.S.) 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

(M.B.A. concentration) 
Industrial Engineering (M.S.I. E.) 
Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology (M.A.) 
Industrial Relations (M.S.) 
Management Systems (Sc.D.) 
Mechanical Engineering (M.S.M.E.) 
Occupational Safety and Health 

Management (M.S.) 
Operations Research (M.S.) 
Public Administration (M.P.A.) 
Taxation (M.S.) 
Tourism and Travel Administration 

(M.B.A. concentration) 



Senior Professional 
Certificates 

Accounting (3 options) 

Applications of Psychology 

Computer and Information Science 

Finance 

General Management 

Health Care Management 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 

Human Resources Management 

International Business 

Marketing (2 options) 

Occupational Safety and Health 

Management 
Public Management (2 options) 
Public Safety Management 
Taxation (2 options) 
Telecommunication Management 

Professional Certificates 

Arson Investigation 

Civil Engineering Design 

Criminal Justice/Security Management 

Fire Science /Administration and 

Technology 
Forensic Science/Advanced 

Investigation 
Forensic Science/Criminalistics 
Forensic Science /Fire Science 
Health Care Management 
Human Resources Management 
Industrial Hygiene 
International Relations 
Legal Studies 
Logistics 

Logistics / Advanced 
Long-Term Health Care 
Mental Retardation Services 
Occupational Safety 
Public Administration Contents on page 7 



Summer Term 1991 
Fall Term 1991 



Winter Term 1992 



Spring Term 1992 



Summer Term 1992 
Fall Term 1992 



Winter Term 1993 



CALENDAR 

1991-93 

Monday, July 8 - Tuesday, Aug. 20 



Monday, Sept. 9 - Saturday, Dec. 14 

Last day to petition for January 

graduation 
Holiday (Thanksgiving), no classes 

Commencement 



Tuesday, Oct. 15 

Monday, Nov. 25 - 

Saturday, Nov. 30 

Saturday, Jan. 18, 1992 



Thursday, Jan. 2 - Wednesday, April 1 

HoUday (M.L. King Day), no classes — 

a make-up class will be scheduled 
Last day to petition for June graduation 
Commencement 

Monday, April 6 - Saturday, July 4 

Holiday (Good Friday), no classes — 
a make-up class will be scheduled 

HoUday (Memorial Day), no classes — 
a make-up class will be scheduled 

Hohday (Independence Day), no classes 
— a make-up class will be scheduled 

Monday, July 13 - Tuesday, Aug. 25 

Monday, Sept. 14 - Saturday, Dec. 19 

Last day to petition for January 

graduation 
Holiday (Thanksgiving), no classes 



Monday, Jan. 20 

Monday, March 2 

TBA 



Friday, April 17 

Monday, May 25 

Saturday, July 4 



Commencement 



Thursday, Oct. 15 
Monday, Nov. 23 - 
Saturday, Nov. 28 
Saturday, Jan. 16, 1992 



Monday, Jan. 4 - Saturday, April 3 

HoUday (M.L. King Day), no classes — 

a make-up class will be scheduled Monday, Jan. 18 

Last day to petition for June graduation Monday, March 1 
Commencement TBA 



Spring Term 1993 



Monday, April 5 - Saturday, July 3 

Holiday (Good Friday), no classes — 

a make-up class will be scheduled Friday, April 9 

Holiday (Memorial Day), no classes — 

a make-up class will be scheduled Monday, May 31 



Summer Term 1993 Monday, July 12 - Tuesday, Aug. 24 



CONTENTS 



Calendar 5 

The Graduate School 11 

Admission 13 

Interna tional Student Admission 14 

Academic Policies 17 

Tuition and Fees 25 

Financial Assistance 26 

Cooperative Education 28 

Student Services 29 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS 
Doctor of Science Degree 

Management Systems 66 

Master's Degree Programs 

Accounting 35 

Financial Accounting specialization 36 

Managerial Accounting specialization... 36 

Taxation specialization 36 

Business Administration 36 

Accounting concentration 38 

Business Policy and Strategy 

concentration 39 

Computer and Information Science 

concentration 39 

Finance concentration 39 

Health Care Management 

concentration 40 

Health Care Marketing concentration.... 41 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 

concentration 60 



8 

Human Resources Management 

concentration 41 

International Business concentration 41 

Logistics concentration 42 

Long-Term Health Care concentration .. 42 
Management and Organization 

concentration 42 

Management Science concentration 43 

Marketing concentration 43 

Operations Research concentration 43 

Public Relations concentration 44 

Telecommunications concentration 44 

Tourism and Travel Administration 

concentration 76 

Business Administration/Industrial 

Engineering (dual degree) 44 

Business Administration/Public 

Administration (dual degree) 45 

Community Psychology 46 

Community-Clinical Services 

concentration 47 

Mental Retardation Services 

concentration 48 

Program Development concentration .... 48 

Computer and Information Science 48 

Applications Software concentration 50 

Management Information Systems 

concentration 50 

Systems Software concentration 51 

Criminal Justice 51 

Correctional Counseling concentration . 52 
Criminal Justice Management 

concentration 52 

Security Management concentration 52 

Electrical Engineering 53 

Environmental Engineering 54 

Environmental Science 55 

Executive M.B.A 56 

Fire Science 57 

Adminstration concentration 58 

Technology concentration 58 

Forensic Science 59 

Advanced Investigation concentration .. 60 

Criminalistics concentration 60 

Fire Science concentration 60 



Hotel and Restaurant Management 

(M.B.A. concentration) 60 

Industrial Engineering 61 

Industrial/Organizational Psychology 63 

Industrial-Personnel Psychology 

concentration 65 

Organizational Psychology 

concentration 65 

Industrial Relations 65 

Mechanical Engineering 69 

Occupational Safety 

and Health Management 70 

Industrial Hygiene concentration 72 

Operations Research 72 

Public Administration 73 

City Management concentration 73 

Health Care Management 

concentration 74 

Long-Term Health Care concentration .. 74 

Personnel and Labor Relations 

concentration 74 

Taxation 75 

Corporate Taxation specialization 76 

Public Taxation specialization 76 

Tourism and Travel Administration 

(M.B.A. concentration) 76 

Senior Professional Certificates 

Accounting (3 options) 78 

Applications of Psychology 79 

Computer and Information Science 79 

Finance 79 

General Management 80 

Health Care Management 80 

Hotel and Restaurant Management 81 

Human Resources Management 81 

International Business 81 

Marketing (2 options) 81 

Occupational Safety 

and Health Management 82 

Public Management (2 options) 82 

Public Safety Management 83 

Taxation (2 options) 83 

Telecommunication Management 84 



Professional Certificates 

Arson Investigation 85 

Civil Engineering Design 85 

Criminal Justice /Security Management 85 

Fire Science Administration and 

Technology 86 

Forensic Science/ Advanced Investigation .. 86 

Forensic Science/CriminalisHcs 86 

Forensic Science/Fire Science 87 

Health Care Management 87 

Human Resources Management 87 

Industrial Hygiene 88 

International Relations 88 

Legal Studies 88 

Logistics 89 

Logistics /Advanced 89 

Long-Term Health Care 89 

Mental Retardation Services 90 

Occupational Safety 90 

PubUc Administration 90 

Course Descriptions 93 

Board, Administration and Faculty 141 

Index 155 

Campus Map back of book 

Application Form back of book 

Recommendation Forms back of book 

Transcript Request Form back of book 



■ f"?^*"^'^^ 




11 



THE 

GRADUATE 

SCHOOL 



The University of New Haven is a pri- 
vate, coeducational university with a con- 
temporary and innovative view of higher 
education. 

The graduate programs at the University 
of New Haven offer students the opportuni- 
ty to enhance skills and knowledge for 
already-chosen careers in highly technical 
and competitive fields. Other students 
studying at the graduate level are preparing 
to enter new careers or are planning to con- 
tinue their education at the doctoral level. 
Most graduate programs offer multiple 
areas of specialization; flexibility in elective 
choices; opportunities for field work, intern- 
ships, independent study and research; and 
the possibility of combining a cooperative 
education work experience as part of the 
curriculum. 

The university's faculty is outstanding in 
its combination of highly qualified, full-time 
academics (88 percent of whom hold doctor- 
al or terminal degrees from a broad spec- 
trum of prestigious institutions) and 
part-time faculty members employed in area 
businesses and professions who bring, in 
addition to academic degrees, practical 
insight and experience to the classroom. 

The Graduate School offers a doctoral 
degree in management systems and more 
than 20 master's degree programs. Classes 
are offered at locations across Connecticut. 

The main campus in West Haven offers 
all academic programs. At off-campus loca- 



tions in Clinton, Groton-New London, 
Middletown, Stamford, Trumbull, Walling- 
ford and Waterbury graduate courses are 
offered in subjects leading to master's 
degrees in business admirustration, comput- 
er and information science and other 
programs. 

Graduate School courses are offered on a 
13-week trimester schedule, beginning in 
September, January and April. A condensed 
summer term is also offered. Most graduate 
courses are scheduled during the early 
evenings and on Saturdays to meet the 
needs of part-time, employed students. 

Accreditation 

The University of New Haven is a coedu- 
cational, nonsectarian, independent institu- 
tion of higher learning, chartered by the 
General Assembly of the State of Cormecticut. 

The University of New Haven is accredit- 
ed by the New England Association of 
Schools and Colleges, Inc., a nongovernmen- 
tal, nationally recognized organization 
whose affiliated institutions include elemen- 
tary schools through collegiate institutions 
offering postgraduate instruction. 

Accreditation of an institution by the 
New England Association indicates that it 
meets or exceeds criteria for the assessment 
of institutional quality periodically applied 
through a peer group review process. An 
accredited school or college is one which has 



12 



available the necessary resources to achieve 
its stated purposes through appropriate 
educational programs, is substantially doing 
so, and gives reasonable evidence that it will 
continue to do so in the foreseeable future. 
Institutional integrity is also addressed 
through accreditation. 

Accreditation by the New England 
Association is not partial but applies to the 
institution as a whole. As such, it is not a 
guarantee of the quality of every course or 
program offered, or the competence of indi- 
vidual graduates. Rather, it provides reason- 
able assurance about the quality of 
opportunities available to students who 
attend the institution. 

The university holds membership in the 
Council of Graduate Schools, the North- 
eastern Association of Graduate Schools, the 
Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences, the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology, the American Council on 
Education, the Association of American 
Colleges, the National Association of 
Independent Colleges and Universities, the 
College Entrance Examination Board and is 
a member of other regional and national 
professional organizations. 

History 

The University of New Haven was 
founded in 1920 as the New Haven YMCA 
Junior College, a branch of Northeastern 
University. The college became New Haven 
College in 1926 by an act of the Connecticut 
General Assembly. The college moved to its 
current location in 1960. 

In 1969, New Haven College added the 
Graduate School to its estabhshed baccalau- 
reate programs. Initially offering programs 
in business administration and industrial 
engineering, the Graduate School expanded 
rapidly. Today a doctoral program, more 
than 20 master's programs and additional 
courses have pushed graduate enrollment to 
more than 2,500. 

On the fiftieth anniversary of the found- 
ing of the college in 1970, New Haven 
College became the University of New 
Haven, reflecting the increased scope and 



the diversity of academic programs offered. 

Today, the university offers more than 100 
graduate and undergraduate degree pro- 
grams in six schools: the Graduate School; 
the School of Arts and Sciences; the School 
of Business; the School of Engineering; the 
School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism 
Administration; and the School of Profes- 
sional Studies and Continuing Education. 

New Haven 

The University of New Haven is located 
in south central Connecticut, between New 
York City and Boston, Massachusetts. 
Situated on a West Haven hillside overlook- 
ing Long Island Sound, the campus is easily 
accessible by car (from Interstate 95), bus 
and train service as well as local airports. 

New Haven, just ten minutes away from 
the campus, is a city where arts and cultural 
activities flourish and coexist with science 
and business. Settled in 1638 and rich in his- 
tory and heritage, New Haven is proud of 
its past, prouder of its present and actively 
planning for its future. The city is a manu- 
facturing center, a deep-water harbor, a 
major art center, a college town with seven 
colleges and universities in the immediate 
area, and the "Gateway to New England." 

New Haven is home to the Shubert, 
Palace, Long Wharf and Yale Repertory the- 
aters; the New Haven Symphony; and a 
number of museums including the Peabody 
Museum of Natural History, the Eli Whitney 
Museum, the Yale Center for British Art, and 
the oldest university gallery in the western 
hemisphere, the Yale Art Gallery. 

Campus 

The university's 70-acre campus contains 
20 buildings that house modern laboratory 
and library facilities, the latest computer 
equipment, an athletic complex and residen- 
tial facilities. 

The Main Campus includes administra- 
tion and classroom facilities in Ellis C. 
Maxcy Hall (the main administration build- 
ing), the Graduate School, the Jacob F. 
Buckman Hall of Engineering and Apphed 
Science, Echlin Hall Computer Center, the 



Admission 13 



Marvin K. Peterson Library, the Student 
Center, the Psychology Building, Robert B. 
Dodds Hall (which houses the School of 
Business), the Campus Store, residence halls 
and the Gatehouse, which contains the 
Office of the Division of Continuing 
Education. 

The South Campus includes Harugari 
Hall, which houses the School of Hotel, 
Restaurant and Tourism Administration, 
and the Student Services Building where 
students wiU find the Graduate Records 
Office, the Registrar's Office, the Interna- 
tional Services Office, Financial Aid Office 
and other departments. The university's ath- 
letic fields and gymnasium are located 
at the North Campus site. 



Admission 



General Requirements 

Admission requirements for the doctoral 
degree program in management systems are 
fully described beginning on page 66. 

Applicants to the University of New 
Haven Graduate School are required to have 
an undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution. Certain programs have addition- 
al requirements for admission, details of 
which are included in the program Listings 
in this catalog. 

Admission decisions are based primarily 
on an appUcant's undergraduate record. A 
prospective student who is currently com- 
pleting undergraduate study should submit 
an official transcript complete to the date of 
application. In most cases, an admission 
decision will be made on the basis of a par- 
tial transcript, contingent upon completion 
of the baccalaureate degree. Registration 
will not be permitted until a final, official 
transcript is submitted to the Graduate 
School Admissions Office. 

Students may submit scores from the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the 
Graduate Management Admission Test 
(GMAT) or the Miller Analogies Test in sup- 
port of their applications. Students applying 



to certain programs will be required to sub- 
mit test scores from one of the above exami- 
nations. Information regarding specific 
requirements for submission of test scores is 
contained in the program descriptions else- 
where in this catalog. 

Procedure 

An apphcant for admission to the 
Graduate School must submit the formal 
application form, two letters of recommen- 
dation, complete official transcripts of all 
previous college work, the non-refundable 
apphcation fee and test scores (if required). 
Apphcation materials are located in the back 
of this catalog. 

Application to the doctoral program 
requires special forms which are available 
from the Graduate School Admissions Office. 

In most cases, students may be admitted 
for any term with the exception of doctoral 
students who are usually admitted for the 
fall term only. Should a student be unable to 
enter the Graduate School during the term 
for which admission is granted, the accep- 
tance will remain open for one calendar 
year After one year, a new application for 
admission may be required. 

Admission Categories 

Admitted applicants and students in the 
Graduate School are assigned to one of four 
categories: fully accepted, provisionally 
accepted, special or auditor 

Domestic students who wish to matricu- 
late in a degree program, but who have not 
completed the apphcation process and /or 
have not yet received a formal acceptance 
decision, may register as in-process students 
for one term while completing the apphca- 
tion process. 

A bachelor's degree is required for 
admission to all categories listed below. 

Fully Accepted 

Students accepted without special stipu- 
lations for entrance into a regular degree 
program or certificate study are classified as 
fully accepted students. 



14 



Provisionally Accepted 

An applicant whose undergraduate grade 
point average falls below the standard set 
for full acceptance, or whose undergraduate 
background otherwise indicates a need for 
additional coursework or a short period of 
academic supervision and review, may be 
accepted provisionally. Students accepted 
provisionally should seek advice from the 
appropriate coordinator or adviser during 
the provisional period. 

Students must complete the requirements 
stipulated in the provisional acceptance at 
the beginning of the program of study. Upon 
completion of the provisional requirements, 
each student's record will be evaluated for 
admission as a fully matriculated candidate 
for the degree. 

Special 

Special student status is reserved for stu- 
dents who do not wish to matriculate in a 
degree program or certificate study. 
Registration in this category is limited to no 
more than 12 credit hours of graduate work. 
Students who wish to continue graduate 
work must be accepted into a specific gradu- 
ate program. Special students are responsi- 
ble for meeting prerequisite requirements 
for the courses they wish to take. 

Auditor 

An auditor is allowed to attend class and 
is expected to participate in class discussions 
and complete the required assignments. An 
auditor receives no grade or credit toward 
any degree. While auditor status does not 
imply admission to any of the graduate 
degree programs, there is an official registra- 
tion procedure and a notation of audit 
placed on the transcript. Both current stu- 
dents and new students are eligible to audit 
University of New Haven Graduate School 
courses. 

Admission of International 
Students 

University of New Haven graduate pro- 
grams are open to qualified international 



students. To qualify for graduate school, a 
prospective student must have completed 
sufficient undergraduate preparation in a 
degree program acceptable to the University 
of New Haven Graduate School. 

Because the review of applications from 
international students takes considerable 
time, it is important that international stu- 
dent applications and all supporting materi- 
als be received by the Graduate School prior 
to the deadline dates outlined in the interna- 
tional student information packet. 

U.S. Immigration regulations require that 
a student holding a student visa make satis- 
factory progress toward a degree. 
Satisfactory progress requires full-time 
study, which is generally interpreted to 
mean completing at least three courses each 
trimester. Prospective international students 
should note that not all graduate programs 
are designed to permit full-time study. A 
complete listing of such programs is provid- 
ed on pages 20-21. 

To apply for admission to the Graduate 
School and to be ready to begin study, 
prospective international students must 
complete all of the steps outhned in the fol- 
lowing section. 

International Application Process 

All applicants must submit the following 
application materials: 

1. A completed application form and the 
appropriate application fee. 

2. Two letters of recommendation. 

3. Official transcripts of all undergraduate 
work and graduate work completed. 
AppUcants may be asked to provide 
substantiation of courses taken, grades 
received, and the academic reputation of 
the undergraduate school within the 
educational system of the country in 
which the school is located. A certified 
English translation must accompany all 
non-English transcripts. 

4. Proof of English proficiency. This must 
consist of one of the following: 

a. The Test of English as a Foreign 
Language (TOEFL) examination with 
a score of 500 or above. (Certain pro- 
grams require a higher TOEFL score.) 



b. Proof that undergraduate instruction 
and coursework has been done in 
EngHsh. 

c. Completion of the advanced level of 
intensive English language training 
in an approved program. Special 
arrangements may be made through 
the Graduate Admissions Office for 
such training at the New Haven 
Adult Education Center (located one 
mile from the main campus), at the 
ELS EngUsh Language Center at 
Albertus Magnus College or at Strong 
Hill Language Institute, all in New 
Haven. 

Students whose TOEFL scores are less 
than 550 and/or students who enter the 
Graduate School following completion of 
an intensive English language training 
program are required to take E 600 
English Language Workshop in the first 
term of enrollment at the Graduate School. 

5. Financial documentation. International 
students must provide verification of 
sufficient funds for study and living 
expenses at the University of New 
Haven for 12 months. This verification 
must be one of the following: 

a. Completed University of New Haven 
Financial Statement of International 
Students form and supporting 
documents. 

b. Current official scholarship letter. 

The University of New Haven does 
not offer need-based financial assistance 
to international students. 

6. Acceptance fee of $50. This non-refund- 
able fee must be paid before immigra- 
tion documents (IAP-66 for J-1 students 
or Form I-20AB for students entering 
the United States on F-1 visas) will be 
issued. This fee is not credited toward 
tuition and is not required for scholar- 
ship students. 

Appropriate documents (lAP-66 for J-1 
students or Form 1-20AB for students enter- 
ing the United States on F-1 visas) will be 
issued only after a student has submitted all 
required materials, has been accepted in a 
program of study, has provided acceptable 
proof of English proficiency and financial 



Registration 15 

status, and has paid the $50 acceptance fee. 
Initial Attendance at the University. All 

international students accepted into the 
Graduate School must report to the 
International Services Office before register- 
ing at the Graduate School. 

At the time of registration, students will 
be required to pay a one-time international 
student fee of $100 (non-refundable) and the 
tuition and fees for one trimester. 

The international student fee is required 
of all international undergraduate and grad- 
uate students at the university. The fee 
directly and indirectly supports a variety of 
services and programs for international stu- 
dents including: orientation programs, 
cross-cultural workshops, local community 
activities, international alumni programs, 
subscriptions to international newspapers 
and magazines for the campus library, and 
operation of the International Services 
Office. 

All full-time students must subscribe to 
the university health insurance program. 
This coverage supplements the services pro- 
vided by the campus Health Services Center. 
Part of the premium (approximately $50 per 
year) for the health insurance will be 
charged to aU full-time students. 

Registration 

Registration deadUnes are listed in the 
course schedules published for each term. 
Returning students and new students who 
have been admitted to programs will receive 
registration materials and can register by 
mail. 

Domestic students who have not com- 
pleted the appUcation process and /or have 
not yet received a formal acceptance deci- 
sion may register as in-process students. 
International students may not register as 
in-process students. In-process students will 
not receive registration materials in the mail 
but may register in person at the main cam- 
pus or at an off -campus center. Proof that 
the in-process student has an undergraduate 
degree will be required at the time of regis- 
tration, and, whenever possible, unofficial 
transcripts of previous coursework should 
be provided to faciUtate advisement. In-pro- 



16 

cess status remains in effect for one term. 
In-process students may register for no 
more than six credits without the approval 
of the Director of Graduate Admissions or 
the coordinator of the program for which 
they are applying. 

It is the responsibiUty of in-process 
students to see to it that all materials in 
support of their applications are received 
by the Graduate School in time for an 
acceptance decision before the next term. 
In-process students will not be permitted 
to register for a second term until an accep- 
tance decision has been made. Permission 
to register as an in-process student does not 
guarantee admission to the Graduate 
School. 

Students who fail to register for three 
consecutive terms will no longer receive 
registration materials. It will be the respon- 
sibility of such students to notify the 
Graduate Records Office of their desire to 
continue graduate study. Files for students 
who revert to an inactive status will be 
retained for two years. At the end of that 
period, only a permanent record of credits 
earned is maintained. 

Students may not add a course after the 
first week of class unless written permis- 
sion of the instructor is received. A student 
may not withdraw from a course any time 
after the seventh scheduled class meeting 
without permission of the instructor. 
Course additions or withdrawals may be 
handled in person or by mail. 

The university reserves the right to 
change class schedules or instructors at any 
time. It further reserves the right to cancel 
any course, and, in such cases, will refund 
full tuition to the students. 

Students with an outstanding balance 
will not be permitted to register. Current 
students who register after the registration 
deadline will be assessed a late registration 
fee. 



ACADEMIC 
POLICIES 



17 



Academic Honesty and Ethics 

The policies of the University of New 
Haven require commitment to academic 
honesty and ethics. Violations of university 
standards for academic honesty (including 
plagiarism), whether in fact or in spirit, will 
usually be handled by the faculty member 
involved. However, if sufficient reason is 
found, violation may be grounds for dis- 
missal from the Graduate School. 

Students are expected to complete all 
course requirements on their own initiative, 
with no collaboration unless specifically 
authorized by the instructor. In addition, use 
of the work, ideas or knowledge of another 
person, publisher, company, government or 
organization must be properly identified by 
reference or footnote in all materials submit- 
ted by the student. 

Students wishing to appeal the decision 
of a faculty member regarding academic 
honesty and ethics should contact the Office 
of the Dean of the Graduate School. 

Access to Academic Records 

Academic records are maintained on each 
student enrolled in the Graduate School. 
These records are housed in the Graduate 
Records Office, located in the Student 
Services Building. The following types of 
academic records are maintained: the appli- 
cation for admission and supporting docu- 
ments such as test scores, transcripts of 
undergraduate and other prior study, letters 
of recommendation, registration forms. 



grade lists, course schedules, petitions filed 
by the student and any other documents or 
correspondence pertaining to the student's 
academic work. 

The Graduate Registrar is responsible for 
controlUng access to and disclosure of stu- 
dents' educational records. Students desir- 
ing to inspect or review their academic 
records should address a written, dated 
request to the Graduate Registrar. 

Information regarding confidentiality, 
privacy and right of access to student 
records can be obtained from the Graduate 
Registrar. 

Attendance 

It is the responsibility of the student to 
meet all classes and to take all examinations 
as scheduled. Faculty have the right to 
require a standard of attendance, even if it 
conflicts with professional and job-related 
responsibilities of students. Students whose 
jobs require that they be absent from class 
must realize that it is their responsibihty to 
determine whether such absence is permit- 
ted by the faculty member involved and to 
meet the professor's requirements for mak- 
ing up work missed, if the professor allows 
missed time to be made up. 

Make-up Policy 

Make-up examinations are a privilege 
extended to students at the discretion of the 
instructor, who may grant permission for 
make-up examinations to those students 



18 



who miss an exam as a result of a medical 
problem, personal emergency or previously 
announced absence. On the other hand, 
instructors may choose to adopt a "no make- 
up" policy. 

A make-up test fee may be assessed when 
a student is permitted to make up an 
announced test during the term or to take an 
end-of-term exam at a time other than the 
scheduled time. In either case, the make-up 
examination fee will be paid by the student 
at the Business Office. 

Academic Standards 

Grading System 

The Graduate School uses the following 
grading system: 
Superior performance: 

A+ = 4.30 quality points 

A = 4.00 quality points 

A- = 3.70 quality points 

Good performance: 

B+ = 3.30 quality points 
B = 3.00 quality points 
B- =2.70 quality points 

Passing performance: 

C+ = 2.30 quahty points 
C = 2.00 quality points 
C- = 1.70 quality points 

Failure: 

F = Zero quality points 

P = Zero quality points 

Pass; carries credit hours toward the 
degree. Use generally limited to disserta- 
tion, thesis and Executive M.B.A. courses. 

P+ = Zero quality points 

Pass with distinction; carries credit hours 
toward the degree. Use limited to 
Executive M.B.A. courses. 

S = Zero quality points 

Satisfactory performance in a non-credit 
course. 

U = Zero quality points 

Unsatisfactory performance in a non- 
credit course. 

W = Zero quality points 
Withdrawal from a course 



I = Zero quality points 

Incomplete; see policy rules below 
regarding incomplete courses. 

T = Zero quality points 

Used for thesis students who have not 
completed work during the term in which 
they originally registered for the course. 
Students must complete the work within 
the time limit for completion of the 
degree. 

AU = Zero quality points 

Audit; indicates that a student registered 
for and attended a class, but received no 
credit toward any degree. 

Some employers require that a letter 
grade (A+ through C-, or F) be awarded if a 
student is to receive tuition reimbursement. 
It is the student's responsibility, in a non- 
credit course, to inform the faculty member 
of the need for a letter grade. 

The grading system displayed above, 
with plus and minus designations allowed, 
became effective beginning with the fall 
trimester 1987. Prior to that date, including 
the summer term 1987, plus and minus 
grades were not used. 

Grade Reports 

Reports of the final grade in each subject 
will be mailed to the student from the 
Graduate Records Office soon after the close 
of each term, providing all financial obliga- 
tions have been met. 

Incomplete Coursework 

A grade of Incomplete (I) is given only in 
special circumstances and indicates that the 
individual student has been given permis- 
sion by the instructor to complete the work 
for the course with the same instructor after 
the end of the trimester or term. 

Master's-level students who receive a 
grade of I (Incomplete) should complete the 
work within three months after the end of 
the term in most cases. Master's-level stu- 
dents may have a time period specified by 
the instructor, and not to exceed one year, to 
complete the work required for the course 
and have a grade submitted to the Graduate 



Academic Policies 19 



Registrar. An I grade that is not replaced 
within the one-year allotted time will 
remain as a permanent 1 (Incomplete) on the 
student's permanent record. 

Doctoral students enrolled in 700-level 
courses who receive a grade of 1 
(Incomplete) have a time period specified by 
the instructor, and not to exceed three 
months, to complete the work required for 
the 700-level course and have a grade sub- 
mitted to the Graduate Registrar. At the doc- 
toral level, an I grade that is not replaced 
within the three-month allotted time will 
remain as a permanent I (Incomplete) on the 
student's permanent record. 

Quality Point Ratio 

The academic standing of each student is 
determined on the basis of the quality point 
ratio (QPR) earned each term. Each letter 
grade is assigned a quality point value. 
These quaUty point values are shown in the 
preceding section describing the grading 
system. 

The quality point ratio is obtained by 
multiplying the quality point value of each 
grade by the number of credit hours 
assigned to each course as listed in the cata- 
log, then dividing the sum of the quality 
points earned by the number of credit hours 
attempted in courses for which a grade of 
A+ through C- or F is awarded. 

A cumulative quality point ratio is 
obtained by calculating the quahty point 
ratio for all courses taken at the University 
of New Haven which are part of the degree 
program. 

Academic Probation 

Any student whose cumulative quality 
point ratio (QPR) is below 3.00, a "B" aver- 
age, will be considered to be on academic 
probation, and may be required to obtain 
permission from the program coordinator 
before registering for additional course- 
work. A student at the master's level whose 
cumulative QPR is below 2.70 after comple- 
tion of 24 credits will be required to with- 
draw from the Graduate School. A doctoral 
student whose cumulative QPR is below 
3.00 after completion of 12 credits of doctor- 



al coursework will be subject to dismissal. 

Appeals concerning required withdrawal 
from the Graduate School under these cir- 
cumstances should be directed to the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

Repetition of Work 

A student may repeat a course. The grade 
received in the second attempt would super- 
sede the original grade in the computation 
of the quahty point ratio (QPR) if the second 
grade is higher. Both grades remain on the 
transcript. The course may be used only 
once for credit toward the requirements for 
completion of the degree program. 
Repetition of work at the doctoral level is 
subject to limitations which are described 
elsewhere in this catalog. 

Awarding of Degrees 

The University of New Haven awards 
degrees twice a year, at commencements in 
January and in June. A cumulative quality 
point ratio of 3.00 and completion of all pro- 
gram and university requirements are 
required for graduation and the conferring 
of master's degrees from the Graduate 
School. All students must file a graduation 
petition form in order to have their names 
placed on the list of potential graduates. 

A cumulative quality point ratio of 3.30 in 
doctoral coursework, satisfactory comple- 
tion of the written and oral doctoral compre- 
hensive examinations, followed by 
successful completion and defense of the 
doctoral dissertation are required for gradu- 
ation and the conferring of the doctoral 
degree. All doctoral candidates must also 
file a graduation petition form in order to 
have their names placed on the list of poten- 
tial graduates. 

Students completing their degree require- 
ments at the end of the fall term will receive 
their degrees in January. Students complet- 
ing their degree requirements at the end of 
the winter term will receive their degrees at 
the June commencement. Students complet- 
ing the requirements for their degrees at the 
end of the spring term or the summer ses- 
sion will receive their degrees the following 
January. Students completing the require- 



20 



ments for their degrees in July or August 
will receive formal statements that they 
have completed all degree requirements and 
that their diplomas will be awarded at the 
next commencement. 

Petition for Graduation 

Candidates for January commencement 
must file a petition with the Graduate Records 
Office no later than October 15, and for June 
commencement no later than March 1 . 
Forms for this purpose are available in the 
Graduate School Office and in the Office of 
the Graduate Registrar. Payment of the gradu- 
ation fee must accompany the petition. 

Should a candidate not complete all the 
requirements for graduation before the 
deadline, after having filed the petition to 
graduate and paid the fee, the student will 
have to petition again at a later date. At that 
time, only the refiling fee will be charged. 

All financial obligations to the university 
must be met prior to graduation. 

Time Limit for 
Completion of Degree 

A student must complete all the require- 
ments for the master's degree or certificate 
within five years of the date of completion 
of the first course following formal applica- 
tion to the degree program. Any extension 
of the time limit for completion of the 
degree can be granted only by the Dean of 
the Graduate School after consultation with 
the appropriate program coordinator. 

Students enrolled in the doctoral program 
must complete all coursework and pass the 
doctoral comprehensive examinations with- 
in five years of the date of completion of the 
first 700-level course in the doctoral pro- 
gram. The dissertation must be completed 
and successfully defended, and the doctoral 
degree requirements completed within eight 
years of the date of completion of the first 
doctoral course. 

Residency Requirements 

Degree programs have a 30-graduate- 
credit residency requirement, with the 
exception of the M.B.A./M.S.I.E. and M.B.A./ 



M.P.A. dual degree programs which have a 
60-graduate-credit residency requirement. 
Credits toward the residency requirement 
may be earned at the main campus or at the 
off-campus locations. All students should 
plan on taking at least some of their courses 
on the main campus. Credits apphed toward 
the residency requirement for one graduate 
degree may not be counted toward the resi- 
dency requirement for another graduate 
degree. 

FuU-Time Study 

A full-time course of study at the mas- 
ter's level is defined as three courses in the 
current term. Required non-credit courses 
(A 600, E 600, EC 600, HR 600, QA 600, 
TT600) count toward full-time study. Under 
certain circumstances the department chair, 
the program coordinator and the Graduate 
School administration may approve a reduc- 
tion in credits. 

Full-time study at the doctoral level is 
defined as registration for a minimum of 
four and a maximum of six doctoral courses 
per academic year of three trimesters. For 
international students who are required to 
maintain full-time enrollment for their 
immigration status, full-time doctoral study 
is defined as two doctoral courses per 
trimester for a total of six doctoral courses 
per academic year. Such persons will contin- 
ue to be considered full-time students as 
long as their dissertation adviser, depart- 
ment chair and /or the director of the doctor- 
al program certify that the student is making 
satisfactory progress toward completion of 
the doctoral degree. (Part-time doctoral 
study consists of registration for an average 
of two doctoral courses per academic year). 

A student who wishes to enroll for more 
than four courses in a given trimester must 
secure the permission of the program coor- 
dinator. 

Full-time enrollment is possible in the fol- 
lowing degree programs: accounting, busi- 
ness administration, community psychology, 
computer and information science, criminal 
justice, environmental engineering, environ- 
mental science, fire science, forensic science, 
hotel and restaurant management M.B.A. 



Academic Policies 21 



concentration, industrial engineering, indus- 
trial/organizational psychology, industrial 
relations, occupational safety and health 
management, operations research, public 
administration, taxation, tourism and travel 
administration M.B.A. concentration, and 
the business administration/industrial engi- 
neering and business administration/ 
pubhc administration dual degrees. Each of 
the above may also be pursued on a part- 
time basis. 

Part-Time Study 

Part-time study at the master's level is 
defined as one or two courses in the current 
term. Half-time study at the master's level is 
defined as registration for two courses in the 
current term; registration for only one 
course is less than half-time study. 

Part-time study at the doctoral level con- 
sists of registration for an average of two 
doctoral courses per academic year. 

The electrical engineering and mechanical 
engineering programs and all certificates 
have limited scheduled offerings and, there- 
fore, are generally pursued on a part-time 
basis. 

International students with F-1 or j-1 immi- 
gration status may not matriculate in the electri- 
cal engineering or mechanical engineering 
programs, or enroll in study leading to any cer- 
tificate because these are part-time only. 

Transfer Credit 

Transfer credit may be given for graduate 
courses taken at other regionally accredited 
institutions prior to matriculation at the 
University of New Haven, subject to the fol- 
lowing conditions: 

• the courses were at the graduate level; 

• each grade was B- or better; and 

• the course did not fulfill requirements 
for any other degree already earned by 
the student. 

Graduate students currently matriculated 
at the university must secure written 
approval before taking courses at another 
institution if they plan to transfer that credit 
into their UNH programs. Course coordina- 
tion forms are available in the Graduate 
School Office for this purpose. Transfer cred- 



its and coordinated course credits are not 
included in courses used to estabUsh a stu- 
dent's QPR at the University of New Haven. 

Waiver of Courses 

Some programs permit waivers of core 
courses on the basis of undergraduate cours- 
es taken at accredited institutions. Waivers 
of elective courses are not permitted, nor are 
waivers based upon experience. In such 
cases, substitution of a more advanced 
course may be allowed. 

For a course to be waived, a student must 
first secure the written approval of the pro- 
gram coordinator, the department chair or a 
faculty member acting for the chair in the 
department in which the waiver is request- 
ed. 

Even if a waiver has been granted, a stu- 
dent who wishes to take a waived course for 
review or as a refresher course may do so. 

Under certain circumstances, a student 
who has independent knowledge of a spe- 
cific course may be given permission to take 
a crediting examination in lieu of taking the 
course. Permission to take a crediting exami- 
nation must be granted by the student's 
department chair or program coordinator, 
the chair of the department offering the 
course and the Dean of the Graduate School. 
Additional information and permission 
forms are available from the Graduate 
School Office. 

Prerequisites 

Students are expected to meet the prereq- 
uisite requirements for each course taken. 
Exceptions must be approved by the course 
instructor and the student's adviser or pro- 
gram coordinator. Credit may be denied to a 
student who takes a course without the prerequi- 
sites. 

Dropping/Adding a Class 

A student who wishes to make a change 
in class schedule must complete a "drop 
card" or an "add card" or both. These are 
available from the Graduate Registrar's 
Office. Written permission of the instructor 
is required to add a class after the first class 



22 

meeting. If a student withdraws from a class 
after the first class meeting, the tuition 
refund policy is appUed. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

Students who are required to take com- 
prehensive examinations in order to com- 
plete their degree programs must obtain the 
appropriate comprehensive examination 
approval form(s) from the Graduate School, 
secure the necessary approvals and pay the 
required fees, if applicable. Students should 
confirm arrangements for comprehensive 
examinations with the program coordinator. 

Research Projects 

and Independent Study 

All academic programs leading to a 
degree require the completion of a thesis, a 
research or other special project, internship 
or comprehensive examination. Students 
must have the written approval of their 
advisers and department chairs prior to 
enrolling for project or internship credit on 
an individual basis. This is accomplished by 
completing the appropriate forms (available 
from the student's department or from the 
Graduate School and Graduate Records 
offices) and securing the required approvals. 

Students preparing a research project or 
independent study should follow the guide- 
lines presented in the Thesis Manual: A Guide 
for the Preparation of Graduate Theses, Research 
Projects and Dissertations, copies of which are 
on reserve at the library. 

In addition to the project requirement 
described above, students may (in certain 
cases) enroll for independent study under 
the supervision of a faculty adviser. A stu- 
dent may not register for more than two indefien- 
dent study courses within a degree program. An 
independent study proposal must be 
approved by the student's adviser or pro- 
gram coordinator as well as the coordinator 
or chair of the department offering the 
course. 

Thesis 

Completion of a master's thesis is 
required for some academic degree pro- 



grams; in other programs, the thesis is 
optional. A number of preliminary steps are 
required before registration for thesis will be 
accepted by the Graduate Registrar. The stu- 
dent completes the Proposal for Thesis form 
(available at the Graduate School Office), in 
which the proposed subject, the methodolo- 
gy and the hypotheses are described. The 
student secures the approval signature of a 
faculty member who will serve as adviser. 
The student also must secure the approval 
of the proposed thesis and the thesis adviser 
from the department chair and /or program 
coordinator and the Dean of the Graduate 
School. Only after the Graduate Registrar 
has received the approved form will the stu- 
dent be permitted to register for thesis. 

A thesis will carry no fewer than six aca- 
demic credits taken over no fewer than two 
academic terms. A preliminary draft must 
be presented to the adviser at least 75 days 
prior to commencement. Upon approval by 
the adviser and program coordinator, two 
final, unbound copies are presented to the 
Graduate School. A date and time will then 
be scheduled for the thesis defense before 
the student's thesis committee and the Dean 
of the Graduate School. Successful defense 
of the thesis must be completed at least 
three weeks prior to the date of commence- 
ment. 

After the successful defense and the 
approval of the thesis by the Dean of the 
Graduate School, thesis credit is awarded 
and the thesis is deposited for binding at the 
university library where it becomes a part of 
the permanent collection. Additional copies 
of the thesis may be required by the depart- 
ment or the program coordinator. 

For guidance in the preparation of theses, 
graduate students should consult the Thesis 
Manual: A Guide for the Preparation of Graduate 
Theses, Research Projects and Dissertations, 
copies of which are available in the Grad- 
uate School Office. Questions not resolved 
by the instructions should be settled in con- 
sultation with the adviser and by reference 
to a standard style manual. The Graduate 
School participates in the University 
Microfilm Masters Program, and outstand- 
ing theses will be awarded this recognition 
upon the recommendation of the adviser. 



Academic Policies 23 



the program coordinator, or both. 

Information regarding the preparation 
and defense of the doctoral dissertation may 
be found on page 68. Additional details are 
outhned in the Thesis Manual: A Guide for the 
Preparation of Graduate Theses, Research 
Projects and Dissertations, copies of which are 
available at the Graduate School Office or 
from the director of the doctoral program. 

Academic Advising 

It is the student's responsibility to select 
courses in accordance with prerequisites, the 
adviser's recommendations, the departmen- 
tal plan of study (if required) and the 
requirements for the degree. 

Students needing further explanation 
about program requirements or course 
sequencing should request academic advise- 
ment. Appointments for academic counsel- 
ing should be scheduled through 
department advisers or program coordina- 
tors. Off -campus advisement sessions are 
held prior to each trimester 

A student is not required to file a formal 
plan of study with the Graduate School. It is 
the student's responsibility to meet the stat- 
ed requirements for the degree. 

Grievance Procedure 

A formal pohcy for the handling of stu- 
dent grievances is available in the Graduate 
School Office. 

Diversity Policy 

The University of New Haven is commit- 
ted to achieving a diverse and pluralistic 
community which reflects the multiracial 
and culturally diverse society in contempo- 
rary America. 

The Diversity Committee has been estab- 
hshed to guide the university in implement- 
ing this Diversity Policy. The university will 
work toward attracting and retaining a 
diverse faculty, staff and student body for 
the purpose of creating a pluralistic scholar- 
ly community. The Committee will assist the 
administration in the development and 
implementation of programs and policies 
that support an enriched educational experi- 
ence for a diverse university community. 



The University of New Haven does not 
discriminate in admissions, educational pro- 
grams or employment against any individu- 
al on account of sex, race, color, reUgion, 
age, disabiUty, sexual orientation, or national 
or ethnic origin. 



25 



TUITION 
AND FEES 



The following are the University of New 
Haven tuition, fees and charges which will 
be in effect for the fall 1991 term. The uni- 
versity reserves the right, at any time, to 
make whatever changes may be deemed 
necessary in admission requirements, fees, 
charges, tuition, policies, regulations and 
academic programs prior to the start of any 
class, semester, trimester or session. 

Master's Tuition 

Tuition, per credit hour $ 275 

Tuition, per 3-credit course 825 

Executive M.B.A. program 17,600 

Non-credit course fee, per course 525 

Auditor, per course 825 

E 600, English Language 

Workshop 825 

Master's Non-refundable Fees 

Application fee $ 50 

Executive M.B.A. application fee 50 

Auditor application fee 50 

Continuing registration fee 25 

Co-op registration fee, full-time 100 

part-time 50 

Graduate Student Council fee, 

per term 5 

Graduation petition fee 50 

Late filing fee, after March 1 (June), 

Oct. 15 (January) 100 

Graduation refiling fee 50 

Health insurance fee 

(per year, all full-time students).... 50 

International student acceptance fee. 50 

Laboratory fee 85 



Late payment fee 

(after scheduled due date)* 25 

Late registration fee, 

current students 15 

New international student fee 

(one-time fee) 100 

Registration fee, per term 5 

Senior professional certificate/ 

professional certificate fee 

(payable upon completion 

of program) 35 

Transcript fee, first copy free 

Additional copies 4 

Make-up examination fee 10 

Comprehensive examination fee 150 

Crediting examination fee 150 

Sc.D. Program Tuition and Fees 

Apphcation fee (non-refundable) $ 50 

Tuition, per 700-level course 1,550 

Dissertation tuition, per course 800 

Registration fee, per term 

(non-refundable) 5 

Graduate Student Council fee, 

per term (non-refundable) 5 

Qualifying examination fee 

(where applicable) 150 

Continuing registration fee 500 

*A late fee plus 1 14 percent per month penalty 
wUl be assessed on outstanding balances. 



26 



Payment 

Tuition for graduate courses is due at reg- 
istration. However, the university permits 
graduate students to pay tuition on an 
installment basis, paying one half with the 
registration form and the balance before the 
end of the first week of the term. All stu- 
dents who have not completed tuition pay- 
ments by the end of the first week of the 
term will be assessed the late payment fee. 

Students are responsible for payment of 
tuition to the university, even though they 
may be eligible for their employer's tuition 
reimbursement plan. Students are responsi- 
ble for making their own arrangements with 
their employers for reimbursement. 

The university withholds the giving of 
grades, the awarding of diplomas, the 
issuance of transcripts and the granting of 
honorable dismissal to any student whose 
account is in arrears. 

The university accepts MasterCard and 
VISA. 

Withdrawal 

A student may withdraw from a course 
up through the seventh week of the 
trimester without a notation on the tran- 
script. A withdrawal after the seventh week 
requires the agreement of the instructor and 
means a "W" is recorded on the student's 
transcript. 

To be eligible for a cancellation or refund 
of tuition charges, students must formally 
notify the Registrar of their intention to 
withdraw by completing the university 
withdrawal form and submitting it to the 
Registrar by mail or in person. The date of 
the postmark on the mailed withdrawal 
forms, or the date of submission on those 
brought in person, determines the amount 
of the refund, if any, due the student. 

Refunds 

The refund policy for graduate students 
who withdraw from any course or from any 
program (with the exception of the 
Executive M.B.A.) is as follows: 100 percent 
cancellation of tuition upon formal with- 
drawal prior to the first regularly scheduled 



class meeting, 80 percent cancellation of 
tuition upon formal withdrawal prior to the 
second regularly scheduled class meeting, 
60 percent cancellation of tuition upon for- 
mal withdrawal prior to the third regularly 
scheduled class meeting, 40 percent cancel- 
lation of tuition upon formal withdrawal 
prior to the fourth regularly scheduled class 
meeting, 20 percent cancellation of tuition 
upon formal withdrawal prior to the fifth 
regularly scheduled class meeting. No can- 
cellation will be made after the fifth regular- 
ly scheduled class meeting. Any resulting 
credit balance will be refunded upon 
request. 

The refund policy for the Executive 
M.B.A. program is as follows: For E.M.B.A. 
students who withdraw after completion of 
one module or less, one-half of the year's 
tuition will be cancelled. 



Financial Assistance 

The University of New Haven offers a 
comprehensive program of financial assis- 
tance to qualified students including assis- 
tantships, fellowships, need-based 
grants-in-aid, campus employment opportu- 
nities and student loans. Application proce- 
dures for financial assistance are detailed 
below. 

Need-based financial aid programs are 
available to matriculated students who are 
U.S. citizens or nationals. Merit-based pro- 
grams are open to all matriculated students. 

Need-Based Programs (U.S. citizens or 
nationals only) 

• University of New Haven Graduate 
Grants-in-Aid — Grant assistance is 
available from university resources for 
students demonstrating exceptional need. 

• College Work-Study — Employment 
opportunities are available for qualified 
students in university academic and 
administrative offices. Students must be 
enrolled for a minimum of two courses 
per trimester to qualify. 

• Stafford Student Loans — Stafford 
Student Loans (formerly the Guaranteed 



Financial Assistance 27 



Student Loan program) may be obtained 
by qualified students enrolled for at least 
two courses per trimester. Eligible stu- 
dents may borrow up to $7,500 per aca- 
demic year with interest charges and 
repayment beginning six months after the 
borrower leaves school. Students can 
obtain an application for a Stafford Loan 
from any bank. The appUcation form 
must be submitted to the Financial Aid 
Office. In addition, loan applicants must 
submit a full financial aid application. 

Non-Need-Based Programs (U.S. citizens 
or nationals only) 

• Supplemental Loans for Students (SLS) 

— Supplemental Loans for Students are 
loans designed to provide additional 
funds for educational expenses and, like 
Stafford Loans, are made by a lender such 
as a bank, credit union or savings and 
loan. Graduate students may borrow up 
to $4,000 per academic year. SLS loans 
may be borrowed in addition to the 
Stafford Loans. Unlike the Stafford Loans, 
borrowers do not have to demonstrate 
financial need, although they may have to 
undergo a credit analysis. For an applica- 
tion and further information, contact any 
local bank. 

Merit-Based Programs (Open to all matric- 
ulated students) 

• Assistantships — Assistantships are com- 
petitive appointments. Graduate assis- 
tants may work up to 20 hours per week 
and receive an hourly compensation as 
well as partial tuition support. 
Applications for assistantships are made 
in late spring for the following year. 
AppUcations and further information are 
available from the Graduate School 
Office. Appointments are made for the 
academic year, starting in September. 

• Fellowships — Fellowships are competi- 
tive awards made to returning students 
on the basis of outstanding academic 
achievement. Recommendations for fel- 
lowships are soUcited annually, and nom- 
inations are sought from the faculty. 
Students may nominate themselves by 



writing to the Dean of the Graduate 
School. Awards are made for the academ- 
ic year, starting in September. 

Application Process 

Complete financial aid appHcation mate- 
rials must be submitted for consideration for 
financial assistance. 

For students applying for need-based assis- 
tance, all documents listed below must be 
subnutted by the following deadlines: 

May 1 for the Fall trimester 
October 15 for the Winter trimester 
January 15 for the Spring trimester 

International students and fellozvship recipi- 
ents are required to submit only a Graduate 
Financial Aid Status Form. U.S. citizens who 
are assistantship recipients are required to sub- 
mit all documents listed below. 

• Graduate Financial Aid Status Form — 

Available in the Financial Aid Office, 
this form must be completed and submit- 
ted to the Financial Aid Office by all stu- 
dents applying for any type of financial 
assistance. 

• Financial Aid Form (FAF) — The FAF 

must be filed by all students applying for 
need-based aid, including Stafford 
Student Loans. Assistantship recipients 
are also required to file the FAF. Forms 
are available from the Financial Aid 
Office and must be submitted to the 
College Scholarship Service for process- 
ing by the deadline date. 

• Tax Documentation — Students are 
required to submit a complete, signed 
copy of their federal income tax return 
(Form 1040) from the most recent tax year 
preceding the faU trimester. If married, 
the applicant must also submit a copy of 
the spouse's Form 1040; if filing as a 
dependent student, the applicant must 
submit a copy (or copies) of the parents' 
tax retum(s) as well. If the student, 
spouse and /or parents did not and will 
not file a tax return, a Non-Tax Filer Form 
must be submitted in lieu of the tax 



28 



return. The Non-Tax Filer Form is avail- 
able in the Financial Aid Office. 

• Financial Aid Transcripts — A Financial 
Aid Transcript Form must be submitted 
for each college the student has attended 
previously, regardless of whether the stu- 
dent received financial aid while attend- 
ing those institutions. The forms are 
available in the Financial Aid Office. 

Refund Policy for Federal Loans 

Students who withdraw from courses 
prior to the end of the fifth week of the 
trimester are entitled to a full or partial 
refund of tuition charges. In the event that a 
student receiving a refund has received fed- 
eral student aid, including a Stafford Loan 
and /or the Supplemental Loans for 
Students (SLS), the following refund formu- 
la (dictated by federal regulations) would 
apply: 

Total Federal Financial Aid 
Refund Amount x j^^^y ^n Financial Aid 
Federal Share 
~ of Refund 



External Assistance Programs 

• Family Education Loan Program (FELP) 

— FELP is a low-interest loan program 
administered by the Connecticut Higher 
Education Supplemental Loan Authority 
(CHESLA). Students must be enrolled at 
least half-time and may borrow from 
$2,000 - $20,000 per academic year at a 
fixed annual rate of 9.7 percent. 
Repayment can be up to 140 months with 
the option of paying interest only while in 
school. Applicants must be credit-worthy. 
For an application and further informa- 
tion call 1-800-252-FELP (in Connecticut) 
or (203) 522-0766. 

• People's Bank/University of New Haven 
Special Tuition Account — Under this 
program students establish a line of credit 
with People's Bank. Once approved, the 
account number may be used for pay- 
ment of direct UNH charges. The mini- 
mum credit line that may be requested is 



$500. The university subsidizes 7 percent 
of the annual percentage rate of 15 per- 
cent; thus, the student's interest rate is 8 
percent. Apphcations are available from 
the Financial Aid Office or at the 
Graduate School. 

Cooperative Education 

Cooperative education programs at the 
University of New Haven provide an oppor- 
tunity for students to combine or alternate 
periods of career-oriented, paid, full-time 
work assignments with their academic pro- 
grams. 

Co-op work assignments for graduate 
students are developed on an individual 
basis. This enables students to integrate the 
experiential learning of the workplace and 
the theoretical understanding of the class- 
room. Enrollment in the co-op program 
includes the opportunity to participate in 
resume writing and interview workshops. 

Co-op employers include large corpora- 
tions, small businesses, government agen- 
cies and nonprofit organizations. Most are in 
Connecticut and adjacent states, but co-op 
staff members can work with out-of-state 
students who would like work assignments 
at home. 

Graduate students may take advantage of 
the co-op program as soon as they enroll at 
the university; however, work assignments 
will not be made until the student has com- 
pleted nine credit hours of graduate study. 
Additional information is available from the 
Co-op Office. 



29 



STUDENT 
SERVICES 



Athletics 

Graduate students are encouraged to 
make use of the North Campus athletic com- 
plex. FaciUties include two basketball courts, 
racquetball court, weight room with univer- 
sal gym, fully equipped training room, six 
tennis courts, a softball field, Vieira Baseball 
Field and Dodds Stadium. 

Graduate students are eligible to take part 
in the intramural competitions in touch foot- 
ball, badminton, basketball, racquetball, 
Softball, tennis and volleyball. 

Campus Store 

The Campus Store provides all necessary 
texts, new and used, that are required for 
courses at the university. It also carries relat- 
ed supplies, greeting cards, imprinted cloth- 
ing, gifts, candy and a selection of 
paperbacks, newspapers and periodicals. 
The Campus Store handles orders for class 
rings and school chairs. Film processing ser- 
vice is also provided for the campus com- 
munity. Used text books may be sold back to 
the store throughout the year. 

Students taking classes at an off -campus 
location may purchase their books at or near 
some of the off -campus sites. In addition, 
arrangements have been made for off-cam- 
pus students to order books directly from 
the bookstore if using a credit card or pay- 
ing by check. Books ordered in this way will 
be shipped to the student. 



Career Development 

The Career Development Office offers 
individual and group career counseling as 
well as special workshops on resume prepa- 
ration, interviewing skills and job research 
techniques. 

Although this office is not an employ- 
ment service and does not guarantee jobs, 
extensive hstings of both full-time and part- 
time positions are maintained to provide a 
common meeting ground for employers and 
prospective employees. Graduate students 
will find this useful in locating part-time 
and full-time jobs while in school, as well as 
for seeking employment following gradua- 
tion. Alumni are also encouraged to use 
these services. 

Employers wishing to list positions may 
contact the office by telephone or in writing, 
giving a description of the position available 
and other details. There is no placement fee 
charged for these services. 

Career Development also assists students 
with questions regarding alternative career 
paths and maintains an extensive research 
library of career information, vocational 
resources, brochures and annual reports of 
employers. 

The Career Development Office produces 
the career development section for the alum- 
ni newsletter. Insight; has a regular career 
section and calendar in The Charger Bulletin; 
and circulates a monthly job recruiting 
newsletter. These publications appear dur- 
ing the first week of every month through- 
out the academic year. Information on career 



30 



development events, workshops, senunars, 
recruitment visits, employment outlook for 
graduates, job listings and job search hints 
are included. 

A recruitment schedule will be mailed to 
any member of the university community 
who wishes it and who provides the office 
with a supply of self-addressed envelopes 
for the number of months desired. 

The Career Development Office is located 
on the upper level of the Student Center and 
is open weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. 

Computer Center 

The Computer Center provides services 
for both administrative and academic func- 
tions at the university, with terminals 
throughout the campus linked to "main- 
frame-like" computers. 

A DEC VAX 6220 is used for the universi- 
ty's management information system (MIS); 
it has a 32-bit processor, 64 megabytes of 
main memory with an ethernet controller, 
peripheral storage capacity of 1 .2 gigabytes 
and the VMS operating system. 

A Data General MV15000 is dedicated to 
academic support. It has a 32-bit processor, 
64 megabytes of main memory and virtual 
address range of 4 gigabytes with peripheral 
storage of 1.4 gigabytes. The operating sys- 
tem is AOS/VS II with multiprogram- 
ming/multitasking capability and handles 
up to 255 concurrent processes. Currently, 
there are 72 VDT ports, a 600 1pm printer, 
several dot-matrix printers and a laser print- 
er. Tubes for student use are spread through- 
out three clusters on the main campus, with 
the largest concentration located in Echlin 
Hall. There is also a cluster in Groton to sup- 
port the university's Southeastern 
Connecticut branch activities; microcomput- 
ers are available there as well. In addition, 
the system supports four Tektronix raster 
graphics terminals with plotter and printer 
as well as a PC /Data General connect for 
up/down loading files. Software includes 
FORTRAN n, Pascal, UNIX, APL, BASIC, 
COBOL, PL/1, RPG, DBMS, LISP and word 
processing; also available are SPSS and 
IMSL, GKS and IGL graphics packages, sev- 
eral financial data files and simulation pack- 



ages for engineering and business. 

Use of the academic Data General is 
available to all faculty and students. 
Technical assistance is available from stu- 
dent aides and from the full-time Computer 
Center staff at the user services area in 
Echlin Hall. 

Additional computing facilities are pro- 
vided by other departments. These include: 
a personal computer laboratory in Echlin 
Hall, maintained by the Institute of 
Computer Studies (ICS), which is available 
to all students; the Computer-Aided 
Engineering Center in Buckman Hall, main- 
tained by the School of Engineering, which 
is available to upper-level engineering and 
computer science students; and the UNIX 
laboratory in Echlin Hall, maintained by the 
Department of Industrial Engineering and 
Computer Science for use by computer sci- 
ence majors. 

One personal computer laboratory/class- 
room in Dodds Hall, maintained by the 
School of Business, and another laboratory 
in Maxcy Hall, maintained by ICS, are used 
for classroom presentations and exercises. 

Counseling Center 

The Counseling Center offers assistance 
and counseling to students with vocational 
and personal problems. 

The Counseling Center also offers testing, 
including admissions, vocational interest 
and personality testing. A controlled testing 
center for the administration of the Miller 
Analogies Test (MAT) and for the reporting 
of scores to graduate schools is maintained 
by the Counsehng Center 

For students who do not know where to 
go for help with a problem, the Counseling 
Center serves as a resource for information 
and direction. 

Alumni 

Students are eligible for membership in 
the UNH Alumni Association immediately 
upon graduation. There are currently more 
than 23,500 members. 

Alumni Association members are entitled 
to certain privileges including use of the 
library, services of the Career Development 



Student Services 31 



Office and special alumni course auditing 
rates. ID cards issued to association mem- 
bers soon after graduation entitle alumni to 
these and other offerings. 

Insight, containing news of campus and 
alumni happenings, is mailed quarterly. 
Homecoming, an annual Scholarship Ball, 
estate planning seminars and other educa- 
tional and social events offer opportunities 
for continued contact with UNH and fellow 
alumni. 

Additional opportunity for active 
involvement with the association and stu- 
dents is provided through participation in 
the annual fundraising campaign as well as 
charter travel programs. 

Alumni board members govern the asso- 
ciation with the assistance of a council of 
additional alumni volunteers. The board 
and council serve as an advisory group to 
the university, working to strengthen bonds 
by promoting communication between 
alumni and the UNH community. 

A major thrust of the Alumni Council is 
the promotion of the joint relationship of 
students and alumni. Students are seen as 
"alumni in matriculation," thus providing 
an additional link between the two groups. 
These efforts stimulate and increase student 
awareness of the valuable role of alumni in 
their lives and careers. 

Development Office 

The development staff works with the 
president of the university, the Board of 
Governors, faculty and staff to secure both 
short- and long-term funding for enhance- 
ment of the university's programs and facili- 
ties. Funds are sought for student financial 
aid, faculty development, equipment, 
library resources and other institutional 
opportunities for growth over and above 
what can be achieved from regular and 
anticipated university income. 

National and local foundations, parents, 
students, alumni and friends support these 
efforts and contribute to the excellence of 
the university. Students play an active role, 
participating in fund-raising events and 
soliciting donations for the annual alumni 
fund. 



Food Services 

The Student Center building houses a 
cafeteria which serves a variety of hot 
entrees, sandwiches, beverages and a la 
carte items. The Charger Cafe, located on the 
main floor of the Student Center, is a pizza 
shop offering subs, pizza and beverages 
during the evening hours. 

Several meal plan options are available 
for graduate students living on or near cam- 
pus. Arrangements for meal plans may be 
made at the Food Services Office in the 
Student Center 

Graduate Student Council 

The Graduate Student Council of the 
University of New Haven was founded in 
1976. Since that time it has expanded its 
horizons through diverse programming and 
as a result of the increased enrollment of 
graduate students. 

The Graduate Student Council is a stu- 
dent organization funded by the fee paid by 
all graduate students each trimester Thus, 
all graduate students enrolled at UNH are 
automatically members and share in the 
activities of the council. 

The purpose of the Graduate Student 
Council is to promote the welfare of the stu- 
dent body of the Graduate School, to give 
counsel and encouragement to all students 
in the Graduate School, to encourage the 
active participation of all graduate students 
in determination of their academic environ- 
ment, to develop and encourage a school 
spirit among the graduate student body 
through social and other activities, and to 
convey student opinion to the university 
administration. The Graduate Student 
Council annually elects two of its members 
to serve as delegates to the university's 
Board of Governors. 

The council serves as a cultural, social 
and educational organization through a 
variety of activities including annual sym- 
posiums and seminars, wine-and- 
cheese/coffee-and-doughnut informal 
gatherings and the biannual receptions for 
graduating students. The council also 
donates funds for graduate fellowships and 



32 



graduate student merit scholarships, gives a 
class gift to the university each year and 
provides other supportive services. 

Students enrolled in the doctoral program 
participate in and sponsor special events in 
addition to the activities described above. 

Health Services 

The university's Health Services Center, 
located on the main campus, is open to all 
students without charge. The center is 
staffed by two registered nurses and two 
part-time physicians. A weekly women's 
clinic is staffed by nurse practitioners. 
Health Services provides initial care for 
minor illnesses and injuries as well as diag- 
nosis, referral and follow-up care for more 
serious conditions. The center also is a 
resource for information about medical 
questions and other medical facilities in the 
community. 

Housing/Residential Life 

The Office of Residential Life has infor- 
mation on the availability of on-campus 
housing and provides a limited file of off- 
campus accommodations including apart- 
ments, houses and private rooms. Space for 
on-campus housing is extremely limited, but 
is available occasionally. However, graduate 
students should plan to find living accom- 
modations in an apartment or house off 
campus. 

Institute of Analytical and 
Environmental Chemistry 

The University of New Haven Institute of 
Analytical and Environmental Chemistry is 
an applied research facility with capabilities 
in three general areas of chemical and envi- 
ronmental analysis: sample analysis, proper- 
ty measurement and custom synthesis. 
Administered by the nonprofit UNH 
Foundation and headquartered in the uni- 
versity's School of Engineering, the institute 
is a state-certified laboratory for the analysis 
of various water pollutants. In addition, it is 
equipped to measure the physical proper- 
ties, stability and environmental impact of 
specific pollutants. The institute also has the 



capability to synthesize compounds, sus- 
pected pollutants and products to estabhsh 
identification standards. 

The institute is geared to accept specific 
projects, under contract, and perform the 
necessary research on a confidential basis 
using UNH equipment, laboratory facilities 
and staff. CHents most likely to seek these 
services include chemical companies, con- 
sulting firms, regulatory agencies and 
municipalities. 

Institute of Computer Studies 

The University of New Haven Institute of 
Computer Studies (ICS) is an academic orga- 
nization merging people, ideas and 
resources to promote, enhance and support 
computer-related programs and activities at 
UNH. The institute complements and assists 
academic departments and other computing 
units at the university in promoting and 
developing innovative responses to emerg- 
ing computing requirements. The institute 
also serves as a focal point for joining busi- 
ness and industry with the diverse educa- 
tion-related services, both credit and 
non-credit, of the university. 

The University of New Haven has fos- 
tered the multifaceted development of com- 
puter science and computer-related courses 
in its schools. An increasing number of fac- 
ulty and students are utilizing some aspect 
of computing. The institute was created 
from the recognition of this growing, multi- 
disciplinary diversity of computer needs 
and applications in the university communi- 
ty to provide information and coordination 
in the development of these activities. The 
specific responsibilities which encompass 
the activities of the institute are to: 

• provide coordination for the university's 
many computer-related activities and 
insure long-range planning of computer 
resources; 

• provide and administer certain computer- 
related facilities and services, including a 
personal computer laboratory; 

• assist industrial firms in assessing and 
satisfying their computer training 
requirements through the university's 
several divisions; 



Student Services 33 



• assist departments in offering non-credit 
courses in computer-related areas; 

• assist departments, when appropriate, in 
their development of new programs and 
courses; 

• assist in directing students to computer- 
related programs appropriate to their 
needs; 

• disseminate information concerning aca- 
demic computing activities; 

• serve as institutional liaison for certain 
computer-related projects and associa- 
tions; and 

• promote technological and applications 
research. 

International Student Services 

Each year the University of New Haven 
admits students from many nations. These 
students, representing more than 50 differ- 
ent countries, bring an international and 
intercultural dimension to the campus. 

The International Services Office provides 
for the special needs and concerns of all 
international students. The office staff assists 
students with government regulations, pro- 
vides information on travel in the United 
States and advises students on academic, 
social and cultural adjustment. The office 
also serves as a liaison between the student 
and the university community. 

A wide range of programs has been 
developed including publication of an inter- 
national newsletter, special orientation 
events, international banquets and informa- 
tion seminars. 

Library 

The Marvin K. Peterson Library, named 
in honor of the former president of the uni- 
versity, was opened in 1974. Adjoining 
Maxcy Hall, it includes special collection 
rooms, archives, and reading and reference 
areas. Study is made convenient by modem 
research facilities and equipment including 
microform reader-printers as weU as com- 
puter terminals. 

The hbrary houses nearly 380,000 vol- 
umes. It contains collections of U.S. govern- 
ment documents, numerous corporate 



reports, pamphlet files, microforms, and 
f ,400 current periodical titles. 

The library's resources can support com- 
prehensive research for all graduate pro- 
grams offered by the university. Access via 
OCLC provides nationwide information and 
interlibrary loan capability. The DIALOGUE 
and Dow Jones databases are also available. 

Public Ubraries in New Haven and West 
Haven are accessible to UNH students (non- 
residents must pay a nominal fee). Students 
in the Groton-New London area have access 
to a substantial UNH collection housed in 
the UNH Center at the Groton Public 
Library, which also has access to OCLC and 
DIALOGUE as well as telefacsimile commu- 
nications with the West Haven campus. 
Southeastern graduate students and faculty 
also have library privileges available at 
Connecticut College in New London. 
Students at the Waterbury location have 
access to a UNH collection and full library 
privileges at Teikyo Post University. 
Graduate students enrolled in classes at 
Middletown have limited library privileges 
at Wesleyan University, and a reciprocal 
arrangement allows students in the Fairfield 
County area access to the library at the 
University of Bridgeport. Doctoral students 
are provided with access to Yale University's 
library system, which is one of the nation's 
finest. Graduate students are expected to 
utilize the University of New Haven's col- 
lection at the main campus in West Haven 
for research and thesis preparation. 

Office of Minority Affairs 

The director of the Office of Minority 
Affairs represents the needs and interests of 
minorities at the University of New Haven. 
The staff also works closely with minority 
students to assist them academically, when 
requested, and to help them to maintain cul- 
tural pride and heritage. Social and cultural 
activities which are of special interest to 
minority students are also promoted. 

Publications 

Student publications include Tfw Charger 
Bulletin, the university student newspaper. 



34 

and The Chariot, the annual yearbook. 
Students may volunteer to work on these 
student pubUcations. 

The University of New Haven Press 
(under the auspices of the Bureau of 
Business Research) publishes scholarly texts, 
monographs and the American Busittess 
Reviezv, a biannual, refereed academic jour- 
nal. Information regarding subscriptions 
and submission of manuscripts may be 
obtained from the Bureau of Business 
Research at the School of Business. 

The University of New Haven also pub- 
lishes Essays in Arts and Sciences, an interdis- 
ciplinary scholarly journal devoted to a 
broad range of interests including literature, 
the arts, the social sciences and the natural 
sciences. The journal has been published 
annually since 1971, with occasional addi- 
tional issues on special topics. The journal's 
distribution includes approximately 500 
cooperating college and university libraries. 

Services for Students with 
Disabilities 

The Office for Students with Disabilities 
handles all referrals regarding any student 
with a disability. The director provides guid- 
ance, assistance and information for stu- 
dents with disabilities and oversees the 
university's compliance with Section 504 of 
the H.E.W. Rehabihtation Act of 1973 and 
other governmental regulations. 

All referrals and inquiries concerning any 
matters relating to students with disabilities, 
accessible facilities and /or reasonable 
accommodations should be directed to this 
office. 



WNHU Radio 

WNHU, the university's student-operat- 
ed FM stereo broadcast facility, is operated 
by the Communication Department of the 
School of Business throughout the year on a 
frequency of 88.7 MHz at a power of 1,700 
watts. This extracurricular enterprise, open 
to all undergraduate and graduate students, 
serves southern Connecticut and eastern 
Long Island with music, news and commu- 
nity affairs programming. The WNHU 
broadcast day consists of locally produced 
shows as well as various programs provided 
by several public networks. 

Most WNHU activities in programming, 
business and engineering operations are 
performed by students in the university's 
day, evening and graduate divisions. The 
station personnel will train all qualified stu- 
dents in their respective areas of interest. 



Veterans' Affairs 

The university maintains an Office of 
Veterans' Affairs with a full-time adminis- 
trator who handles support services for vet- 
erans attending the University of New 
Haven. Liaison with state and local veter- 
ans' organizations is maintained on a regu- 
lar basis. 



ACADEMIC 
PROGRAMS 



35 



Accounting 



Coordinator Robert G. McDonald, 
Associate Professor of Accounting, 
M.B.A., New York University; C.M.A., 
C.I.A., C.F.A., C.P.A. 

The overall objective of the master of sci- 
ence in accounting program is to provide a 
framework for accounting inquiry, devised 
in structure and content from the entire 
scope and process of accounting-informa- 
tion-based economic decision making. The 
existence of such a framework is intended to 
provide graduate accountants and profes- 
sional practitioners an opportunity to share 
in the development and assessment of issues 
of accounting interest within a decision- 
making context. Accordingly, the M.S. pro- 
gram is structured to receive its objective 
and direction from the overall objective of 
accounting — providing information useful 
to the process of economic decision making. 

To accomplish this objective, the M.S. pro- 
gram offers a structure of studies designed 
to provide: 

• an examination of the foundations of eco- 
nomic decision making (foundation 
courses, 18 credits); 

• an analysis of the role and usefulness of 
accounting information for economic 
decision making (core courses, 18 credits); 
and 

• an opporttmity for further selected spe- 
cialization from the generally recognized 



branches or divisions of accounting 
inquiry (electives, 6 credits). 

Each student, upon entering the program, 
will be assigned a faculty adviser who will 
assist the student throughout the program of 
study, particularly with the selection of suit- 
able electives. The assigned faculty adviser 
will also act as, or assist in the selection of, 
the student's thesis adviser. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the program 
are expected to hold an undergraduate 
degree from an accredited institution, 
preferably, but not exclusively, in accounting 
or in business administration with a major 
in accounting. Persons holding other than 
the above degrees will be required to take a 
number of selected undergraduate courses. 
Admission is based primarily on an appli- 
cant's undergraduate record; however, the 
promise of academic success is the essential 
factor for admission. In support of their 
applications, persons may submit their 
scores from the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT). An appHcant may 
be required to take this test. 

M.S., Accounting 

A total of 42 credits on the graduate level 
is required for the master of science in 
accounting. In addition, selected undergrad- 
uate courses in accounting may be required 
of students not holding an undergraduate 



36 



degree in accounting. Individual programs 
of study are determined after a conference 
with the coordinator. 

Students are advised to consult the coor- 
dinator as soon as possible after matriculat- 
ing in the program. 

See page 78 for the senior professional 
certificate in accounting. 

Thesis 

All students are required to write a thesis. 
The thesis must show ability to organize 
material in a clear and original manner and 
present well-reasoned conclusions. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply 
with the Graduate School policy on theses as 
well as all specific department requirements. 

Required Courses 

Foundation Courses 

EC 603/Microeconomic Analysis 

EC 604/Macroeconomic Analysis 

FI 61 5/ Finance 

Fl 651 /Portfolio Management and Capital 

Market Analysis 
MG 637/ Management 
QA 604/Probability and Statistics 

Core Courses 

A 61 6 /Taxation for Management 
A 621 /Managerial Accounting, or 

A 661 /Managerial Accounting Seminar 
A 650/Advanced Accounting Theory 
A 654/Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis 
A 698-9/Thesis 1 and II 
Electives (two courses) 
Total Credits 42 

Elective Courses (Select any two 
courses from a specialization.) 

Financial Accounting Specialization 

A 651 /Financial Accounting Seminar 

A 652/Advanced Auditing 

A 653 /Accounting for the Not-for-Profit 

Organization 
FI 649/Security Analysis 

Managerial Accounting Specialization 

A 641 /Accounting Information Systems 



A 642/Operational Auditing 

A 661 /Managerial Accounting Seminar 

FI 645 /Corporate Financial Theory 

Taxation Specialization 

A 601 /Individual Income Taxation 

A 602/Sales and Exchanges of Property 

A 604/Corporate Income Taxation I 

Business 
Administration 

Coordinator: William R. Bockley, Professor 
of Management, Ph.D., Boston College 

The purpose of the M.B.A. program is to 
educate men and women at the graduate 
level for careers in business administration 
as well as other areas requiring a sound 
grasp of business principles. Vital to this 
objective is the development of a manage- 
ment perspective enabling students to see 
the totality of management rather than the 
narrow concerns of the specialist. 

The program has been designed to devel- 
op a professional point of view in managing 
an organization. It further develops the stu- 
dent's ability to utilize the newest analytic 
and quantitative techniques used in corpo- 
rate decision making. The student is also 
exposed to an in-depth analysis of various 
theories of business and managerial behav- 
ior, emphasizing the business organization 
in relation to its internal and external envi- 
ronments. 

Another important aspect of the program 
is to afford the student an opportunity to 
develop special skills by concentrating in a 
given study area. 

Candidates for admission to the M.B.A. 
program are required to hold a baccalaure- 
ate degree from an accredited institution. 
Although admission decisions are based pri- 
marily on students' undergraduate academ- 
ic records, applicants may submit scores 
from the Graduate Management Admission 
Test (GMAT) in support of their applica- 
tions. 



Business Administration 37 



M.B.A. 

A total of 48 credits, with or without a 
thesis, is required of candidates for the 
M.B.A. The curriculum consists of 12 
required core courses and four elective 
courses. The total credits required may be 
reduced by waiver of required courses based 
on the student's undergraduate record or by 
transfer of credits from other accredited 
graduate programs. However, students 
must complete at least 30 graduate credits at 
the University of New Haven to be awarded 
the degree. 

Completion of the elective portion of the 
program may be accomplished by selecting 
courses from a variety of areas, at least two 
of which must be from departments within 
the School of Business. Another option pro- 
vides the opportunity for the student to 
develop special skills by concentrating the 
elective portion of the program in a specific 
area of study. The concentration options are 
described in the pages immediately follow- 
ing this section. 

In appropriate cases having special 
approval, a student may elect to write a the- 
sis. Candidates for the M.B.A. electing to 
write a thesis must register for a minimum 
of six thesis credits in the appropriate busi- 
ness department and would substitute these 
six credits of Thesis I and II for MG 690 and 
one elective course in the program. The the- 
sis must show abihty to organize material in 
a clear and original manner and must pre- 
sent well-reasoned conclusions. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply 
with the Graduate School pohcy on theses as 
well as all specific department requirements. 

In order to become fully matriculated in 
the M.B.A. program, students who are 
admitted provisionally must complete, with 
satisfactory grades as specified in the letter 
of acceptance, the following courses before 
enrolling in elective courses: QA604 and any 
three other required core courses for which 
the prerequisites have been met. (Refer to 
the course descriptions elsewhere in this cat- 
alog for course prerequisites.) 

Students entering the M.B.A. program 
who lack adequate preparation in account- 
ing, economics or quantitative techniques 



may be required to enroll in a maximum of 
three graduate-level, non-credit courses 
(A600 Accounting, EC600 Basic Economics, 
QA600 Quantitative Analysis) in order to 
satisfy prerequisite requirements. Adequate 
preparation is defined as satisfactory com- 
pletion of the following undergraduate cred- 
its with grades of "C" or better: six credit 
hours of accounting, three credit hours of 
economics and six credit hours of quantita- 
tive techniques or mathematics. 

Students in the M.B.A. program are 
expected to be familiar with, or become 
familiar with, the use of computers in solv- 
ing problems. The use of a computer is 
required in a number of courses in the 
M.B.A. curriculum. 

Required Courses 

A 621 /Managerial Accounting 

EC 603/Microeconomic Analysis 

EC 604/Macroeconomic Analysis 

EC 625' /Industrial Relations 

FI 61 5/ Finance 

IB 643/International Business 

MG 637^/Management 

MG 685VResearch Methods in Business 

Administration 
MG 690VResearch Project 
MK 609/Marketing 
P 619/Organizational Behavior 
QA 604 /Probability and Statistics 
Electives (four courses) 
Total credits 48 

'Students enrolled in the finance concentration take either IB 
643 (preferred) or EC 625 (with the adviser's approi>al); cred- 
it for only one of these two courses will be counted toward the 
M.B.A. degree with the finance concentration. Waiver of EC 
625 does not excuse finance concentration students from tak- 
ing the required course IB 643. 

■Students enrolled in the health care management and the 
health care marketing concentrations take MG 640 in place of 
MG 637. 

'Students enrolled in the finance concentration take Fl 616 in 
place of MG 685. 

'Students enrolled in the finance concentration take either 
FI 646 or FI 647 in place ofMG 690. 

Waiver Policy 

Required core courses in the M.B.A. pro- 
gram may be waived on the basis of under- 
graduate courses taken at accredited 



38 



institutions. Waivers will be considered at 
the time of the admission decision. Students 
who seek additional waivers must submit a 
written request (with a description of the 
previously completed coursework) to the 
M.B.A. coordinator, who will review and act 
on the waiver request. Only courses with 
grades of "B" or better may be used in 
meeting waiver guidelines for the required 
courses. Only required core courses may be 
waived. No waivers will be granted for 
either MG 685 or MG 690. 

A course that has been waived may not 
be taken for or used for elective credits. No 
tuition refund or cancellation will be issued 
for courses taken and subsequently waived. 

Waiver Guidelines 

A 621: Twelve credit hours of accounting, 
including at least three credit hours of 
managerial /cost accounting. 

EC 603: An intermediate microeconomics 
course, such as EC 340 at the University 
of New Haven. 

EC 604: An intermediate macroeconomics 
course, such as EC 341 at the University 
of New Haven. 

EC 625: A course in labor economics and /or 
labor-management relations. 

Fl 615: Undergraduate degree in finance or 
12 credit hours of finance, of which at 
least six credit hours are in financial man- 
agement. 

IB 643: Six credit hours of international busi- 
ness, international marketing, interna- 
tional finance, or international economics. 

MG 637: Nine credit hours of management. 

MK 609: Nine credit hours of marketing, 
including three credit hours of marketing 
management. 

P 619: Twelve credit hours in psychology, 
with at least six credit hours primarily 
concerned with topics such as attitude 
development and change, group process- 
es, industrial psychology, organizational 
conflict and supervisory behavior. 

QA 604: Six credit hours of quantitative 
analysis, business mathematics or college- 
level mathematics plus introductory-level 
and intermediate-level probability and 
statistics courses. 



Concentrations 

Within the M.B.A. program students may 
use the elective credits to concentrate their 
studies in a specific area. The available con- 
centrations and their course requirements 
are listed below. Most concentrations consist 
of 12 credits. With the permission of the 
adviser, students may substitute other 
appropriate courses for those listed as part 
of the concentration. It is recommended, but 
not required, that concentrations be indicat- 
ed on the application for admission to the 
M.B.A. program, or as soon as possible 
thereafter. 

The concentrations in finance, health care 
management and health care marketing 
have special requirements which affect the 
required core curriculum. In addition, stu- 
dents enrolling in hotel and restaurant man- 
agement and tourism and travel 
administration who lack appropriate aca- 
demic backgrounds and/or industry experi- 
ence will be required to take one basic 
overview course (HR 600 or TT 600) and /or 
complete a 500-hour practicum in their 
respective fields as part of their graduate 
programs. Students should consult the con- 
centration descriptions and contact the 
appropriate adviser for additional informa- 
tion. 

Concentration in Accounting 

Concentration Adviser: Robert G. 
McDonald, Associate Professor of 
Accounting, M.B.A., New York 
University; C.M.A., C.I.A., C.RA., C.RA. 

The concentration in the accounting 
program is recommended to those M.B.A. 
students who desire an accounting special- 
ization but do not have an undergraduate 
accounting degree. Students who wish to 
take the Certified Public Accounting exami- 
nation or the Certified Management 
Accounting examination should enroll in the 
M.S. in accounting program. 



M.B.A. Concentrations 39 



A 616/Taxation for Management 

A 650/Advanced Accounting Theory 

A 661 /Managerial Accounting Seminar 

Plus any accounting or taxation elective 

Total credits 12 

See page 78 for the senior professional 
certificate in accounting. 

Concentration in Business 
Policy and Strategy 

Concentration Adviser: Robert W. Baeder, 
Professor of Management, Ph.D., Ohio 
State University 

The concentration in business policy and 
strategy is designed to prepare managers to 
deal with the increasing emphasis given by 
companies to the development and imple- 
mentation of innovative global business 
strategies. The program focuses on strategic 
concepts and processes and relates them to 
general management and functional super- 
vision. A grounding in formulation of busi- 
ness policy and strategy for both internal 
growth and growth by mergers and acquisi- 
tions is provided. 

MG 655/Advanced Business Strategy 
MG 669*/ Advanced Business Policy 

Plus two of the following: 

FI 620/Working Capital Management and 

Planning 
IB 652 /Multinational Business Management 
MG 638 /Cost Benefit Management 
MG 680/Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
MK 638 /Competitive Marketing Strategy 
MK 643/Product Management 
Total credits 12 

*Students who have had appropriate prerequisites may sub- 
stitute CO 643 Telecommunications Policy and Strategy for 
MG 669. 

Concentration in Computer 
and Information Science 

Concentration Adviser: Roger G. Frey 
Professor of Computer Science, Ph.D., 
Yale University 



This concentration provides coverage of 
programming and systems with a business 
systems emphasis, preparing the student to 
carry out systems studies and to interact 
knowledgeably with programmers and 
computer systems specialists. 

Students who have not had previous 
instruction in computer programming are 
required to complete CS 602 Computing 
Fundamentals (on an excess credit basis) 
before enrolling in the programming lan- 
guage courses in this concentration. 

Option 1: 

CS 605/COBOL Programmmg 

CS 605B/Advanced Business Programming 

Option 2: 

CS 606/FORTRAN Programming 

CS 606B/Advanced Technical Programming 

Option 3: 

CS 603/Pascal Programming 
CS 620/Data Structures 

Plus two of the following: 

CS 616/Assembly Language 

CS 622/Database Systems* 

CS 624/Software Engineering* 

CS 648/Computer Systems Analysis 

and Selection 
IE 604 /Management Systems 
Total credits 12 

*Prerequisites are CS 603 and CS 620 (Option 3). 

See page 79 for the senior professional 
certificate in computer and information sci- 



Concentration in Finance 

Concentration Adviser: Edward A. Downe, 
Associate Professor of Finance, Ph.D., 
New School for Social Research 

The goal of the finance concentration is to 
prepare individuals for the expanding sector 
of financial services and modem corporate 
financial management. The program stresses 
the understanding of the conceptual founda- 



40 



tions of finance and the use of analytic tech- 
niques. Special emphasis is placed on the 
implications and applications of these con- 
cepts and techniques. 

Finance concentration students will take 
either IB 643 (preferred) or EC 625 (with the 
adviser's approval) in the required core cur- 
riculum; credit for only one of these two 
courses will be counted toward the M.B.A. 
degree with the finance concentration. 
Waiver of EC 625 does not excuse finance 
concentration students from taking the 
required course IB 643. Electives in this con- 
centration are to be chosen in consultation 
with the finance adviser. It is strongly rec- 
ommended that students contact the finance 
adviser as early as possible to plan the 
appropriate sequence of courses. A recom- 
mended course sequencing for students 
interested in preparing for the Certified 
Financial Analyst (C.F.A.) examination is 
available from the finance adviser. 

FI 616/Applied Research Techniques for 
Financial Operations and Financial 
Market Analysis (this course to be taken 
in place of MG 685 in the core of the 
M.B.A. program) 

FI 61 7/ Financial Institutions and Capital 
Markets 

FI 645/Corporate Financial Theory 

FI 646/Advanced Capital Market Issues, or 
FI 647/Advanced Corporate Financial 
Management Issues (to be taken in place 
of MG 690 in the core of the M.B.A. pro- 
gram) 

FI 651/PortfoHo Management and Capital 
Market Analysis 

Plus two of the follozving* 

A 654/Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis 
FI 619/Monetary and Central Banking 

Policy 
FI 620/Working Capital Management and 

Planning 
FI 644 /International Financial Management 
FI 649/Security Analysis 
FI 655/Speculative Market Analysis 
FI 661 /Real Estate: Principles and Practices 
FI 670/Selected Topics 



n 698/Thesis I* 
n 699/Thesis II* 
Total credits 



21 



*Candidates who elect not to write a thesis must substitute, 
with written approval, two elective courses. Elective courses 
are to be chosen in consultation mth the finance adviser. 

See page 79 for the senior professional 
certificate in finance. 

Concentration in Health Care 
Management 

Concentration Adviser: Charles Coleman, 
Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, M.P.A., West Virginia 
University 

The concentration in health care manage- 
ment is designed for those individuals cur- 
rently in or those who anticipate a career in 
health care management. Courses are 
designed to provide students with the con- 
ceptual and practical skills necessary for the 
management of a health care organization. 

MG 640 /Management of Health Care 
Organizations (this course to be taken in 
place of MG 637 in the core of the M.B.A. 
program) 

Plus four of the following: 

PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 642 /Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 643 /Health and Institutional Planning 
PA 644/ Administration of Programs and 

Services for the Aged 
PA 645/Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 646/Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 647/ Alternative Health Care DeHvery 

Systems 
PA 648/Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 670VSelected Topics 
PS 635/Law and Public Health 
Total credits 12 

*R4 670 Selected Topics may he taken more than once. 



M.B.A. Concentrations 41 



Concentration in Health Care 
Marketing 

Concentration Advisen Charles Coleman, 
Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, M.P.A., West Virginia 
University 

The concentration in health care market- 
ing is designed to provide students with the 
communications, marketing and public rela- 
tions skills necessary to compete successful- 
ly as marketing professionals in a variety of 
health care environments. Students will be 
taught to identify and analyze variables 
which affect communication and public rela- 
tions, to design health care marketing plans 
and to implement marketing strategy within 
health care organizations. 

MG 640 /Management of Health Care 
Organizations (this course to be taken in 
place of MG 637 in the core of the M.B.A. 
program) 

CO 621 /Managerial Communication 

MK 638 /Competitive Marketing Strategy 

MK 641 /Marketing Management 

Phis one of the following: 

CO 631 /Public Information Dynamics 
CO 632 /Contemporary Public Relations 

Issues 
Total credits 12 

Concentration in Hotel and 
Restaurant Management 

See page 60 for program description and 
content. 

Concentration in Human 
Resources Management 

Concentration Adviser: Judith A. Neal, 
Associate Professor of Management, 
Ph.D., Yale University 

This concentration is designed for the 
personnel professional or the individual in 
another field who aspires to work in person- 
nel. It provides an overview of the field and 



an opportunity to study various subfunc- 
tions (such as training, industrial relations 
or compensation) in greater depth. 

MG 645/Management of Human Resources 
MG 678/Personnel Management Seminar 

Plus two of the following: 

EC 627/Economics of Labor Relations 

EC 687/ Collective Bargaining 

MG 664/Organizational Effectiveness 

MG 665 /Compensation Administration 

MG 679/Industrial Relations Seminar 

P 627/ Attitude and Opinion Measurement 

P 628/The Interview 

P 641 /Personnel Development and Training 

Total credits 12 

See page 81 for the senior professional 
certificate in human resources management. 

Concentration in International 
Business 

Concentration Adviser: Michael Kublin, 
Associate Professor of Marketing and 
International Business, Ph.D., New York 
University 

This concentration is designed to prepare 
managers to deal with the latest methods of 
analysis related to international business. 
These include the basic techniques and skills, 
such as adapting to new political and cultural 
environments, which are not normally cov- 
ered by traditional courses. It is strongly 
recommended that students contact the inter- 
national business adviser as early as possible 
to plan the appropriate sequence of courses. 

PI 644 /International Financial Management 

Plus three of the following: 

EC 641 /International Economics 

IB 645 /Comparative International Business 

Environments 
IB 651 /International Marketing 
IB 652 /Multinational Business Management 
IB 660/East and Southeast Asian Business 

Systems 



42 



IB 661 /Investment Strategies for Developing 

Countries 
MG 660/Comparative Management 
Total credits 12 

See page 81 for the senior professional 
certificate in international business. 

Concentration in Logistics 

Concentration Adviser: Alexis N. Sommers, 
Professor of Industrial Engineering, 
Ph.D., Purdue University 

Although an old field of study tradition- 
ally associated with the military, logistics 
has emerged as an important management 
specialty in organizations deaUng with com- 
plex systems and large, multiphase projects. 
Logistics is the modem science of making 
sure that needs are met when they occur, at 
a reasonable resource expenditure. This 
necessitates customer requirements plan- 
ning, design-to-cost concepts, optimal sys- 
tem acquisition, life cycle analysis, 
transportation and distribution, and field 
support networks. Especially in defense 
industries, logistics is essential in designing, 
acquiring and introducing new weapons 
systems, new communication and supply 
systems and advanced production and dis- 
tribution concepts. The logistics concentra- 
tion provides a basic working knowledge of 
the discipline and gives a background for 
certification in the area. 

LG 660 /Logistics Technology and 
Management 

Plus three of the following: 

IE 615/Transportation and Distribution 
LG 663 /Logistics Management in the 

System Acquisition Process 
LG 665 /Integrated Logistics Support 

Analysis 
LG 669/Life Cycle Cost Analysis 
MG 638/Cost Benefit Management 
Total credits 12 

See page 89 for the professional certifi- 
cates in logistics. 



Concentration in Long-Term 
Health Care 

Concentration Adviser: Charles Coleman, 
Assistant Professor of Public 
Administration, M.P.A., West Virginia 
University 

This program is approved by the 
Department of Health Services, State of 
Connecticut, as a course of study in long- 
term health care. Students who complete 
these concentration courses are eligible to 
take the state licensing examination for 
long-term care administration, preparing 
individuals for participation in this area of 
expanding opportunities for health care 
practitioners. 

In the following sequence, PA 646 must 
be taken before or concurrently with PA 681; 
PA 682 must be taken after PA 681 and PA 
646. No waivers, substitutions or transfer 
credits will be permitted in this concentra- 
tion. 

PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 646/Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 681 /Long-Term Health Care Internship I 
PA 682 /Long-Term Health Care Internship II 
Total credits 12 



Concentration in Management 
and Organization 

Concentration Adviser: Abbas Nadim, 
Associate Professor of Management, 
Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 

The concentration in management and 
organization is designed to develop stu- 
dents' conceptual knowledge and skills in 
formulating corporate strategy. The program 
focuses on concepts and processes useful in 
relation to general management and func- 
tional responsibilities in coordinating and 
directing the organizational effort in our 
ever-changing and complex economic envi- 
ronment. 



M.B.A. Concentrations 43 



Any four of the following: 

LA 673/Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 
MG 638/Cost Benefit Management 
MG 645/Management of Human Resources 
MG 655/Advanced Business Strategy 
MG 660/Comparative Management 
MG 661 /Development of Management 

Thought 
MG 662/Organization Theory 
MG 663/Leadership in Organizations 
MG 664/Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 669/Advanced Business Policy 
MG 680 /Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
Total credits 12 

See page 80 for the senior professional 
certificate in general management. 

Concentration in Management 
Science 

Concentration Adviser: William Pan, 

Professor of Quantitative Analysis, Ph.D., 
Columbia University 

This concentration gives the student the 
quantitative knowledge and skills needed 
by managers in changing technologically 
oriented organizations. It reinforces and 
improves the manager's information pro- 
cessing and decision-making skills. 

Any four of the following: 

EC 653 /Econometrics 
IE 601 /Introduction to Operations 
Research /Management Science 
IE 604/Management Systems 
MG 638/Cost Benefit Management 
QA 606 /Advanced Management Science 
QA 607 /Forecasting 
Total credits 12 

See page 80 for the senior professional 
certificate in general management. 



Concentration in Marketing 

Concentration Adviser: David J. Morris, Jr, 
Associate Professor of Marketing, Ph.D., 
Syracuse University 

The concentration in marketing allows 
the student to develop analytic skills and a 
deeper understanding of marketing phe- 
nomena. Specific emphasis is given to the 
development of content knowledge and 
skills necessary for operating managers of 
the marketing function. 

MK 639 /Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 
MK 641 /Marketing Management 

Plus two of the following: 

IB 651 /International Marketing 

MG 669/Advanced Business Policy 

MK 61 6 /Buyer Behavior 

MK 638 /Competitive Marketing Strategy 

MK 643/Product Management 

MK 645 /Distribution Strategy 

MK 670/Selected Topics 

MK 680 /Marketing Workshop 

Total credits 12 

See page 81 for the senior professional 
certificate in marketing. 

Concentration in Operations 
Research 

Concentration Adviser: Ira H. Kleinfeld, 
Professor of Industrial Engineering, 
Eng.Sc.D., Columbia University 

Operations research involves the appUca- 
tion of quantitative methods to problem 
solving in business and industry and in mat- 
ters of public policy. These courses cover 
several of the most widely used techniques 
of operations research. 

IE 607/Probability Theory 

IE 621 /Linear Programming 

IE 622/Queueing Theory 

IE 686 /Inventory Analysis 

Total credits 12 



44 



Concentration in Public 
Relations 

Concentration Adviser: Jerry L. Allen, 
Professor of Communication, Ph.D., 
Southern Illinois University 

The concentration in public relations is 
designed to orient managers to and prepare 
public relations practitioners for the many 
demands placed on public and private cor- 
porations and state and local governments. 
The program focuses on theory, media rela- 
tions and contemporary issues affecting 
business and the public. 

CO 621 /Managerial Communication 

CO 631 /Public Information Dynamics 

CO 632/Contemporary Public Relations Issues 

Phis one of the foUoiving: 

CO 601 /Basics of Business Media 

Production Techniques 
CO 609 /Scripting the Media Presentation 
EC 629 /Public Policies Toward Business 
MG 680/Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
MK 639 /Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 
P 638 /Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 
Total credits 12 

Concentration in 
Telecommunications 

Concentration Adviser: Jerry L. Allen, 
Professor of Communication, Ph.D., 
Southern Illinois University 

The concentration in telecommunications 
management is designed to prepare man- 
agers to deal with this fast-changing, high- 
technology field in positions with end users 
of telecommunications equipment, competi- 
tive long-distance common carriers or regu- 
lated local-exchange telephone companies. 
The program focuses on concepts and pro- 
cesses useful in relation to general manage- 
ment and functional supervision, while 



providing a grounding in the broad business 
aspects of the field. 

CO 640* /Communication Technologies 
CO 642 /Management of Telecommurucation 

Organizations 
CO 643/Telecommunications Policy and 

Strategy 

Plus one of the following: 

CO 621 /Managerial Communication 
CO 641 /Competition and Regulation in 

Telecommunications 
CS 642/Computer Networks and Data 

Communication 
LA 673/Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 
MG 638/Cost Benefit Management 
MG 680/Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
Total credits 12 

"Students who liave had the equivalent of CO 640, either 
through xcork experience or educational courses given by a 
common carrier, may substitute another course from the elec- 
tive list subject to the approval of the concentration adz'iser. 

Concentration in Tourism and 
Travel Administration 

See page 76 for program description and 
content. 



Business 
Administrationy 
Industrial Engineering 
Dual Degree Program 

Coordinator: Ira H. Kleinfeld, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Eng.Sc.D., 
Columbia University 

The Graduate School has always encour- 
aged interdisciplinary studies. To foster a 
broader expertise in the areas of business 
administration and industrial engineering, a 
student can earn degrees in both fields by 
successfully completing this dual degree 



program. 

The program is intended for students 
with undergraduate engineering or techni- 
cal degrees from programs accredited by the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology. AppUcants with degrees in 
fields other than industrial engineering will 
be required to take a number of undergrad- 
uate courses or otherwise demonstrate profi- 
ciency in several areas normally included in 
an industrial engineering program. 

M.B.A./M.S.I.E. Dual Degree 

The M.B.A./M.S.I.E. program consists of 
72 credit hours. Up to 12 of these credit 
hours may be waived on the basis of under- 
graduate course work, leaving a minimum 
requirement of 60 credit hours. All waivers 
must be approved in writing by the appro- 
priate department and are conditional upon 
subsequent academic performance. 
Graduate credit may be transferred from 
other accredited institutions subject to the 
Graduate School pohcy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 

In all cases, the residency requirement for 
the two degrees shall be 60 credit hours 
completed at the University of New Haven. 

Research Project/Thesis 
Requirement 

All students in the dual degree program 
must complete the required business admin- 
istration MG 690 Research Project course 
listed in the program. In addition, all dual 
degree students must complete an industrial 
engineering special project or thesis within 
the elective portion of the program. The 
industrial engineering special project 
requirement may be satisfied by taking a 
project course in a group setting when these 
are offered. A designated area of study may 
be indicated for each such industrial engi- 
neering project course; in these cases, the 
instructor will offer direction in the area and 
will assist students in the development of 
substantial individual projects. Particular 
requirements or prerequisites may be set for 
the course or for those individuals intending 
to complete a project. In appropriate cases 



M.B.A./M.S.I.E. Dual Degree 45 

having special approval, a student may take 
a Research Project or Thesis (as listed in the 
catalog) on an individual basis. 

Required Courses 

A 621 /Managerial Accounting 
CS 606/FORTRAN Programming 
EC 603/Microeconomic Analysis 
EC 604/Macroeconomic Analysis 
EC 625 /Industrial Relations 
FI 61 5 /Finance 
IB 643/International Business 
IE 601 /Introduction to Operations 

Research /Management Science 
IE 607/ Probability Theory 
IE 609/Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 
IE 623/Decision Analysis 
IE 624/QuaUty Analysis 
IE 651 /Human Engineering I 
IE 655/Manufacturing Analysis 
IE 681 /System Simulation 
IE 686/Inventory Analysis 
IE 688/Design of Experiments 
MG 637/Management 
MG 685/Research Methods in Business 

Administration 
MG 690/Research Project 
MK 609/Marketing 
P 619/Organi2ational Behavior, or 

P 620 /Industrial Psychology 
Approved Electives (two courses) 
Total credits 72 



Business 
Administration/ 
Public Administration 
Dual Degree Program 

Coordinator: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 



The M.B.A./M.P.A. dual degree program 
is designed for those students whose inter- 
ests or career objectives are focused at both 
the public and private sectors of the econo- 



46 



my. The program broadly stresses the use of 
management skills and analytic techniques 
applied to business, industrial, governmen- 
tal and not-for-profit organizations. 

M.B.A./M.P.A. Dual Degree 

The M.B.A./M.P.A. program consists of 
72 credit hours. Up to 12 of these credit 
hours may be waived on the basis of under- 
graduate coursework, leaving a minimum 
requirement of 60 credit hours. All waivers 
must be approved in writing by the appro- 
priate department and are conditional upon 
subsequent academic performance. 

Graduate credit may be transferred from 
other accredited institutions subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. In all 
cases, the residency requirement for the two 
degrees shall be 60 credit hours completed 
at the University of New Haven. In addi- 
tion, a minimum of 21 credit hours must be 
earned in business courses and a minimum 
of 21 credit hours must be earned in pubhc 
administration courses. 



Thesis 

All students must write a thesis. The the- 
sis must show ability to organize material in 
a clear and original manner and present 
well-reasoned conclusions. Thesis prepara- 
tion and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 

Required Courses 

A 621 /Managerial Accounting 
EC 603/Microeconomic Analysis 
EC 604/Macroeconomic Analysis, or 

EC 608 /Economics for Public 
Administrators 
EC 625/Industrial Relations 
FI 61 5 /Finance 
IB 643/International Business 
MG 637/Management 
MK 609 /Marketing 

PA 601 /Principles of Public Administration 
PA 602/Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 



PA 604 /Communities and Social Change 
PA 611 /Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620 /Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
PA 625/Administrative Behavior, or 

P 619/Organizational Behavior 
PA 632 /Public Finance and Budgeting 
QA 604/Probabihty and Statistics 
Pubhc Administration Electives 

(three courses) 
Business Electives (three courses) 
Thesis I and II 
Total credits 72 



Community 
Psychology 



Coordinator: Robert J. Hoffnung, Professor 
of Psychology, Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati 

Community psychology appHes the theo- 
ries and techniques of psychology and relat- 
ed social sciences to understanding and 
modifying the complex social forces which 
influence individual and community well- 
being. 

Accordingly, the M.A. program in com- 
munity psychology provides broad training 
in current approaches to preventing and 
treating psychological distress at the level of 
social institutions, organizations and groups 
rather than just the individual. Methods of 
community analysis, consultation and crisis 
intervention are considered as well as pro- 
gram development, administration and 
evaluation. 

Classroom study is closely integrated 
with supervised field experiences in a vari- 
ety of human service organizations and 
community settings. 

Graduates are able to assume positions of 
responsibility in a broad range of human 
service settings, such as mental health pro- 
grams, youth service bureaus, community 
houses, child development programs, 
municipal services, halfway houses, senior 
citizen centers, private agencies, health care 
systems and community action programs. 



Admission Policy 

An undergraduate degree from an 
accredited institution is required. A major in 
psychology is preferred but not required. 
However, all students are expected to have 
at least an introductory-level understanding 
of psychological concepts, principles and 
methods before entering. Students 
who have not had an undergraduate course 
in statistical methods will be required to 
take one before entry into P 609. Related 
work experience as well as academic perfor- 
mance is considered in admission decisions. 

Along with the application materials 
required by the Graduate School, applicants 
may be asked to submit a questionnaire. 
Applicants may be required to submit scores 
from either the Miller Analogies Test or the 
Graduate Record Examination Aptitude 
Test, at the discretion of the department. 
Students intending to go on for further 
graduate work are strongly encouraged to 
take the GRE early in their first year of study 
in the master's program. 

Fieldwork and Seminars 

Supervised field experience in a variety of 
settings is a major vehicle through which 
students in the program develop applied 
skills. Students plan their fieldwork activi- 
ties in collaboration with both the program's 
field training director and their supervisors 
from the field setting. Field experience is 
provided in the areas of individual interven- 
tion, consultation and systems intervention. 
Students with a year or more of appropriate 
full-time human service experience in a par- 
ticular fieldwork area will be allowed to 
substitute an elective course for the field- 
work course in that area, contingent upon 
the approval of the community psychology 
program coordinator. 

In addition to the fieldwork, three sepa- 
rate seminar courses provide a theoretical 
and research framework within which the 
development of these applied skills will be 
examined and discussed. These seminars 
enable students to conceptualize the issues 
encountered in the field within a broader 
context. A comprehensive project report is 



Community Psychology 47 

required in which the student will analyze 
and integrate fieldwork experience with rel- 
evant research and coursework. 

Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis as 
part of the program of study. The thesis 
must show ability to organize materials in a 
clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. A thesis is strongly 
recommended for students wishing to pur- 
sue doctoral training after graduation. 
Thesis preparation and submission must 
comply with the Graduate School policy on 
theses as well as all specific department 
requirements. 

M.A., Community Psychology 

The program consists of 42 credit hours, 
21 of which comprise the core curriculum 
completed by all students and 12 of which 
constitute one of three areas of concentra- 
tion. Typically, students complete most of 
the core requirements before focusing on the 
concentrations. 

Required Courses 

P 605 /Survey of Community Psychology 

P 609/Research Methods 

P 610/Program Evaluation 

P 612/Consultation Seminar 

P 615/Consultation Fieldwork 

P 611 /Individual Intervention Seminar, or 

P 613/Systems Intervention Seminar 
P 614/Individual Intervention Fieldwork, or 

P 616/Systems Intervention Fieldwork 
Electives (three courses) 
Concentration (four courses) 
Total credits 42 

Concentration in Community- 
Clinical Services 

The community-clinical services concen- 
tration is designed to prepare students for 
careers in clinical, mental health and related 
human service settings. Direct work with 
individuals within the social and communi- 
ty contexts in which they live as well as con- 
sultation, social problem analysis, and 



48 



prevention techniques and strategies are 
stressed. 

P 625 /Life Span Developmental Psychology 

P 628/The Interview 

P 629/Introduction to Psychotherapy and 

Counseling 
P 632/Group Dynamics and Group 

Treatment 
Total credits 12 

Concentration in Mental 
Retardation Services 

The concentration in mental retardation 
services is designed to prepare professionals 
who will work in public or private residen- 
tial facilities for mentally retarded adults. 
Training in life skills through the use of 
behavior modification techniques is an 
important part of such work, and the con- 
centration provides intensive training in 
behavior modification in two courses and in 
the two fieldwork experiences. 

P 621 /Behavior Modification I: Principles, 

Theories and Applications 
P 622/Behavior Modification 11: Advanced 

Theory, Assessment and Application in 

Mental Retardation Settings 
P 625 /Life Span Developmental Psychology 
P 637/ Mental Retardation: History, Theory 

and Practice 
Total credits 12 

See page 90 for the professional certificate 
in mental retardation services. 

Concentration in Program 
Development 

The program development concentration 
is designed to prepare students for careers 
which emphasize the administration of tra- 
ditional and nontraditional programs and 
services. The concentration involves plan- 
ning, development and evaluation of inno- 
vative approaches to treatment and 
prevention at the community, organizational 
and social systems levels in the public and 
private human service sectors as well as in 
business and industry. 



P 619/Organizational Behavior 

P 628/The Interview 

PA 604/Communities and Social Change 

PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 
Care Organizations, or 
PA 643/Health and Institutional 
Planning 

Total credits 12 

Computer and 
Information Science 

Coordinator: Roger G. Frey, Professor of 
Computer Science, Ph.D., Yale Uruversity 

This program provides advanced profes- 
sional training in computer and information 
science, and offers to students a diversity of 
subject matter through its concentrations as 
well as through a wide range of course offer- 
ings. Its broad scope recognizes the rapid 
development of computing disciphnes and 
applications, and allows students to prepare 
for this. The program can be used to enter, 
or advance in, the computing profession or 
an allied field, along a variety of career 
paths. It may also be used to prepare for fur- 
ther graduate study. 

Excellent computing facilities are avail- 
able for use by students in the program. In 
addition to the resources of the university's 
Computer Center and personal computer 
laboratory, students enrolled in the comput- 
er science program and courses may use the 
computing facilities of the School of 
Enigneering Computer-Aided Engineering 
Center as well as the computer science and 
engineering microcomputer laboratory. 

M.S., Computer and 
Information Science 

The program consists of 48 credit hours of 
coursework. This may be reduced in some 
situations through waivers or transfer cred- 
its, in conformity with Graduate School and 
program policies. The six core courses are 
eligible for waiver; concentration courses 
and electives may not be waived, but trans- 
fer credit and substitution may apply. 



Candidates needing more background may 
be advised or required to take additional 
courses. In particular, CS 602 Computing 
Fundamentals is often used for this pur- 
pose; this course may be counted as a free 
elective within the program. Other courses 
added in this manner normally will have to 
be taken in addition to the program require- 
ments. 

The Pascal programming language will 
be the common teaching language used 
throughout the program. Use of, and pro- 
gramming in, Pascal may be required in all 
but the most introductory courses. 

A core of six courses is required of all stu- 
dents in the program. Five more courses are 
taken in a concentration. A student must 
take courses that will satisfy one of the pro- 
gram's concentrations, but a formal declara- 
tion of concentration is not required until 
the student petitions to graduate. The 
remaining five courses in the program are 
electives: three restricted electives and two 
free electives. A project, as described below, 
must be completed as part of the program 
coursework. 

In general, students are free to select their 
own courses in conformity with program 
requirements and course prerequisites, 
which should be followed carefully. It 
should be noted that the Graduate School 
may deny credit for a course taken without 
first satisfying its prerequisites, unless prior 
written approval has been obtained. 

The graduate coordinator will evaluate 
the content of selected topics, independent 
studies, seminar project courses and new 
course offerings and will maintain a current 
list of such computing-related courses suit- 
able as restricted electives in the program. 

Free electives courses are taken from the 
set of graduate courses at the University of 
New Haven and should bear a reasonable 
relation to the student's overall program 
and career objectives. 

Project/Thesis Requirement 

Within the program's 16 courses, a stu- 
dent must complete a thesis or an appropri- 
ate special project. The special project 
requirement may be satisfied by taking a 



Computer and Information Science 49 

project course; in these cases, the instructor 
will offer direction in the area and will assist 
students in the development of substantial 
individual projects. Particular requirements 
or prerequisites may be set for the course or 
for those individuals intending to complete 
a project. In appropriate cases having special 
approval, students may elect to write a the- 
sis or take a project course (as listed in the 
catalog) on an individual basis; generally, 
however, the project course given in a group 
setting will be used to meet the project 
requirement. A form certifying that the pro- 
ject requirement has been satisfied must be 
submitted to the Graduate Records Office 
upon completion. 

Required Courses 

CS 603 /Pascal Programming 

CS 616/Assembly Language 

CS 620/Data Structures 

CS 622/Database Systems 

CS 624/Software Engineering 

M 610/Fundamentals of Calculus 

Concentration (five courses) 

Restricted Electives (three courses) 

Free Electives (two courses) 

Total credits 48 

The project requirement must be complet- 
ed within the above 48 credits of required 
coursework. 

Restricted Electives 

Restricted electives include all courses 
Usted in any of the concentrations (or their 
course classifications) and the following: 

CS 622B/Advanced Database Systems 

CS 670VSelected Topics 

CS 690VProject 

CS 695 V Independent Study I 

CS 696V Independent Study II 

EE 640/Computer Engineering 

EE 670* /Selected Topics 

IE 614/Data Information Systems 

IE 623/Decision Analysis 

M 670*/Selected Topics 

'Graduate coordinator must approzv these courses for use as 
restricted electives. 



50 



Concentration Course Classifications 

The following classification of courses is 
used in the definitions of the three program 
concentrations. 

Advanced Computing Applications 
Courses 

CS 621 /Applied Algorithms 

CS 650 /Computer Graphics 

CS 650B/ Advanced Computer Graphics 

CS 660/Artificial InteUigence 

CS 662/Expert Systems 

CS 664/Neural Networks 

IE 681 /System Simulation 

Computer Structures and Systems Courses 

CS 640/Computer Organization 

CS 642/Computer Networks and Data 

Communication 
CS 646/Data Parallel Programming 
EE 615/lntroduction to Computer Logic 
EE 658/ Microprocessors — Theory and 

Applications 

Computing Theory Courses 

CS 630/Computing Theory 
CS 632/Theory of Algorithms 

Analytic Methods Courses 

IE 607/ Probability Theory 

IE 609 /Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 

IE 621 /Linear Programming 

IE 622/Queueing Theory 

IE 625/Advanced Mathematical 

Programming 
IE 685/Theory of Optimization 
IE 687/Stochastic Processes 
M 615/Linear Mathematics and 

Combinatorics 
M 616/Applied Modem Algebra for 

Computer Science 
M 620 /Numerical Analysis 
M 624 /Applied Mathematics 
M 632/Methods of Complex Analysis 

Programming Language Courses 

CS 604/APL Programming 

CS 605/COBOL Programming 

CS 605B/Advanced Business Programming 

CS 606/ FORTRAN Programming 

CS 606B/ Advanced Technical Programming 



CS 607/ LISP Programming 

CS 610/C Language Programming 

CS 61 2 /Ada Programming 

Systems Software Courses 

CS 636/Structure of Programming 

Languages 
CS 638/Compiler Design 
CS 644 /Operating Systems 
CS 644B/Advanced Operating Systems 

Concentrations 

Concentration in 
Applications Software 

The concentration in applications soft- 
ware focuses on skills needed for the design 
and implementation of software for the end 
user in a broad range of application areas. 

One Computing Theory course 

One Programming Language course 

One Analytic Methods course 

One Advanced Computing Apphcations 

course 
One Systems Software course 
Total credits 15 

Concentration in Management 
Information Systems 

The concentration in management infor- 
mation systems is designed primarily for 
data system managers, systems analysts and 
others involved with the integration, man- 
agement or executive oversight of comput- 
ing systems in organizations. 

One Computing Theory course 
One Programming Language course 
One Advanced Computing Applications 



Plus the following: 

CS 648/Computer Systems Analysis and 

Selection 
IE 601 /Introduction to Operations 

Research /Management Science 
Total credits 15 



Concentration in Systems 
Software 

The concentration in systems software is 
intended for the individual interested in the 
software which comprises the computing 
system itself and those programs closely 
associated with the system, such as lan- 
guage translators. 

One Computing Theory course 
One Programming Language course 
One Computer Structures and Systems 



Plus the following: 

CS 638 /Compiler Design 

CS 644 /Operating Systems 

Total credits 15 



Criminal Justice 51 

analysis and the contribution of systems 
analysis to the efficient administration of the 
criminal justice system. 

M.S., Criminal Justice 

A total of 45 credit hours is required of 
candidates for the degree of master of sci- 
ence in criminal justice. 

Candidates must complete the core cur- 
riculum. After consultation with an adviser, 
students select electives from approved 
courses in the departments of criminal jus- 
tice, economics, psychology, political sci- 
ence, sociology, industrial engineering and 
management science. 

The transfer of credit from other institu- 
tions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 



Criminal Justice 

Coordinator: William M. Norton, Associate 
Professor of Criminal Justice, Ph.D., 
Horida State University; J.D., University 
of Connecticut Law School 

A key objective of the master of science in 
criminal justice program is the training and 
education of men and women planning 
careers in the field of criminal justice as well 
as the advanced training and education of 
those who staff the agencies and institutions 
of the criminal justice system. 

The program stresses a broad under- 
standing of the social and behavioral sci- 
ences, the institutions of the criminal justice 
system and the development of method- 
ological tools and skills. 

The courses in the area of social and 
behavioral science stress the theories of the 
behavior of man in a social order and the 
sanctions imposed by different societies to 
control the social behavior of their members. 
Courses in the area of criminal justice insti- 
tutions stress the study of the existing sys- 
tem from the police through the courts, the 
penitentiaries and the system of probation 
and parole. The methodological courses 
expose students to the tools of research and 



Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis in heu 
of CJ 690-1 Research Project and three cred- 
its of elective course work. Registration for a 
minimum of six thesis credits (CJ 697, CJ 
698) would be required. The thesis must 
show ability to organize material in a clear 
and original manner and present well-rea- 
soned conclusions. Thesis preparation and 
submission must comply with the Graduate 
School policy on theses as well as all specific 
department requirements. 

Required Courses* 

CJ 601 /Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 605/Social Deviance 

CJ 610/ Administration of Justice 

CJ 637/Contemporary Issues in Criminal 

Justice 
CJ 651 /Problems in the Administration of 

Justice 
CJ 690-1 /Research Project (3 credits) 
PA 611 /Research Methods in Pubhc 

Administration 
Approved Electives (eight courses) 
Total credits 45 

Ms an alternative to the program listed above a student may 
select one of the folloiving three concentrations. 



52 



Concentrations 

There are three concentrations — correc- 
tional counsehng, criminal justice manage- 
ment and security management — from 
which students may choose more special- 
ized programs. 

Concentration in 
Correctional Counseling 

This program, offered jointly between the 
criminal justice program and the depart- 
ment of psychology, is designed for those 
individuals currently in correctional coun- 
seling positions or those who anticipate a 
career in correctional counseling. 

CJ 601 /Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 610/ Administration of Justice 

CJ 624/Group Process in Criminal Justice 

CJ 690-1 /Research Project (3 credits) 

CJ 693/Criminal Justice Internship I 

P 605/Survey of Community Psychology 

P 611 /Individual Intervention Seminar 

P 628/The Interview 

P 629/Introduction to Psychotherapy and 

Counseling 
Criminal Justice Electives* (three courses) 
Psychology Electives* (three courses) 
Total credits 45 

*Electives will he chosen by consent of adviser. Students may 
be required to take Cj 694 Internship II, depending upon 
experience, ability and hacki;rouud. 

Concentration in Criminal 
Justice Management 

This concentration is designed for those 
individuals wishing to pursue a career in the 
management of a criminal justice agency. 
Courses are offered jointly between the 
criminal justice and the public administra- 
tion programs. 

CJ 601 /Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 
CJ 605/Social Deviance 
CJ 610/ Administration of Justice 
CJ 612/Criminal Justice Management 
CJ 651 /Problems in the Administration of 
Justice 



CJ 690-1 /Research Project (3 credits) 
PA 602 /Public PoUcy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 604 /Communities and Social Change 
PA 611 /Research Methods in PubUc 

Administration 
PA 620/Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
PA 632/Public Finance and Budgeting 
Approved Electives (four courses) 
Total credits 45 

Concentration in 
Security Management 

Concentration Advisor: David Maxwell, 
Professor of Criminal Law and Justice, 
M.A., John Jay College; J.D., University of 
Miami 

This concentration is designed for those 
individuals who are pursuing or wish to 
pursue careers in security management 
within business or industry. Coursework 
stresses broad interaction among the areas 
of security, business administration, fire sci- 
ence and criminal justice. 

CJ 601 /Seminar in Interpersonal Relations 

CJ 605/Social Deviance 

CJ 612/Criminal Justice Management 

CJ 614/Survey of Forensic Science 

CJ 669 /Dynamics, Evaluation and 

Prevention of Structural Fires 
CJ 675/Private Security Law 
CJ 676 /Security Management Seminar 
CJ 677/Private Security in Modern Society 
CJ 690-1 /Research Project (3 credits) 
SFl 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
Approved Electives (three courses) 

Plus two of the following: 

CJ 637/Contemporary Issues in Criminal 

Justice 
EC 625/Industrial Relations 
EC 687/ Collective Bargaining 
PA 625 /Administrative Behavior 
Total credits 45 



Electrical Engineering 

Coordinaton Gerald J. Kirwin, Professor of 
Electrical Engineering, Ph.D., Syracuse 
University 

The master's program in electrical engi- 
neering is intended to meet the needs of 
practicing engineers and scientists for aca- 
demic work beyond the baccalaureate level. 
It has been designed to deepen the under- 
standing of analysis and design techniques 
as they apply to modem engineering sys- 
tems. A major goal of the program is to pro- 
vide discussions of newly emerging 
technologies and design procedures. 

Five required courses, broadly based in 
mathematics and systems concepts, serve as 
a common foundation on which the remain- 
ing components of the program rest. 
Students are encouraged to select their addi- 
tional courses from a series of offerings 
which provides coverage of the major areas 
of current interest to electrical engineers. 
Students are required to identify a particular 
area of concentration and are urged to 
undertake thesis work in that area. Careful 
planning and detailed advising throughout 
each student's period of study serve to 
ensure an integrated educational experience. 

Admission Policy 

This program is open to applicants hold- 
ing a bachelor's degree in electrical engi- 
neering who have compiled a strong 
undergraduate record with a "B" average or 
better. In some instances, students who do 
not meet the above criteria may be consid- 
ered for admission on the basis of evaluation 
of their current status, goals and potential 
for success in the program. Such students 
may be required to undertake additional 
coursework in order to complete the degree 
requirements. Applicants are urged to sub- 
mit Graduate Record Examination (GRE) 
scores to provide additional information for 
the admissions decision. Two letters of rec- 
ommendation from individuals familiar 
with the applicant's potential for graduate 
study are also required. 

A student need not be admitted to the 



Electrical Engineering 53 

program in order to enroll in an individual 
course; however, approval should be 
obtained from the course instructor. Courses 
completed prior to achieving official admis- 
sion to the program may be applied to the 
degree requirements with the approval of 
the program coordinator. 

Transfer Credit 

The transfer of graduate credit from other 
institutions may be permitted with the 
approval of the program coordinator and 
subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this cat- 
alog. 

Thesis/Comprehensive 
Examination 

Students may elect to undertake a thesis 
project for partial fulfillment (six or nine 
credits) of the requirements for the degree. 
The thesis must show abiUty to organize 
materials in a clear and original manner and 
present well-reasoned conclusions. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply 
with the Graduate School policy on theses as 
well as specific department requirements. 
Detailed information concerning these 
requirements is available from the depart- 
ment office. 

Students who do not elect to undertake 
thesis work must pass a comprehensive final 
examination. This examination may be oral, 
written or both and will be based on the pro- 
gram of study that the student has complet- 
ed for the degree. Additional information 
about the comprehensive examination is 
available from the academic adviser. 

M.S.E.E. 

A total of 36 graduate credit hours is 
required for completion of the degree of 
master of science in electrical engineering. 
Candidates for the degree must complete 15 
credit hours of required courses and 21 cred- 
it hours of electives. Students admitted to 
the program are assigned to an academic 
adviser who serves as a mentor to the stu- 
dent, assists in planning the program of 
study and specifies any additional course- 



54 

work that may be needed as preparation for 
graduate study. A detailed schedule of 
courses leading to completion of the degree 
is prepared and approved when the student 
enters the program. This plan of study must 
include an emphasis Ln a major area of the 
discipline; and, if a thesis is elected, the 
work must be in this major area. Subsequent 
changes in the plan of study must be 
approved by the academic adviser. 

Required Courses 

Two mathematics courses* 

Plus the following: 

EE 603 /Discrete and Continuous Systems 1 
EE 604 /Discrete and Continuous Systems II 
EE 650/Random Signal Analysis 
Approved Electives (seven courses) 
Total credits 36 

*Selection of the required mathematics courses must be made 
with the approval of the academic adviser. Students may not 
take M 610, M 615 or M 616 for credit in this degree pro- 
gram. 



Elective Courses 

EE 605/Computer Controlled Systems 
EE 606/Robot Control 

EE 630-1 /Electronics Instrumentation I and II 
EE 634-5 /Digital Signal Processing I and II 
EE 637-8 /Power Systems Engineering I and II 
EE 645 /Introduction to Communication 

Systems 
EE 646-7/DigitaI Communications I and II 
EE 652/Design of Digital Filters 
EE 658 /Microprocessors — Theory and 

Applications 
EE 670 /Selected Topics 
EE 680/Fiber Optic Communications 
EE 681 /Lightwave Technology 
EE 685 /Optimization of Engineering 

Systems 
EE 695/Independent Study 
EE 697-9/Thesis I, II and III 

With the approval of the academic advis- 
er, two of the elective courses may be taken 
in other disciplines of mathematics, engi- 
neering or physics. 



Environmental 
Engineering 

Coordinator: M. Hamdy Bechir, Professor of 
Civil Engineering, Sc.D., Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology 

The environmental engineering program 
is intended to meet the needs of engineers 
for academic work beyond the baccalaureate 
level. The program may be interdisciplinary 
in nature and may incorporate both engi- 
neering and science courses. 

There exists today a need for a substantial 
number of engineers knowledgeable in envi- 
ronmental areas. Industries that are required 
to control the pollution of air and water 
need environmental engineers. Federal, state 
and local governments must hire employees 
and consultants to assist them in environ- 
mental matters. Other new vistas will 
undoubtedly open to the environmental 
engineers in the future. Environmental engi- 
neers will be in increasingly greater demand 
with the increasing problems of pollution. 

This program provides the advanced 
educational skills necessary to meet the 
ever-increasing need for engineers with an 
environmental background. It is designed to 
offer vigorous, professionally oriented engi- 
neering and science courses. 

The program consists of a required 
sequence of eight courses which each stu- 
dent must complete. The balance of the pro- 
gram consists of elective courses selected on 
the basis of the student's principal field of 
interest. Each student, upon entering this 
program, will be assigned a faculty adviser 
who will consult with the student during 
the program of study and will assist the stu- 
dent in selection of suitable electives. The 
faculty adviser will also act as the student's 
research project adviser. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission in the environ- 
mental engineering program are expected to 
have an engineering B.S. degree from a pro- 
gram accredited by the Accreditation Board 
for Engineering and Technology. 



Environmental Science 55 



M.S., Environmental 
Engineering 

A total of 39 credit hours must be com- 
pleted to earn the master of science in envi- 
ronmental engineering degree. The transfer 
of credit from other institutions will be per- 
mitted subject to the Graduate School policy 
on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

Required Courses 

CE 601 /Water Treatment 

CE 602/Wastewater Treatment 

CE 605/Solid Waste Management 

CE 606 /Environmental Law and Legislation 

CE 620/Engineering Hydrology 

CE 623/Open Channel HydrauUcs 

CE 627/ Groundwater Hydrology 

CE 690 /Research Project 

Electives (five courses) 

Total credits 39 

Elective Courses* 

CE 607/Water Pollution Control Processes 
CE 61 2 /Advanced Wastewater Treatment 
CE 61 3 /Industrial Wastewater Control 
CE 614/Surface Water Quahty Management 
CE 616/Groundwater Waste Disposal 
CE 621 /Advanced Hydrology 
CE 624 /Computer Applications in 

Hydrology / Hydraulics 
CE 630 /Reinforced Concrete Design 
CE 631 /Structural Steel Design 
CE 632/Load and Resistance Factor Design 

for Structural Steel 
CE 633 /Wood Engineering 
CE 634/Prestressed Concrete Design 
CE 640/Structural Analysis 
CE 650/Soil Mechanics 1 
CE 651 /Soil Mechanics II 
CE 652 /Foundation Engineering I 
CE 653 /Foundation Engineering II 
CE 660/Project Planning 
CE 670 /Selected Topics 
CE 678/Computer Applications in Civil 

Engineering 
CE 695-6/ Independent Study I and II 
CE 698-9/Thesis 1 and II 
CH 601 /Environmental Chemistry 
EC 608 /Economics for Public 

Adnunistrators 



EN 600/Environmental Geoscience 

EN 601 /Principles of Ecology 

EN 602/Environmental Effects of Pollutants 

'Other courses may be taken as electives tvith the approval of 
the program coordinator. 

Environmental 
Science 

Coordinator: Roman N. Zajac, Assistant 
Professor of Biology and Environmental 
Science, Ph.D., University of Connecticut 

The purpose of this program is to provide 
graduate-level education for careers in envi- 
ronmental science as well as for other areas 
requiring knowledge of environmental prin- 
ciples. It is intended to meet the needs of 
those who wish to enter this dynamic and 
expanding field, those who are active envi- 
ronmental scientists and managers, and also 
those students who plan to pursue graduate 
training beyond the master's level. An inter- 
disciplinary program comprised of courses 
in ecology, geology, chemistry and legisla- 
tion, it provides the advanced skills and 
knowledge necessary to meet the increasing 
demand for scientists with an environmental 
background. Field and laboratory work pro- 
vide practical experience for students 
enrolled in the program, while ongoing fac- 
ulty projects provide opportunities to per- 
form research on various environmental 
problems and issues. 

Scientists knowledgeable in environmen- 
tal issues and science are needed by employ- 
ers in these major areas: 

• government agencies, particularly in the 
areas of environmental protection and 
management; 

• water, sewer and power-generation 
utilities; 

• analytic laboratories; 

• engineering and environmental firms; 

• industries in the field of pollution control; 

• private industry and management. 



56 



Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the environ- 
mental science program are expected to 
have a bachelor's degree in one of the natu- 
ral sciences in which certain prerequisite 
courses have been completed. Students who 
lack these undergraduate courses will be 
required to register for these prerequisite 
courses at the beginning of the course of 
study. 

M.S., Environmental Science 

A total of 39 credit hours must be com- 
pleted to earn the master of science in envi- 
ronmental science degree. The transfer of 
credit earned at other institutions will be 
permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this catalog. 

The program consists of eight required 
courses and five approved elective courses. 
Required courses cover common areas in 
environmental science, while electives 
enable students to form a plan of concentrat- 
ed study in a particular area of interest 
and /or with direct application to their cur- 
rent professional situations. Students may 
elect to write a thesis as part of the program 
of study. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School poli- 
cy on theses as well as all specific depart- 
ment requirements. A thesis is 
recommended for students who wish to 
pursue doctoral training after graduation 
and for those with specific professional 
interests. 

Students should note that some courses 
have prerequisite requirements. The pro- 
gram coordinator should be consulted for 
advice in scheduling of required courses and 
for assistance in selecting approved elec- 
tives. 

Required Courses 

CE 606/Environmental Law and Legislation 

CH 601 /Environmental Chemistry 

EN 600* /Environmental Geoscience 

EN 601*/Principles of Ecology 

EN 602* /Environmental Effects of Pollutants 



EN 607*/ Environmental Reports and Impact 

Assessment 
EN 61 5 /Toxicology 
EN 690*/Research Project 
Electives (Approved) (five courses) 
Total credits 39 

Elective Courses 

CH 602/Environmental Chemical Analysis 

EN 603*/Terrestrial and Wetland Ecology 

EN 604*/Ecology of Inland Waters 

EN 605*/Marine and Estuarine Ecology 

EN 606*/Environmental Data Analysis 

EN 608/Landscape Ecology 

EN 610/Environmental Health 

EN 61 2 /Epidemiology 

EN 6 17* /Subsurface Assessment 

EN 61 8 /Hazardous Materials Management 

EN 670/Selected Topics 

EN 695-6/Independent Study 1 and II 

EN 698-9/Thesis I and II 

Courses in environmental engineering, 
chemistry and computer science are also 
available as electives with the approval of 
the coordinator. A number of Selected 
Topics courses in areas such as environmen- 
tal auditing and bioremediation are also 
offered during each academic year. 

"Some weekend field trips (or acceptable atternatwes) are 
required. 



Executive Master of 

Business 

Administration 

Director: Ruth Gonchar Brennan, Ph.D., 
Temple University 

The Executive Master of Business 
Administration program offered by the 
School of Business is a fully accredited, 
graduate-level degree program designed for 
middle- and upper-level managers who 
have acquired significant managerial experi- 
ence. The Executive M.B.A. degree is con- 



Fire Science 57 



ferred upon completion of a two-year, part- 
time graduate program organized to meet 
the education needs of executives within the 
time constraints and responsibilities 
imposed by their jobs. Individual participa- 
tion is emphasized through class discus- 
sions, interaction and cooperation with 
other executives in the class. 

Executive M.B.A. classes are offered at the 
main campus in West Haven and at other 
locations throughout Connecticut. Each class 
progresses through the program as a group, 
thus providing an opportunity for a two- 
year relationship with other executives for 
the continuing exchange of ideas and infor- 
mation. 

No transfer credit is accepted for admis- 
sion to the Executive M.B.A. program. 
Admission to the Executive M.B.A. program 
is by a special appUcation available from the 
Director. 

Prospective candidates are encouraged to 
apply as early as possible due to enrollment 
limitations. The admission procedure 
includes a screening interview with the 
Director and review of the applicant's cre- 
dentials by the Selection Committee. Each 
candidate is considered on the basis of the 
special application form, official transcripts 
from all undergraduate and graduate 
schools attended, two business-related let- 
ters of recommendation and a letter of orga- 
nizational support. 

The Executive M.B.A. program invites 
both individual and employer-sponsored 
applications. Information and applications 
for the Executive M.B.A. program are avail- 
able from the Office of the Executive M.B.A. 
Director, Room 200, Echlin Hall, (203) 932- 
7386. 

Executive M.B.A. 

The program consists of 20 modules 
scheduled into two, ten-month academic 
calendar years. Each module is four sessions 
in length and has a value of 1 .5 credits. All 
classes meet one afternoon/early evening 
per week in designated conference facilities 
for participants' convenience. Participants 
must agree in advance to attend all classes 



except for emergencies. Students must be 
prepared to devote additional time for class 
preparation and reading assignments. 

Modules 

First Year 

EXID 903/The Communication Process 
EXID 960/Information Management 
EXID 906/The Management Process 
EXID 942/Accounting 
EXID 930/Marketing Practice 
EXID 915/Quantitative Decision Making 
EXID 954/Organizational Development 
EXID 918/Managerial Economics 
EXID 933/Managing the Global 

Marketplace 
EXID 939/Operations Research and 

Management 

Second Year 

EXID 924/Financial Management I 
EXID 927/ Financial Management II 
EXID 945/Human Resources Management 
EXID 948 /Labor and Management Relations 
EXID 909 /Business and Government 

Relations 
EXID 951 /Marketing Management 
EXID 943/Federal Taxation 
EXID 957/Corporate Policy and Strategy 
EXID 999/Special Research Topics 
EXID 921 /Executive Leadership Seminar 
Total credits 30 



Fire Science 



Director: Frederick Mercilliott, Professor of 
Professional Studies; Ph.D., City 
University of New York; D.A., Western 
Colorado University 

Fire science is an interdisciplinary mas- 
ter's program designed to provide advanced 
training for fire service, fire safety, occupa- 
tional safety and security professionals who 
are involved with fire protection. 

Fire protection specialists require knowl- 
edge of the science and methodology for 
preserving lives and property by preventing 
or minimizing losses resulting from fires, 
explosions, accidents and other hazards. 



58 



Current national needs indicate that 
trained fire protection specialists are in 
extremely limited supply. Initial job oppor- 
tunities in the insurance field, industry and 
government service may involve applica- 
tions engineering, research and product 
design, buildings and systems design, haz- 
ard analysis, sales of equipment or insur- 
ance sales. 

The fire science program and courses 
cover a wide range of problems including 
the proper design arrangement and use of 
building materials; analysis of fire and 
explosion hazards; safe design of industrial 
processes; management of industrial loss 
control and insurance programs; and safe 
design, selection and handhng of equipment 
and materials. Training is provided in the 
design of automatic fire extinguishing and 
detection systems and the appUcation of fire 
protection principles to fire department, 
water supply and building code aspects of 
community planning. 

M.S., Fire Science 

Candidates are required to complete 39 
credit hours of graduate work, which may 
include an internship in fire science. 
Transfer credit from other institutions may 
be permitted subject to the Graduate School 
policy on transfer credit detailed elsewhere 
in this catalog. 

Students in the fire science degree pro- 
gram are required to complete the required 
core courses, a concentration in either ad- 
ministration or technology and 12 credits of 
electives. Within the elective portion of the 
program, students must take either FS 690 
Research Seminar and a comprehensive 
examination, or FS 698 and 699 Thesis I and 
Thesis II. 

Students electing to write a thesis must 
register for thesis credit with the depart- 
ment. The thesis must show the ability to 
organize material in a clear and original 
manner and present well-reasoned conclu- 
sions. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with Graduate School policy 
on theses as well as specific department 
requirements. 



Required Courses 

FS 625/Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 
FS 666 /Seminar on Industrial Fire Protection 
FS 667/Fire and Building Codes, Standards 

and Practices 
FS 668 /Fire and Casualty Insurance 

Practices 
FS 669 /Dynamics, Evaluation and 

Prevention of Structural Fires 
Concentration (four courses) 
Electives (four courses) 
Total credits 39 

Concentration in 
Administration 

CS 602/Computing Fundamentals 

MG 637/Management 

PA 602 /Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 620 /Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
Total credits 12 

Concentration in Technology 

FS 661 /Systems Approach to Fire Safety 1 

FS 662/Systems Approach to Fire Safety II 

FS 670 /Selected Topics 

FS 693 /Internship 

Total credits 12 

Elective Courses 

CJ 649 /Fire Scene Investigation and Arson 

Analysis (4 credits) 
CJ 676 /Security Management Seminar 
CJ 677/Private Security in Modern Society 
CO 621 /Managerial Communication 
FS 664 /Terrorism 
FS 665 /Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson 

Investigation 
FS 684/Fire/Accident Scene Reconstruction 
FS 690/ Research Seminar 
FS 698-9 /Thesis I and II 
P 619/Organizational Behavior 
P 670 /Selected Topics 
SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 620/Occupational Safety and Health Law 
SO 610/Urban Sociology 
SO 620/Sociology of Bureauracy 



Forensic Science 59 



In adciition, approved courses from the 
departments of fire science, industrial engi- 
neering, management or political science 
may be taken as electives with the consent 
of the program director. 

See page 86 for the professional certificate 
in fire science. 

Forensic Science 

Director: R. E. Gaensslen, Professor of 
Forensic Science, Ph.D., Cornell 
University 

Forensic science is a broad, interdisci- 
plinary field in which the natural sciences 
are employed to analyze and evaluate phys- 
ical evidence in matters of the law. The 
interdisciplinary forensic science program 
has these concentrations: criminalistics, fire 
science and advanced investigation. In addi- 
tion to the M.S. degree programs, profes- 
sional certificates are offered in all the 
specialties for those who require only the 
specialized courses. The criminalistics pro- 
gram provides the advanced technical back- 
ground for professional laboratory 
examiners and those wishing to enter the 
criminalistics field. 

The fire science program provides ad- 
vanced training in arson scene investigation, 
laboratory analysis of arson-related evi- 
dence and related aspects of arson and fire 
investigation. The advanced investigation 
program provides advanced training in the 
forensic sciences and in investigation tech- 
niques, and is designed for students inter- 
ested in identification, crime-scene, 
investigative and other field work. 

The program and courses stress not only 
up-to-date analytic and scientific methods, 
but also a broad understanding of the con- 
cepts underlying the forensic sciences. 
Degree programs in forensic science require 
a sequence of core courses, followed by con- 
centration requirement courses and a flexi- 
ble offering of electives designed to meet 
individual needs. 

Admission Policy 

For admission to the criminalistics con- 
centration in the M.S. in forensic science 



program, students must have an undergrad- 
uate degree in a natural science field. In 
addition, applicants are required to take the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and 
submit their scores to the Graduate School. 

For admission to the fire science or 
advanced investigation concentrations in the 
M.S. in forensic science program, students 
must have a baccalaureate degree from an 
accredited institution. The degree need not 
be in natural science, and the GRE is not 
required. 

M.S., Forensic Science 

Candidates are required to complete 40 
credit hours of graduate work. Transfer of 
credit from other institutions may be permit- 
ted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this cat- 
alog. At the time of application to the forensic 
science master's program, applicants must speci- 
fy one of the three areas of concentration. 

Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis in Heu 
of CJ 690 Research Project/CJ 693 
Internship and three credits of elective 
coursework. Registration for a minimum of 
six thesis credits (CJ 697, CJ 698) would be 
required. The thesis must show an ability to 
organize material in a clear and original 
manner and present weU-reasoned conclu- 
sions. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School poli- 
cy on theses as well as all specific depart- 
ment requirements. 

Required Courses 

CJ 614/Survey of Forensic Science 

CJ 620/Advanced CriminaHstics I 

CJ 640/Advanced CriminaHstics II 

CJ 653/Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 

CJ 673/ Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science 
CJ 690/Research Project, or CJ 693/Criminal 

Justice Internship 
Concentration (seven courses, 22 credits) 
Total credits 40 



60 



Elective Courses 

CJ 608/Law and Evidence 

CJ 610/ Administration of Justice 

CJ 670 /Selected Topics 

CJ 675 /Private Security Law 

CJ 676/Security Management Seminar 

CJ 677/Private Security in Modern Society 

CJ 695/Independent Study 

SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 620/Occupational Safety and Health Law 
SH 630/Product Safety and Liability 

In addition, other concentration courses 
(in lists from which one, two or more must 
be taken) may be taken as electives. Courses 
listed as requirements for one of the concen- 
trations may be taken as electives for other 
concentrations with the permission of the 
director of the program. 

Concentration in Advanced 
Investigation 

CJ 616/Advanced Crime Scene Investigation 
CJ 632/Advanced Investigation I 
CJ 633/Advanced Investigation II 
Electives (three courses, 10 credits) 

Plus one of the following: 

CJ 608/Law and Evidence 

PS 605/Criminal Law 

Total credits 22 

Concentration in 
Criminalistics 

CJ 621 /Advanced Criminalistics I 

Laboratory (1 credit) 
CJ 641 /Advanced Criminalistics II 

Laboratory (1 credit) 
CJ 654/ Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 

Laboratory (1 credit) 
CJ 674/ Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science Laboratory (1 credit) 
Electives (three courses, 10-12 credits) 



Plus two of the following: 

CH 621 /Chemical Forensic Analysis with 

Laboratory (4 credits) 
CH 631 /Advances in Analytic Chemistry 
CJ 660/Forensic Microscopy (4 credits) 
CJ 661 /Medicolegal Investigation and 

Identification 
CJ 662/Forensic Toxicology (4 credits) 
CJ 663/Advanced Forensic Serology I (4 

credits) 
CJ 664/Advanced Forensic Serology II (4 

credits) 
Total credits 22 

Concentration in Fire Science 

CH 625/Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 
CJ 649/Fire Scene Investigation and Arson 

Analysis (4 credits) 
CJ 608/Law and Evidence, or FS 665/Legal 

Aspects of Fire and Arson Investigation 

or PS 605/Criminal Law 
Electives (three courses, 9 credits) 

Plus one of the following: 

CJ 667/ Fire and Building Codes, Standards, 

and Practices 
CJ 668/Fire and Casualty Insurance 

Practices 
CJ 669/Dynamics, Evaluation and 

Prevention of Structural Fires 
CJ 684 /Fire/ Accident Scene Reconstruction 
Total credits 22 

See pages 86-87 for professional certifi- 
cates in forensic science. 



Hotel and Restaurant 
Management (M.B.A.) 

Concentration Adviser: James F. Downey, 
Professor of Hotel and Restaurant 
Management, Ph.D., Purdue University 

The hotel and restaurant management 
program, a concentration in the master of 
business administration degree, prepares 
men and women for professional careers in 
the hospitality industry. 



Today's college graduates will find the 
career paths leading to top management 
positions in the hotel and restaurant indus- 
try to be different from and more difficult 
than those of the recent past. Considerable 
hands-on experience together with an 
M.B.A. will be necessary for those intent on 
becoming tomorrow's chief hospitality exec- 
utives and corporate officers. 

This program's objectives are to: 

• develop analytic sldUs necessary for the 
competent and profitable operation of a 
hospitality facility at the unit or corporate 
level; 

• underscore the importance of those finan- 
cial, economic, marketing and statistical 
factors which contribute to the success of 
a hospitality operation; and 

• prepare the M.B.A. candidate for a career 
in hotel and restaurant education. 

Career Opportunities 

Careers in hotel and restaurant manage- 
ment offer outstanding personal and finan- 
cial rewards. Graduates of the M.B.A. 
program face a variety of career possibilities 
in the United States and abroad, from man- 
aging restaurants and food service opera- 
tions to managing large hotels, private 
clubs, resorts and housing complexes. 

The M.B.A. graduate may seek a chal- 
lenging and diversified career in operations, 
accounting, finance or marketing within a 
hospitahty corporation. The food and bever- 
age industry is another alternative for the 
M.B.A. graduate aspiring to attain an execu- 
tive or corporate position. The hotel and 
restaurant management program does not 
limit the graduate to hospitality fields; stu- 
dents are prepared to enter any field for 
which an M.B.A. degree is suitable. 

Industry Experience 

Because of the unique nature of the hotel 
and restaurant industry, students may be 
required to complete a 500-hour practicum, 
evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending 
on the student's experience working in this 
career area. 



Hotel and Restaurant Management 61 

Concentration Courses 

A student is required to complete a total 
of 48 credit hours, with or without thesis. A 
master's thesis is recommended but not 
required. Candidates for the M.B.A. /Hotel 
and Restaurant Management degree electing 
to write a thesis must register for Thesis I 
and II in the Hotel and Restaurant 
Management Department and would substi- 
tute these six credits of HR 698-699 for MG 
690 and one elective course in the program. 

The concentration adviser may approve 
substitutions based on the student's previ- 
ous coursework, background in the industry 
and/or work experience in the industry. 

Students with no previous academic back- 
ground in the hotel and restaurant industry 
are required to take HR 600 Hotel and 
Restaurant Industry. This non-credit course 
is an overview of the industry. 

In addition to the previously stated 
M.B.A. required courses (see page 37), the 
hotel and restaurant management concen- 
tration consists of: 

HR 605/ Hospitahty Corporate Law, or 
HR 635 /Hospitality Industry Capital 
Budgeting and Managerial Accounting 

HR 650 /Hospitality Corporate Marketing 

HR 655 /Development of Hotel and 
Restaurant Operations 

HR 670/Selected Topics, or 

HR/630 Personnel and Labor Relations in 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Operations 

Total credits 12 



Industrial Engineering 

Coordinator: Ira H. Kleinfeld, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Eng.Sc.D., 
Columbia University 

This program is intended to meet the 
needs of professionally employed engineers 
working in an environment where cost effec- 
tiveness, high productivity and effective use 
of resources is crucial. It has been designed 
to give the student an advanced level of 
training beyond the baccalaureate, sufficient 
to prepare for a leadership role in industry. 



62 



insofar as the practice of industrial engineer- 
ing is concerned. 

The program centers on a core sequence 
required of all students. It contains courses 
in analysis and design considered to be of 
common interest to all industrial engineers 
of advanced professional standing. (See the 
notes which follow regarding waivers relat- 
ed to these core courses.) Students complete 
the program by choosing elective courses in 
operations research, human factors, manu- 
facturing engineering, computer science or 
others that are particularly suited to their 
professional interests. Electives should be 
chosen so as to provide a coherent selection 
meeting the student's needs. Once the stu- 
dent and the student's adviser have agreed 
on these electives, they shall become part of 
the student's program of study. All subse- 
quent changes in electives must be made 
with the adviser's advance written consent. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the program 
are expected to hold an undergraduate 
degree in engineering from a program 
accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology (ABET). In 
some cases, an applicant with a degree in a 
related field may be considered for admis- 
sion. Applicants with degrees in fields other 
than industrial engineering will be required 
to take a number of undergraduate courses 
or otherwise demonstrate proficiency in sev- 
eral areas normally included in an under- 
graduate industrial engineering program. 

Though admission decisions are based 
primarily on an applicant's undergraduate 
record, the promise of academic success is 
the essential factor for admission. 

Due to the sequencing of courses in this 
program, full-time students applying to the 
master's program in industrial engineering 
usually will be accepted for the fall term 
only. Acceptance for full-time study to begin 
in the winter or spring terms will be made 
only in rare circumstances on a case-by-case 
basis. 



M.S.I.E. 

The program consists of 48 credit hours. 
The transfer of credit from other institutions 
will be permitted subject to the Graduate 
School policy on transfer credit detailed 
elsewhere in this catalog. Required courses 
may be waived on the basis of undergradu- 
ate courses taken at accredited institutions. 
All waivers must be approved in writing by 
the department of industrial engineering 
and are conditional upon subsequent aca- 
demic performance. In some cases, the pro- 
gram coordinator may permit substitution 
of relevant courses in place of the required 
courses. 

Research Project/Thesis Requirement 

All students in the program will complete 
a thesis or an appropriate special project 
which will partially fulfill the elective 
requirements for the degree. The special 
project requirement will usually be satisfied 
by taking a research project course in a 
group setting. A designated area of study 
may be indicated for each such research pro- 
ject course; in these cases, the instructor will 
offer direction in the area and will assist stu- 
dents in the development of substantial 
individual projects. Particular requirements 
or prerequisites may be set for the course or 
for those individuals intending to complete 
a project. In appropriate cases having special 
approval, a student may elect to write a the- 
sis or take a research project course (as listed 
in the catalog) on an individual basis. 

Required Courses 

CS606/FORTRAN Programming 
IE 601 /Introduction to Operations 
Research /Management Science 
IE 607/ Probability Theory 
IE 609 /Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 
IE 623/Decision Analysis 
IE 624/Quahty Analysis 
IE 651 /Human Engineering I 
IE 655/lVlanufacturing Analysis 
IE 681 /System Simulation 
IE 686/Inventory Analysis 
IE 688/Design of Experiments 
Approved Electives (five courses) 
Total credits 48 



Industrial/Organiza- 
tional Psychology 

Coordinator: Robert D. Dugan, Professor of 
Psychology, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

The field of industrial and organizational 
psychology is directed toward the solution 
of a wide variety of human problems in 
organizational settings. This apphed behav- 
ioral science and profession serves organiza- 
tions and their employees in a number of 
areas, including: 

selection and placement of employees 
human resources management 
application of psychological tests and 
assessment techniques 
employee performance review 
employee training 
management development 
employee motivation and productivity 
organizational chmate 
employee attitude and morale measure- 
ment 

organizational change and development 
human resources and personnel policy 
planning 

job analysis and evaluation 
job design and enrichment 
employee assistance programming 
stress management 

The goal of the graduate program in 
industrial /organizational psychology is to 
develop expertise in applying the principles 
and practice of the science of psychology to 
improve the effectiveness and satisfaction of 
people at work. The program offers an edu- 
cational experience that has a built-in flexi- 
bility to accommodate students with many 
different career interests. It also provides 
students with knowledge of contemporary 
theory, research and practice in the areas 
listed above. 

Admission Policy 

Applicants are expected to possess social 
and interpersonal characteristics that will 
support success in organizational settings. 



Industrial/Organizational Psychology 63 

Students who give evidence of a mature 
interest in the application of psychological 
principles to organizational problems and 
who hold an undergraduate degree from an 
accredited college or university are eligible 
for admission. 

Apphcants are expected to take the 
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) and 
submit their scores to the Graduate School. 
Apphcants will be asked to complete a ques- 
tionnaire and submit it directly to the 
Graduate School. 

An undergraduate major in psychology is 
not specifically required as a basis for con- 
sideration. However, all students are expect- 
ed to have at least an introductory-level 
understanding of psychological concepts, 
principles and methods before taking cours- 
es in the master of arts in industrial /organi- 
zational psychology program. Mastery of 
the content of an undergraduate statistics 
course, or equivalent, is prerequisite to two 
of the eight core courses. 

M.Av Industrial/Organizational 
Psychology 

A total of 48 credit hours is required of 
candidates for the degree of master of arts in 
industrial/organizational psychology. 
Candidates for this degree are required to 
complete 24 credit hours of required courses 
in the core curriculum. Another 24 credit 
hours (including concentrations, program 
options and electives) are chosen after con- 
sultation with the program coordinator, or 
an I/O faculty member, in light of the stu- 
dent's academic and professional goals. 
Students may not complete more than nine 
credit hours of electives until they have sat- 
isfied the core requirements. Up to nine 
credit hours of electives may be taken in 
other departments, such as industrial engi- 
neering, economics, management, market- 
ing or pubhc management. 

Transfer Credit 

The transfer of credit from other institu- 
tions will be permitted subject to the 
Graduate School policy on transfer of credit 
detailed elsewhere in this catalog. 



64 



Thesis 

Students may elect to write a thesis as 
part of the program of study. The thesis 
must show abihty to organize materials in a 
clear and original manner and present well- 
reasoned conclusions. Thesis preparation 
and submission must comply with the 
Graduate School policy on theses as well as 
all specific department requirements. 

Program Options 

Students have the opportunity to develop 
a program that meets their particular needs 
and interests by choosing from many elec- 
tive courses and various program options. 
These options include a thesis, for those stu- 
dents interested in future pursuit of a doc- 
toral degree; an internship, for those students 
interested in a realistic introduction to an 
organizational environment; or a practicum, 
for those students who are already 
employed. 

Option 1 (Thesis) is intended primarily for 
those students who are interested in contin- 
uing their education in doctoral-level pro- 
grams. This option gives students the 
research experience necessary to be success- 
ful in pursuit of admission to and comple- 
tion of a Ph.D. program. 

Option 2 (Intemship/Practicum) allows the 
student to acquire special skills through 
coordinating formal coursework with an 
internship or practicum in an organizational 
setting. The internship gives the student 
with limited work experience the opportu- 
nity to work in one of several cooperating 
business, social service, health, educational 
or governmental organizations. The 
practicum experience is for the student who 
is currently employed. The area of study 
will ordinarily be outside of the student's 
regular job assignment. 

The content of the practicum or intern- 
ship will be established jointly by the coop- 
erating organization, the faculty adviser and 
the student. A comprehensive project report 
is required in which the student will analyze 
and integrate internship/ practicum experi- 
ences with relevant research and course- 



work, emphasizing the content of the eight 
core courses. 

Option 3 (Approved Electives) consists of 
elective courses selected under faculty 
advisement. The choice of electives is 
intended to provide the student with a 
broad interdisciplinary background, com- 
plementing the student's owti academic 
training and interest. A comprehensive 
examination covering material from the 
required core psychology courses is required 
under this option. 

Program Concentrations 

Within each of the program options 
described above, it is possible for students to 
concentrate in either the industrial-person- 
nel area or the organizational area of I/O 
psychology. A concentration requires 12 
credit hours of specific elective courses, 
which would be counted as part of the 24 
credits required in the elective option 
(Thesis, Intemship/Practicum or Approved 
Electives) selected by the student for com- 
pletion of the program. If a concentration is 
selected, the student must notify the pro- 
gram coordinator as well as the Graduate 
Records Office. A concentration is not 
required if the student's educational or 
career goals can best be met without this 
specialization. 

Required Courses 

EC 625/Industrial Relations 

P 608/Psychometrics and Statistics* 

P 609 /Research Methods* 

P 619/Organizational Behavior 

P 620 /Industrial Psychology 

P 635 /Assessment of Human Performance 

with Standardized Tests 
P 640/Industrial Motivation and Morale 
P 645/Seminar in Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology 
Program option** (eight courses) 
Total credits 48 

Program Options 

Option 1 (Thesis) 

P 698-9 /Thesis I and II 
Electives** (six courses) 



Industrial Relations 65 



Option 2 (Intemship/Practicum) 

P 693-4 /Organizational Internship I and II, or 

P 678-9/Practicum I and II 
Electives** (six courses) 

Option 3 (Approved Electives) 

Comprehensive examination required 
Electives** (eight courses) 

"Undergraduate preparation in statistics is prerequisite. 
"The choice of electives is made in consultation with a 
departmental adviser in light of the student's academic and 
professional goals. 

Concentration in Industrial- 
Personnel Psychology 

Students who select this concentration 
wUl count these course credits toward the 
elective courses required in one of the pro- 
gram options listed above. 

P 610/Program Evaluation 

P 644 /Performance Measurement 

Plus two of the following: 

MG 645 /Management of Human Resources 
P 628/The Interview 

P 641 /Personnel Development and Training 
Total credits 12 

Concentration in 
Organizational Psychology 

Students who select this concentration 
will count these course credits toward the 
elective courses required in one of the pro- 
gram options Usted previously. 

P 642/Organizational Change and 

Development 
P 643 /The Psychology of Conflict 

Management 

Plus two of the following: 

P 612/Consultation Seminar 
P 623 /Psychology of the Small Group 
P 624 /Experiential Self- Analytic Group 
P 638/ Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 
Total credits 12 



See page 79 for the senior professional certi- 
ficate in applications of psychology. 

Industrial Relations 

Coordinator Wilfred Harricharan, Professor 
of Management, Ph.D., Cornell University 

Environmental forces over the past 
decades have created a demand for greater 
sophistication and professionalism from 
those responsible for personnel functions 
within all organizations whether public or 
private, profit or nonprofit, unionized or 
not. More and more companies and institu- 
tions are requiring the services of people 
conversant with both the large body of 
available tools and the constraints that have 
evolved during this period. The program 
leading to the master of science degree in 
industrial relations represents a flexible 
response to this demand. 

Industrial relations, as a management and 
behavioral science discipline, is concerned 
with all aspects of the employment relation- 
ship and, in particular, with the organiza- 
tion's maintenance of the human resources 
necessary to achieve organizational objec- 
tives. As an academic discipline and profes- 
sion, industrial relations is an 
interdisciplinary, problem-solving field that 
attempts to maintain harmony and resolve 
conflicts among the four major parties to the 
employment relationship — employees, 
employers, government and, where applica- 
ble, unions. 

The M.S. in industrial relations program 
is aimed at people presently employed in or 
aspiring to positions in various kinds of 
organizations in the fields of employment, 
training and development, wage and salary 
administrafion, employee services and bene- 
fits, labor-management relafions, job and 
organizational design, labor economics and 
manpower planning. 

Because of the diversity of student inter- 
ests and employment demand, the program 
is flexible. The required courses in the pro- 
gram are drawn from the disciplines of eco- 
nomics, management and psychology. There 
is a great deal of flexibility in choice of elec- 



66 



tive courses. As a result, students will find it 
possible to tailor the curriculum to their spe- 
cific needs and interests. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission are required to 
hold a baccalaureate degree from an accred- 
ited institution of higher education. While 
not an absolute necessity, the undergraduate 
degree should preferably be in business 
administration, public administration or in a 
social or behavioral science (e.g., economics, 
history, poUtical science, psychology or soci- 
ology). Application for admission is also 
open to full-time employed professionals in 
personnel and industrial relations holding a 
baccalaureate degree in any field from an 
accredited institution. 

Though admissions decisions are usually 
based on an apphcant's undergraduate 
record, in some cases the applicant may be 
required to submit scores from the Graduate 
Management Admission Test (GMAT). 

M.S., Industrial Relations 

A total of 39 graduate credit hours is 
required for completion of the master of sci- 
ence degree in industrial relations. Of these, 
12 credit hours are in approved elective 
courses. A list of approved elective courses 
appears below. 

Students may elect to write a thesis in lieu 
of MG 690 Research Project and one elective 
course. The thesis must show ability to orga- 
nize material in a clear and original manner 
and must present well-reasoned conclu- 
sions. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School poli- 
cy on theses as well as all specific depart- 
ment requirements. 

Required Courses 

EC 625/lndustrial Relations 

EC 627/Economics of Labor Relations 

EC 687 /Collective Bargaining 

MG 637/Management 

MG 645 /Management of Human Resources 

MG 678 /Personnel Management Seminar 

MG 679 /Industrial Relations Seminar 

MG 690/Research Project 



P 619/Organizational Behavior 

Approved Electives (four courses) 

Total credits 39 

Elective Courses 

(Other courses may quaUfy subject to 
approval of the coordinator.) 

A 609/State and Local Taxation 
CO 621 /Managerial Communication 
EC 629 /Public Policies Toward Business 
HR 630 /Personnel and Labor Relations in 

Hotel and Restaurant Operations 
IE 604/Management Systems 
MG 640/Management of Health Care 

Organizations (in lieu of MG 637) 
MG 661 /Development of Management 

Thought 
MG 662/Organization Theory 
MG 663 /Leadership in Organizations 
MG 664/Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 665/Compensation Administration 
MG 680 /Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
P 620 /Industrial Psychology 
P 628/The Interview 
P 635/Assessment of Human Performance 

with Standardized Tests 
P 640/Industrial Motivation and Morale 
P 641 /Personnel Development and Training 
PA 620 /Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
PA 650/Administrative Law 
QA 604 /Probability and Statistics 
SH 608/Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SO 601 /Minority Group Relations 

Management Systems 
(ScD.) 

Directon Rolf K. Tedefalk, Professor of 
Finance, Ph.D., University of Minnesota 

The doctor of science in management sys- 
tems is a terminal, applied research-oriented 
degree in the broad and rapidly evolving 
subfield of management systems. It is 
designed for two audiences: private and 
public sector employees in senior staff, man- 



agement and executive positions; and indi- 
viduals planning academic careers in man- 
agement. Students may be accepted for both 
part-time and full-time study. 

The Sc.D. program is accredited by the 
Board of Governors for Higher Education of 
the State of Connecticut and by the New 
England Association of Schools and 
Colleges. 

Admission Policy 

All decisions on admission to the UNH 
doctor of science program are made on an 
individual basis by a Doctoral Admissions 
Committee. All applicants must: 

• submit the special doctoral program 
appUcation for admission form along 
with a written Statement of Purpose doc- 
ument; 

• provide official transcripts showing evi- 
dence of an earned baccalaureate degree 
and work to date or completion of an 
earned master's degree from an accredit- 
ed institution; 

• take the GMAT and /or have official, cur- 
rent or recent (within five years) test 
scores for the GMAT reported to the uni- 
versity; and 

• submit three letters of recommendation 
for the Sc.D. program. 

Application to the doctoral program requires 
special forms which are available from the 
Graduate School Admissions Office. 

AppUcants providing evidence of an 
earned M.B.A. from an accredited college or 
university with superior performance in the 
master's program will be considered for 
admission when they have met the above 
requirements for all applicants. 

Applicants providing evidence of superi- 
or performance in an earned master's 
degree other than an M.B.A. from an accred- 
ited college or university will be required to 
pass written master's level qualifying exam- 
inations in accounting, economics, finance, 
management, marketing, management 
information systems and statistics or will be 
required to complete the appropriate gradu- 
ate-level course(s) with a grade of "B" or 
better prior to fully matriculated enrollment 



Management Systems/Sc.D. 67 

in the doctoral-level courses, provided that 
they have met all other admission criteria. 
All prerequisites must be completed before 
enrollment in doctoral- level courses. The 
Doctoral Admissions Committee and/or 
faculty teaching doctoral-level courses may 
require successful completion of special 
examinations designed to assess current 
competencies in specific areas. 

To provide for the special needs of work- 
ing people, the UNH doctoral program 
offers the opportunity for part-time as well 
as full-time study. Full-time doctoral study 
at UNH consists of registration for a mini- 
mum of four and a maximum of six doctoral 
courses per academic year of three 
trimesters. Full-time doctoral study for 
international students who are required to 
maintain full-time enrollment for their 
immigration status is defined as two doctor- 
al courses per trimester for a total of six doc- 
toral courses per academic year. Such 
persons will continue to be considered full- 
time students as long as their dissertation 
adviser, department chair and /or director of 
the doctoral program certify that the student 
is making satisfactory progress toward com- 
pletion of the doctoral degree. Full-time stu- 
dents are expected to spend three years in 
the program. 

Part-time doctoral study will consist of 
registration for at least two doctoral courses 
per academic year Part-time students nor- 
mally require five to six years to complete 
the program. 

Sc.D., Management Systems 

The three segments of the doctoral pro- 
gram are: ten 700-level core courses, written 
and oral comprehensive examinations, and 
the completion and successful defense of a 
dissertation representing the results of origi- 
nal research performed under the supervi- 
sion of a faculty adviser and a dissertation 
committee. 

Core Program 

The core courses, identified by 700-level 
prefixes, are restricted to doctoral students. 
The uniform core is required of all students 
in the program and leads to the doctoral 



68 

comprehensive examinations which will 
qualify the student for candidacy. All core 
courses must be taken in residence at the 
university. Course descriptions for the core 
courses are on pages 137-138 of this catalog. 

EC 703 /Forecasting and Econometrics 

EC 704/Public and Private Policy Interfaces 

FI 701 /Seminar in Financial Policy 

IE 704/Seminar in Management and Control 

Systems 
MG 701 /Research Design I 
MG 702/Research Design II 
MG 737/Seminar in Management 
MG 738 /Policy and Strategic Decision 

Making 
MK 701 /Seminar in Strategic Marketing 
P 719/Seminar in Human Resources 
Total core credits 30 

Doctoral students are expected to com- 
plete the doctoral core courses according to 
a sequencing approved by the Doctoral 
Committee. Exceptions to this poHcy must 
be approved by the director of the doctoral 
program. (The annual sequencing of courses 
may be changed within a given year:) 

Suggested Part-Time Sequence 
Yearl MG 701 MG 702 EC 703 
Year 2 IE 704 H 701 MK701 

Years P 719 MG 737 MG 738 
Year 4 EC 704 

Suggested Full-Time Sequence 
Yearl MG 701 MG 702 EC 703 

IE 704 FI 701 MK 701 

Year 2 P719 MG 737 MG 738 

EC 704 

Throughout the program, any student 
with a QPR of less than 3.00 will be placed 
on probation. A student with a QPR of less 
than 3.00 upon completion of four or more 
courses is subject to dismissal from the pro- 
gram. Repetition of doctoral coursework is 
limited to no more than one repetition of 
any one course, up to a maximum of two 
courses. 



Comprehensive Examinations 

The written comprehensive examinations 
consist of three parts: 

Statistics and Research Methodology: 

Four-hour examination; content defined by 
knowledge domains covered in MG 701, 
MG 702 and EC 703. 

Foundation Knowledge: Three-hour 
examination; content defined by knowledge 
domains covered in IE 704, ¥1 701, and MK 
701. 

Management Systems: Five-hour exami- 
nation; content defined by knowledge 
domains covered in P 719, MG 737, MG 738 
and EC 704. 

Students may sit for the Statistics and 
Research Methodology examination upon 
successful completion of MG 701, MG 702 
and EC 703 and may sit for the Foundation 
Knowledge examination upon successful 
completion of IE 704, H 701 and MK 701. In 
order to qualify for admission to the 
Management Systems comprehensive exam- 
ination, doctoral students must have com- 
pleted all of the doctoral core courses with a 
QPR of at least 3.30. 

The doctoral comprehensive examina- 
tions will consist of both a written and an 
oral component. A three-hour oral examina- 
tion will be scheduled after successful com- 
pletion of all written examinations. Doctoral 
students must maintain continuing registra- 
tion during each trimester. 

Dissertation 

A dissertation is required of all candi- 
dates for the Sc.D. degree. After passing the 
comprehensive examinations, a candidate 
will participate in the selection of a disserta- 
tion advisory committee. This dissertation 
committee will be composed of three 
University of New Haven Kill-time faculty 
members and may include at most two per- 
sons from outside the university who will 
act as dissertation readers. The outside per- 
sons shall hold earned doctorates and shall 



have expertise in the area of the dissertation 
focus. Doctoral dissertations must be based 
on original research. Candidates are encour- 
aged to select dissertation topics that are ori- 
ented toward apphed management 
problems. The dissertation will contain the 
research problem and background, the 
research methods and approaches used, and 
the results and discussion of the results. The 
exact definition of the research problems 
and the research methods will be formulated 
by the candidate in consultation with the 
dissertation adviser and with the approval 
of the dissertation committee. 

Candidates must register for a three-cred- 
it dissertation course (MG 801, MG 802, MG 
803 and MG 804) in each of the four consec- 
utive trimesters following the formal cre- 
ation of a dissertation committee. After 
completion of the last of the 10 doctoral core 
courses, students must maintain continuing 
registration in each trimester that they are 
not registered for dissertation credits. 

Following successful completion of the 
doctoral v^itten and oral examinations, stu- 
dents will be notified in writing of their ele- 
vation to candidacy for the doctoral degree. 
Students will then be required to file the 
appropriate forms approving the members 
of the student's dissertation committee and 
the student's dissertation proposal. These 
forms are available from the director of the 
doctoral program or from the Graduate 
School. 

All coursework for the Sc.D. program 
must be completed within five years of com- 
pletion of the first 700-level course. The dis- 
sertation must be completed and 
successfully defended within eight years of 
completion of the first 700-level course. 

Additional information regarding the 
requirements for the Sc.D. program in man- 
agement systems is available from the 
Graduate School or from the director of the 
doctoral program. 



Mechanical Engineering 69 

Mechanical 
Engineering 

Coordinator: Konstantine C. Lambrakis, 
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, 
Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

This program is intended to meet the 
needs of professionally employed engineers 
and scientists for academic work beyond the 
baccalaureate level. Its purpose is to increase 
competence in modem analysis and synthe- 
sis techniques as they apply to engineering 
design. 

The program centers on a core sequence 
which all students are expected to take. The 
core courses contain advanced methods of 
analysis and design which are of common 
interest in engineering work. Students com- 
plete the program by electing a series of 
courses in mechanical engineering particu- 
larly suited to their current professional 
interests. Early in the program, students, 
with the approval of the adviser, prepare a 
detailed plan ensuring an overall education- 
al experience that is integrated and logical. 

All decisions regarding both core and 
elective requirements are subject to final 
approval by the student's adviser. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the master's 
program in mechanical engineering are nor- 
mally expected to have a grade average of 
"B" or better in their undergraduate course- 
work and to hold a bachelor's degree in 
mechanical engineering from a program 
accredited by the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology. In some cases, 
appUcants with a bachelor's degree in a field 
closely related to mechanical engineering 
may be considered for admission. Scores 
from the Graduate Record Examination 
(GRE), though not required, may be submit- 
ted in support of an application for admis- 
sion. Two letters of recommendation from 
individuals familiar with the applicant's 
potential for graduate study are also 
required. Students accepted on a provisional 
basis may be required to complete certain 



70 



additional undergraduate mechanical engi- 
neering courses prior to enrolling in the 
graduate courses in the program. 

M.S.M.E. 

A minimum of 36 credits must be com- 
pleted to earn the master of science degree 
in mechanical engineering. Transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted 
subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit. A thesis is optional but high- 
ly recommended for students wishing to 
study in depth particular areas of interest 
under the guidance of a faculty member. 
Thesis topics should be approved by the fac- 
ulty adviser when the student has complet- 
ed 18-21 graduate credits. Students should 
contact the coordinator for thesis advisers in 
these speciahzed areas: acoustics /aerody- 
namics, fluids/biomechanics, gas dynamics, 
heat transfer/thermodynamics, applied 
mechanics /optics, systems analysis/ 
machine design, materials/metallurgy, ran- 
dom vibrations/numerical analysis, solid 
mechanics/computer-aided design. Thesis 
preparation and submission must comply 
with the Graduate School pohcy on theses as 
well as with all specific department require- 
ments. 

If a thesis is not chosen, and unless a 
major special project approved by the grad- 
uate program coordinator is completed 
within the scope of other mechanical engi- 
neering courses, a student will be required 
to undertake a three- or six-credit project, on 
an independent study basis, supervised by a 
full-time faculty member in the department 
of mechanical engineering. 

Required Courses 

ME 602/Mechanical Engineering Analysis 
ME 604/Numerical Techniques in 

Mechanical Engineering 
ME 610/Advanced Dynamics 
ME 615/Theory of Elasticity 
ME 620/Classical Thermodynamics 
ME 630/Advanced Fluid Mechanics 
Electives (six courses) 
Total credits 36 



Elective Courses* 

M 624/Applied Mathematics 

ME 605/Finite Element Methods in 

Engineering 
ME 611 /System Vibrations 
ME 612/Random Vibrations 
ME 613/Fundamentals of Acoustics 
ME 625 /Mechanics of Continua 
ME 632/Advanced Heat Transfer 
ME 635/Dynamic Systems and Control 
ME 638 /Measurement and Instrumentation 

in Mechanical Engineering 
ME 645/Computational Fluid Dynamics 

and Heat Transfer 
ME 670/Selected Topics 
ME 695-6 /Independent Study I and II 
ME 698-9/Thesis I and II 

"With the coordinator's approval, two of the elective courses 
may be taken in departments other than mechanical engineer- 
ing. 

Occupational 
Safety and Health 
Management 

Coordinator: Brad T. Garber, Professor of 
Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

The M.S. program is designed to develop 
the skills required to manage a comprehen- 
sive safety and health program. It will 
accommodate both active practitioners and 
persons who wish to enter this dynamic 
field. An in-depth education is provided 
through a program of 30 credit hours of 
required courses and 18 credit hours of elec- 
tives. The courses provide training in both 
the technical and management areas. 

Specifically, the graduates of the program 
will have received extensive instruction in 
how to: 

• evaluate the quality and effectiveness of 
existing safety programs; 

• conduct surveys for health and safety 
hazards; 

• institute programs to improve safety and 



health performance; 

• estabhsh accident prevention procedures; 

• implement control measures to eliminate 
or reduce hazards; 

• recommend methods of compliance with 
local, state and federal regulations and 
with voluntary standards, and 

• manage occupational safety and health 
programs in industry, government and 
labor unions. 

Admission Policy 

Candidates for admission to the master of 
science in occupational safety and health 
management program are required to hold a 
baccalaureate degree from an accredited 
institution. Undergraduate courses in gener- 
al chemistry, general physics and biology are 
required. Students who do not meet all 
requirements will be evaluated on an indi- 
vidual basis. 



M.S., Occupational Safety and 
Health Management 

Candidates are required to complete 48 
credit hours of graduate work. Transfer of 
credit from other institutions will be permit- 
ted subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit noted elsewhere in this cata- 
log. Consideration for waiver of core courses 
on the basis of undergraduate experience is 
at the discretion of the program coordinator. 

The student will choose 12 credit hours of 
electives in consultation with the adviser. 
Students also must take six credit hours of 
SH 693/694 Internship, SH 690/691 
Research Project, or SH 698/699 Thesis. 

Students electing to write a thesis must 
register for thesis credit with the depart- 
ment. The thesis must show the ability to 
organize material in a clear and original 
manner and present well-reasoned conclu- 
sions. Thesis preparation and submission 
must comply with the Graduate School poli- 
cy on theses as well as specific department 
requirements. 



O.S.H. Management 71 

Required Courses 

IE 651 /Human Engineering 1 
MG 637/ Management 
P 619/Organizational Behavior 
QA 604/Probability and Statistics 
SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 605/Industrial Safety Engineering 
SH 608/lndustrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 61 5 /Toxicology 
SH 620/Occupational Safety and Health 

Law 
SH 630/Product Safety and Liability 
Electives (six courses) 
Total credits 48 

Elective Courses* 

CE 602/Wastewater Treatment 

CE 607/ Water Pollution Control Processes 

CH 601 /Environmental Chemistry 

EN 602 /Environmental Effects of Pollutants 

EN 610/Environmental Health 

EN 612/Epidemiology 

FS 666/Seminar on Industrial Fire Protection 

IE 612/Managerial Interactions I 

MG 664/Organizational Effectiveness 

MG 678 /Personnel Management Seminar 

P 640 /Industrial Motivation and Morale 

SH 611 /OSH Research Methods and 

Techniques 
SH 660/Industrial Ventilation 
SH 661 /Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 665 /Occupational Safety and Health 

Measurements 
SH 670/Selected Topics 
SH 690-1 /Research Project I and 11 
SH 693-4/OSH Internship 1 and II 
SH 695-6/Independent Study I and II 
SH 698-9/Thesis I and II 

*Other courses may be substituted with the consent of the 
program coordinator. 



72 



Concentration in Industrial 
Hygiene 

Within the master of science program in 
occupational safety and health management, 
students may use their electives to fulfill the 
requirements for a concentration in industri- 
al hygiene. The coursework is designed to 
meet the needs of both practicing industrial 
hygienists and those aspiring to enter this 
profession. Development of skills in the 
recognition, evaluation and control of occu- 
pational health hazards is the focus of this 
concentration. 

Students pursuing this concentration will 
take the required core curriculum, the six 
required credits of internship, research pro- 
ject or thesis and the following elective 
courses: 

EN 610/Environmental Health 
EN 61 2/ Epidemiology 
SH 660/ Industrial Ventilation 
SH 665/Occupational Safety and Health 

Measurements 
Total credits 12 



Operations Research 

Coordinator: Ira H. Kleinfeld, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Eng.Sc.D., 
Columbia University 

Operations research has become an 
important professional discipline in recent 
years. Complex technical problems have 
been examined and solved using advanced 
mathematical techniques and computers. 
The master of science in operations research 
curriculum provides thorough coverage of 
the theory, methodology and application of 
these techniques. The program is designed 
to prepare qualified applicants with solid 
mathematics training — but from otherwise 
diverse backgrounds — to deal with impor- 
tant industrial, business, commercial and 
governmental problems. 

The program centers on a sequence of 
core courses recognized to be of common 
interest to all operations research practition- 
ers of advanced professional standing. 
Students complete the program by choosing 



elective courses in operations research, com- 
puter science, mathematics or other courses 
that are particularly suited to their profes- 
sional interests. Electives should be chosen 
so as to provide a coherent selection meeting 
the student's needs. Once the student and 
an adviser have agreed to these electives, 
they shall become a part of the student's 
program of study. All subsequent changes in 
electives must be made with the adviser's 
advance written consent. 

M.S., Operations Research 

The program consists of 45 credit hours. 
Students entering this program are expected 
to be competent in mathematics through cal- 
culus. Those with insufficient mathematics 
background would be required to take 
approved mathematics course(s) outside the 
program requirements. The transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted 
subject to the Graduate School policy on 
transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this cat- 
alog. Required courses may be waived on 
the basis of undergraduate courses taken at 
accredited institutions. All waivers must be 
approved in writing by the program coordi- 
nator and are contingent upon subsequent 
academic performance. In some cases, the 
coordinator may permit substitution of rele- 
vant courses in place of required courses. 

Research Project/Thesis Requirement 

All students in the program will complete 
a thesis or an appropriate special project 
which will partially fulfill the elective 
requirements for the degree. The special 
project requirement will usually be satisfied 
by taking a research project course in a 
group setting. A designated area of study 
may be indicated for each such research pro- 
ject course; in these cases, the instructor will 
offer direction in the area and will assist stu- 
dents in the development of substantial 
individual projects. Particular requirements 
or prerequisites may be set for the course or 
for those individuals intending to complete 
a project. In appropriate cases having special 
approval, a student may elect to write a the- 
sis or take a research project course (as listed 
in the catalog) on an individual basis. 



Public Administration 73 



Required Courses 

CS 606/FORTRAN Programming 
IE 601 /Introduction to Operations 

Research/Management Science 
IE 607/ Probability Theory 
IE 609 /Descriptive and Inferential Statistics 
IE 621 /Linear Programming 
IE 622/Queueing Theory 
IE 625/Advanced Mathematical 

Programming 
IE 681 /System Simulation 
IE 685 /Theory of Optimization 
IE 687/Stochastic Processes 
IE 688 /Design of Experiments 
Approved Electives (four courses) 
Total credits 45 



Public Administration 

Coordinator: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.PA., West Virginia University 

The general purpose of the master of pub- 
lic administration degree is the training of 
men and women at the graduate level for 
public service careers. Specifically, the pro- 
gram strives to: 

• equip students with modem analytic and 
quantitative tools of decision making and 
their application to complex problems of 
government and nonprofit organizations; 

• expose students to the wide range of 
administrative and managerial problems 
and responsibilities in the public sector; 
and 

• increase the student's knowledge and 
skills in the particular management func- 
tions of budgeting, planning, public poh- 
cy formulation, pubUc finance, public 
personnel administration and collective 
bargaining. 

M.P.A. 

The program consists of 42 graduate cred- 
it hours which are required of candidates for 
this degree. 

Students entering the M.P.A. program 
who lack adequate preparation in quantita- 



tive techniques may be required to enroll in 
a non-credit course, QA 600 Quantitative 
Analysis, in order to satisfy a prerequisite 
requirement. Adequate preparation is 
defined as satisfactory completion of six 
credit hours of quantitative techniques 
and /or mathematics with a grade of "C" or 
better in such coursework. 

Required Courses 

EC 608 /Economics for Public 

Administrators 
PA 601 /Principles of Public Administration 
PA 602 /Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 604/Communities and Social Change 
PA 611 /Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620 /Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
PA 625/Administrative Behavior 
PA 632 /Public Finance and Budgeting 
PA 690/Research Seminar 
Electives or Concentration (five courses) 
Total credits 42 

Concentration in City 
Management 

The courses selected for this concentra- 
tion will enable local government practition- 
ers to develop and make better use of their 
personnel and budgetary resources. This 
ability is especially important today, as the 
federal government is reducing its fiscal 
support to local governments. 

Students choosing the concentration in 
city management will take the required core 
curriculum of nine courses and follow the 
city management concentration in lieu of 
their five elective courses. 

PA 630/Fiscal Management for Local 

Government 
PA 660/Urban Planning: Theory and 

Practice 
PA 661 /Problems of Metropolitan Areas 
PS 616/Urban Government 



74 



Plus one of the following: 

EC 665/Urban and Regional Econonnic 

Development 
P 610/Program Evaluation 
SO 610/Urban Sociology 
Total credits 15 

Concentration in Health Care 
Management 

This concentration is designed for those 
individuals currently in health care manage- 
ment or those who anticipate a career in 
health care management. Courses provide 
students with the conceptual and practical 
skills necessary for the management of a 
health care organization. 

Students choosing the health care concen- 
tration will take the core curriculum of nine 
courses and follow the health care concen- 
tration in lieu of their five elective courses. 

MG 640 /Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 643 /Health and Institutional Planning 
PS 635/Law and Public Health 

Plus one of the following: 

PA 642 /Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 644/Administration of Programs and 

Services for the Aged 
PA 645 /Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 646/Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 647/ Alternative Health Care Dehvery 

Systems 
PA 648/Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 670/Selected Topics 
Total credits 15 

Concentration in Long-Term 
Health Care 

This program is approved by the 
Department of Health Services, State of 
Connecticut, as a course of study in long- 
term health care. Students who complete 



these concentration courses are eligible to 
take the state licensing examination for 
long-term care administration, preparing 
individuals for participation in this area of 
expanding opportunities for health care 
practitioners. 

In the following sequence, PA 646 must 
be taken before or concurrently with PA 681; 
PA 682 must be taken after PA 681 and PA 
646. No waivers, substitutions or transfer 
credits will be permitted in this concentra- 
tion. 

Students choosing the long-term health 
care concentration will take the core curricu- 
lum of nine courses and the four courses in 
the concentration plus one additional elec- 
tive course. 

PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 646/Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facihties 
PA 681 /Long-Term Health Care Internship I 
PA 682/Long-Term Health Care Internship 11 
Total Credits 12 

Concentration in Personnel 
and Labor Relations 

The concentration in personnel and labor 
relations is designed to meet the need for 
better trained personnel and labor relations 
specialists in the pubhc sector. The public 
sector has experienced a growth in union 
membership, but has not had a correspond- 
ing growth in the capability to deal with 
public sector/union relationships. In addi- 
tion, the courses in this concentration will 
provide training for public administrators in 
areas such as employee motivation, organi- 
zational change and group dynamics. 

Students choosing this concentration will 
take the required core curriculum of nine 
courses and foUow the personnel and labor 
relations concentration in lieu of their five 
elective courses. 

MG 645/ Management of Human Resources, 
or SH 602/Safety Organization and 
Administration 



Taxation 75 



Plus two of the following:* 

EC 625/Industrial Relations 

EC 627/ Economics of Labor Relations 

EC 687/Collective Bargaining 

Plus two of the following:** 

CO 621 /Managerial Communication 

MG 664/Organizational Effectiveness 

P 620/Industrial Psychology 

P 628/The Interview 

P 632/Group Dynamics and Group Treatment 

P 640/Industrial Motivation and Morale 

P 642/Organizational Change and 

Development 
P 651 /Organizational Behavior Modification 
Total Credits 15 

'Prerequisite for this group: EC 608 Economics for Public 
Administrators, or permission of the M.P.A. coordinator. 
"Prerequisite for this group: PA 625 Administrative 
Behavior, or permission of the M.P.A. coordinator. 

Taxation 

Coordinator: Robert E. Wnek, Associate 
Professor of Tax Law, Accounting and 
Business Law, LL.M., Boston University 
School of Law, C.P.A. 

The decision by government to utilize its 
taxing authority to pursue a variety of eco- 
nomic and social goals has led to the devel- 
opment of a complex body of tax law. Given 
the dynamic state of society's economic and 
social goals, the body of tax law characteris- 
tically exists in a continual state of change. 

The complexity of tax law is significant 
because of its influence on the economic 
decision-making process and because of its 
impact on the successful achievement of 
society's goals. Tax consequences have been 
and will continue to be an important finan- 
cial consideration. 

Program Objectives 

In recognition of the above, a need to pre- 
pare technically competent individuals for 
careers in the field of taxation has devel- 
oped. Owing to the complex and dynamic 



nature of tax law, it appears appropriate to 
conduct this preparation at an advanced 
level of inquiry with an emphasis upon 
examining the issues of current interest in 
taxation. Accordingly, the master of science 
program in taxation has been designed as a 
framework to accomplish the following 
objectives: 

• to prepare students for technical compe- 
tence in imderstanding and interpreting 
tax law; 

• to famiUarize students with the admiius- 
trative structure and procedures of the 
Internal Revenue Service; 

• to inform students about approaches to 
independent research in the field of tax 
law; and 

• to offer an understanding of the role tax 
law plays in social and economic poUcy. 

Given the above objectives, the master of 
science program in taxation provides a 
framework through wfiich advanced and 
timely tax training can be acquired by expe- 
rienced professionals (accountants and 
attorneys) practicing in the field of taxation, 
as well as individuals seeking to prepare 
themselves for entry into career positions in 
taxation. 

Admission Policy 

Admission to the program is available to 
C.P.A.s, attorneys and persons holding an 
undergraduate degree from an accredited 
institution, preferably, but not exclusively, in 
accounting or in business administration 
with a major in accounting. Persons holding 
other than the above degrees will be 
required to take a number of selected under- 
graduate courses as a condition of admis- 
sion. Admission is based primarily on an 
applicant's undergraduate record; however, 
the promise of academic success is the 
essential factor for admission. In support of 
applications, applicants may submit their 
scores from the Graduate Management 
Admission Test (GMAT). An apphcant may 
be required to take this test. 



76 



M.S., Taxation 

A total of 36 credit hours, including a 
research project, is required for the master 
of science in taxation degree. Students must 
fulfill the requirements of either the corpo- 
rate taxation specialization or public 
taxation specialization. The transfer of credit 
from other institutions will be permitted 
subject to the Graduate School policy 
on transfer credit detailed elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

Corporate Taxation 
Specialization 

A 601 /Individual Income Taxation 
A 602 /Sales and Exchanges of Property 
A 604/Corporate Income Taxation 1 
A 605/Corporate Income Taxation II 
A 607/Tax Accounting 
A 610/ConsoUdated Returns 
A 612/Intemational Taxation 
A 614/Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 
A 615/Research Project in Federal Income 
Taxation 

Plus three of the following: 

A 603 /Qualified Retirement Plans 

A 608 /Estate and Gift Taxation 

A 609/State and Local Taxation 

A 611 /Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 

A 613/Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 

A 61 7/ Estate Planning 

A 670 /Selected Topics( Approved) 

Total credits 36 

Public Taxation Specialization 

A 601 /Individual Income Taxation 
A 602 /Sales and Exchanges of Property 
A 603 /Qualified Retirement Plans 
A 604/Corporate Income Taxation I 
A 605/Corporate Income Taxation II 
A 607/Tax Accounting 
A 608/Estate and Gift Taxation 
A 614/Federal Tax Practice and Procedure 
A 615/Research Project in Federal Income 
Taxation 



Plus three of the following: 

A 609/State and Local Taxation 

A 610/Consolidated Returns 

A 611 /Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts 

A 612/Intemational Taxation 

A 613/Taxation of Partnerships and Partners 

A 617/Estate Planning 

A 670/Selected Topics (Approved) 

Total credits 36 

For practitioners wishing to improve or 
update their tax skills but uncertain about 
pursuing a master's in taxation, two senior 
professional certificates are offered: Taxation 
of Individuals (Option 1) and Taxation of 
Corporations (Option II), as described on 
page 83. 

Practicing C.P.A.s in need of continuing 
education credits and others seeking to 
expand their tax backgrounds should con- 
sider these alternatives. 

Tourism and Travel 
Administration 



(M.B.A.) 



Concentration Adviser: Elisabeth van Dyke, 
Associate Professor of Tourism and Travel 
Administration, Ph.D., Columbia 
University 

The tourism and travel administration 
program, a concentration in the master of 
business administration degree, prepares 
men and women for professional careers in 
the travel industry. 

Forecasters have predicted that in the 
1990s tourism and its related industries will 
be the leading economic factor not only in 
the United States, but in most nations 
throughout the world. 

Academic training for tourism industry 
careers has increased at an unprecedented 
rate during the last decade. More than 50 
two-year college programs are in place. On 
the four-year level, the University of New 
Haven is one of only a few universities in 
the country offering a complete bachelor's 
degree in the field. The M.B.A. concentration 



Tourism and Travel Administration 77 



in tourism and travel is the first program of 
its kind in the nation. 

This program's objectives are to: 

• offer an in-depth knowledge of the travel 
and tourism industry; 

• underscore the interrelationship of the 
travel and tourism industry with national 
and international endeavors of business, 
government and multinational organiza- 
tions; and 

• develop the analytic skills necessary for 
managerial responsibility in all facets of 
the tourism industry. 

Career Opportunities 

As the travel and tourism industry con- 
tinues its expansion, an outstanding variety 
of careers become available in all phases of 
the industry. Graduates of the M.B.A. pro- 
gram can pursue managerial careers in the 
United States as well as overseas. Challeng- 
ing careers exist with international corpora- 
tions and government agencies in the fields 
of aviation and tourism promotion. 
International tourism organizations, many 
of which are now affiliated with the United 
Nations, seek trained managers to staff over- 
seas headquarters. 

State, regional and city tourism offices, 
travel wholesalers, tour operators and travel 
conglomerates have turned to the academic 
world for qualified personnel. As college 
and university programs in tourism 
increase, a teaching career also becomes a 
viable alternative. 

Industry Experience 

Because of the unique nature of the 
tourism and travel industry, students may 
be required to complete a 500-hour 
practicum, evaluated on a case-by-case basis 
depending on the student's experience 
working in this career area. 

Concentration Courses 

A student is required to complete a total 
of 48 credit hours, with or without thesis. A 
master's thesis is recommended but not 
required. Candidates for the M.B.A./ 
Tourism and Travel Administration degree 



electing to write a thesis must register for 
Thesis I and II in the Tourism and Travel 
Department and would substitute these six 
credits of TT 698-699 for MG 690 and one 
elective course in the program. 

The concentration adviser may approve 
substitutions based on the student's previ- 
ous coursework, background in the industry 
and /or work experience in the industry. 

Students with no previous academic back- 
ground in the tourism and travel industry 
are required to take TT 600 The Tourism 
Industry. This non-credit course is an 
overview of the industry. 

In addition to the previously stated 
M.B.A. required courses (see page 37), the 
tourism and travel administration concen- 
tration consists of: 

Any four of the following: 

TT 610/Legal Aspects of the Travel Industry 
TT 620/Deregulation: A New Era in the 

Travel Industry 
TT 625/Travel Industry Human Resources 

Development or MG 645 /Management of 

Human Resources 
TT 630/Intemational Tourism and Travel 
TT 635/Corporate Travel 
TT 660/Comparative Tourism 
TT 670 /Selected Topics 
Total credits 12 



Senior Professional 



Certificates 



These certificates are Umited to those 
already holding an advanced degree who 
want additional graduate study in a coher- 
ent course of study. 

Inasmuch as the senior professional cer- 
tificate is not a degree, a student may trans- 
fer credits earned toward a certificate into a 
master's program at any time, subject to the 
requirements of the master's degree and the 
decision of the coordinator of the master's 
program, and to acceptance in the master's 
program. Professional certificates, for those 
without advanced degrees, are available in 
arson investigation, civil engineering design. 



78 



criminal justice, fire science, forensic science, 
health care management, human resources 
management, industrial hygiene, interna- 
tional relations, legal studies, logistics, long- 
term health care, mental retardation 
services, occupational safety, and pubhc 
administration. 

A student who completes the work 
required for a certificate does not attend 
commencement. A petition for certification 
must be filed with the Graduate Registrar 
and the appropriate fee paid. When the 
coursework is reviewed and found com- 
plete, the certificate will be mailed to the 
student. A minimum QPR of 3.00 is required 
in courses taken at the university as part of 
the senior professional certificates. 

Senior Professional Certificate 
Requirements 

Study consists of 12 to 18 credits, depend- 
ing upon the area chosen. Students, having 
chosen the area of study, should contact the 
adviser who is listed for that particular area. 
Students must meet all course prerequisite 
requirements. 

Course waivers are not permitted for 
senior professional certificates; course sub- 
stitutions may be granted by the adviser. 

Courses of Study 

A broad range of senior professional cer- 
tificates is offered. They are as follows: 

Accounting 

I: Financial Accounting 

II: Managerial Accounting 

III: Accounting Information Systems 
Applications of Psychology 
Computer and Information Science 
Finance 

General Management 
Health Care Management 
Hotel and Restaurant Management 
Human Resources Management 
International Business 
Marketing 

I: Marketing 

II: Quantitative Techniques in Marketing 
Occupational Safety and Health 

Management 



Public Management 

I: Survey of the Field 

II: Public Personnel Management 
Public Safety Management 
Taxation 

I: Taxation of Individuals 

II: Taxation of Corporations 
Telecommunication Management 

Accounting 

Adviser Robert G. McDonald, Associate 
Professor of Accounting, M.B.A., New 
York University; C.M.A., C.I.A., C.FA., 
C.PA. 

The certificates in accounting are recom- 
mended to students and professionals 
whose education already includes an 
accounting degree and who wish to pursue 
accounting at an advanced level without 
necessarily enrolling in the full graduate 
program. They are especially recommended 
to certified pubhc accountants who wish to 
obtain continuing professional education 
credits in an academic environment. 

Option I: Financial Accounting 

A 650 /Advanced Accounting Theory 
A 651 /Financial Accounting Seminar 
A 652/Advanced Auditing 
A 653 /Accounting for the Not-for-Profit 

Organization 
A 654 /Financial Statements: Reporting and 

Analysis 
Total credits 15 

Option II: Managerial Accounting 

Any five of the following: 

A 621 /Managerial Accounting 

A 641 /Accounting Information Systems 

A642/Operational Auditing 

A 661 /Managerial Accounting Seminar 

FI 61 5/ Finance 

FI 645/Corporate Financial Theory 

FI 651 /Portfolio Management and Capital 

Market Analysis 
Total credits 15 



Option III: Accounting Information 
Systems 

A 641 /Accounting Information Systems 
A 642/Operational Auditing 
A 652 /Advanced Auditing 

Plus any two accounting systems or computer 

science courses 
Total credits 15 

Other courses may be substituted with con- 
sent of the adviser. 

Applications of Psychology 

Adviser: Thomas L. Mentzer, Professor of 
Psychology, Ph.D., Browii University 

The certificate in appUcations of psychol- 
ogy is designed to assist professionals who 
wish to acquire specific kinds of skills in 
areas dealing with human services or per- 
sonnel functions. Study can be tailored to 
the needs of either one whose master's 
degree is in a nonpsychological field or one 
with a master's degree in psychology who 
vdshes to broaden skills to a new area of 
psychology. Courses will be selected 
depending upon the student's career objec- 
tives and academic preparation. These 
courses may be from the following list, but 
other courses, independent study or special 
topics courses may be chosen where appro- 
priate. 

Any five of the following: 

P 610/Program Evaluation 

P 621 /Behavior Modification I: Principles, 

Theories and Applications 
P 622/Behavior Modification 11: Advanced 

Theory, Assessment and Application in 

Mental Retardation Settings 
P 623 /Psychology of the Small Group 
P 625/Life Span Developmental Psychology 
P 627/ Attitude and Opinion Measurement 
P 628/The Interview 
P 629/Introduction to Psychotherapy and 

Counseling 
P 632/Group Dynamics and Group 

Treatment 



Psychology Certificate 79 

P 636 /Abnormal Psychology 

P 637/Mental Retardation: History, Theory 

and Practice 
P 638 /Psychology of Communication and 

Opinion Change 
P 641 /Personnel Development and Training 
P 642/Organizational Change and 

Development 
P 651 /Organizational Behavior Modification 
Total credits 15 

Computer and Information 
Science 

Adviser: Roger G. Frey, Professor of 

Computer Science, Ph.D., Yale Uruversity 

This certificate provides a set of courses 
central to the study of computers and com- 
puting. Its domain of application includes 
both scientific and business computing. 

CS 603/Pascal Programming 

CS 616/Assembly Language 

CS 620/Data Structures 

CS 622/Database Systems 

CS 624 /Software Engineering 

Total credits 15 

Note: Students with insufficient comput- 
ing background may be required to take 
CS 602 Computing Fundamentals, in order 
to enter other computer science courses with 
adequate preparation. 

Finance 

Adviser Edward A. Downe, Associate 

Professor of Finance, Ph.D., New School for 
Social Research 

The goal of the finance certificate is to 
prepare individuals for the expanding sector 
of financial services and modern corporate 
financial management. Certificate study 
stresses the understanding of the conceptual 
foundations of finance and uses of analytic 
techniques, with special emphasis on the 
implications and applications of the finan- 
cial concepts. Senior certificate candidates 
are required to meet the prerequisites for FT 
615. It is strongly recommended that the stu- 



80 



dent contact the finance coordinator as early 
as possible to plan the appropriate sequence 
of courses. 

FI 615/Finance 

Plus four of the following: 

FI 617/Financial Institutions and Capital 

Markets 
FI 61 9 /Monetary and Central Banking 

Policy 
FI 620/Working Capital Management and 

Planning 
FI 645/Corporate Financial Theory 
FI 649/Security Analysis 
FI 651 /Portfolio Theory and Capital Market 

Analysis 
FI 655/Speculative Market Analysis 
Total credits 15 

Other courses may be substituted with the 
written approval of the adviser. 

General Management 

Adviser: Robert W. Baeder, Professor of 
Management, Ph.D., Ohio State University 

The certificate is designed to develop stu- 
dents' conceptual knowledge and skills in 
formulating corporate strategy and in deter- 
mining structural and resource require- 
ments. The program focuses on concepts 
and processes useful in relation to general 
management and on functional responsibili- 
ties in coordinating and directing the organi- 
zational effort in our ever-changing 
economic environment. Students should 
note that MG 637 is prerequisite to this pro- 
gram. Additional prerequisites required for 
some of the courses in the certificate are list- 
ed in the course descriptions elsewhere in 
the catalog. 

MG 663/Leadership in Organizations 
MG 664/Organizational Effectiveness 
MG 669/Advanced Business Policy 



Plus three of the following: 

MG 645 /Management of Human Resources 
MG 660/Comparative Management 
MG 662/Organization Theory 
MG 680/Current Topics in Business 

Administration 
Total credits 18 

Other management courses may be permit- 
ted as substitutions with the approval of the 
adviser. 

Health Care Management 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate will be useful for decision 
makers employed in the public, private or 
nonprofit sectors of the health care field. 
Coursework will provide medical personnel 
with additional background and skills to 
enhance personal and professional develop- 
ment. 

MG 640/Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 643/Health and Institutional Planning 
PS 635 /Law and Public Health 

Plus one of the following: 

PA 642/Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 644/Administration of Programs and 

Services for the Aged 
PA 645/Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 646/Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 647/ Alternative Health Care Delivery 

Systems 
PA 648/Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 670/Selected Topics 
Total credits 15 

The certificate in long-term health care, 
leading to eligibility for the State of 
Connecticut licensing examination in long- 
term care administration, is described on 
page 89. 



Hotel and Restaurant 
Management 

Adviser: James F. Downey, Professor of 
Hotel and Restaurant Management, 
Ph.D., Purdue University 



This certificate is designed to develop 
analytic skills necessary for the competent 
and profitable operation of a hospitality 
facihty. It expands the student's awareness 
in and underscores the importance of those 
financial, economic, marketing and statisti- 
cal factors which contribute to the success of 
a hospitahty operation. 

HR 605 /Hospitality Corporate Law 

HR 630 /Personnel and Labor Relations in 

Hotel and Restaurant Operations 
HR 635/Hospitality Industry Capital 

Budgeting and Managerial Accounting 
HR 650 /Hospitality Corporate Marketing 
HR 655 /Development of Hotel and 

Restaurant Operations 
HR 670/Selected Topics 
Total credits 18 

Human Resources 
Management 

Adviser: Judith A. Neal, Associate Professor 
of Management, Ph.D., Yale University 

This certificate is designed for the person- 
nel professional or persons in other fields 
who aspire to the personnel function. It also 
serves the needs of the individual whose 
previous degrees are not related to human 
resources management or who is looking for 
an update without necessarily pursuing a 
specialized degree. 

MG 645 /Management of Human Resources 
MG 678 /Personnel Management Seminar 

Phis four of the following: 

EC 625/Industrial Relations 

EC 627/ Economics of Labor Relations 

EC 687/Collective Bargaining 

MG 663 /Leadership in Organizations 

MG 664/OrganizationaI Effectiveness 



Hotel and Restaurant Management Certificate 81 

MG 665/Compensation Administration 

MG 679 /Industrial Relations Seminar 

P 627/ Attitude and Opinion Measurement 

P 628/The Interview 

P 641 /Personnel Development and Training 

PA 620 /Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
Total credits 18 



Course substitutions may be permitted 
depending upon the background of the stu- 
dent and subject to the approval of the 
adviser. 

International Business 

Adviser: Michael Kublin, Associate 

Professor of Marketing and International 
Business, Ph.D., New York University 

This certificate is designed to prepare 
managers to deal with the current problems 
and methods of analysis related to interna- 
tional business. This includes basic tech- 
niques and skills, such as adapting to new 
political and cultural environments, which 
are not normally covered by traditional 
courses. 

FI 644/Intemational Financial Management 
IB 643/International Business 

Plus three of the following: 

EC 641 /International Economics 

IB 645/Comparative International Business 

Environments 
IB 651 /International Marketing 
IB 652 /Multinational Business Management 
IB 660 /East and Southeast Asian Business 

Systems 
MG 660/Comparative Management 
Total credits 15 

Marketing 

Adviser: David J. Morris, Jr., Associate 
Professor of Marketing, Ph.D., Syracuse 
University 

The certificate in marketing allows the 
student to acquire a deeper understanding 
of marketing phenomena and to develop 



82 



analytic skills. Special emphasis is given to 
the development of content knowledge and 
skills necessary for operating managers of 
the marketing function. It is suggested that 
Marketing Management and Marketing 
Research and Information Systems, if taken, 
be preceded by other courses in the pro- 
gram. Note that MK 609 and MG 637 are 
prerequisites for the certificate. 

Option I: Marketing 

MK 641 /Marketing Management 

Plus one course in international business and 
three of the following: 

MG 669 /Advanced Business Policy 
MK 616/Buyer Behavior 
MK 638 /Competitive Marketing Strategy 
MK 639 /Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 
MK 643 /Product Management 
MK 645 /Distribution Strategy 
MK 680/Marketing Workshop 
Total credits 15 

Option II: Quantitative Techniques 
in Marketing 

This specialization will enable the student 
to utilize the latest quantitative methods to 
redefine and to plan the corporate scope of a 
business. It is critical for problem solving at 
both strategic and tactical levels. Particular 
emphasis is placed on marketing distribu- 
tion problems by the intensive study of 
transportation and logistics. 

CS 606 /FORTRAN Programming 
QA 604 /Probability and Statistics 

Plus three of the following: 

IE 615/Transportation and Distribution 
MK 639/Marketing Research and 

Information Systems 
MK 641 /Marketing Management 
QA 607/ Forecasting 
Total credits 15 



Occupational Safety and 
Health Management 

Adviser: Brad T. Garber, Professor of 
Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

This senior professional certificate pre- 
pares individuals to manage a comprehen- 
sive safety and health program. It is 
designed to fit the needs of those persons 
who already hold an advanced degree but 
who desire specific training in this dynamic 
field. The wide variety of course offerings 
allows students to select courses that best 
meet their individual needs. 

Ay\y five of the following: 

SH 602 /Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 605 /Industrial Safety Engineering 
SH 608 /Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 61 5 /Toxicology 

SH 620 /Occupational Safety and Health Law 
SH 630/Product Safety and Liability 
SH 660/Industrial Ventilation 
SH 661 /Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 665/Occupational Safety and Health 

Measurements 
Total credits 15 

Other courses may be substituted with con- 
sent of the adviser. 

Public Management 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate in public management is 
designed to provide a broad overview of the 
most up-to-date thinking in public manage- 
ment. Courses emphasize conceptual and 
analytic skill building. Students may select 
either a survey of the field or public person- 
nel management. 



Option I: Survey of the Field 

Any five of the following: 

EC 665 /Urban and Regional Economic 

Development 
PA 611 /Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620/Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
PA 625/Administrative Behvaior 
PA 630/Fiscal Management for Local 

Government 
PA 632/Pubhc Finance and Budgeting 
PA 660/Urban Planning: Theory and 

Practice 
PS 608/The Legislative Process 
Total credits 15 

Option II: Public Personnel 
Management 

EC 625/Industrial Relations 

MG 645/Management of Human Resources 

PA 620/Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Pubhc Sector 
PA 625 /Administrative Behavior 

Plus one of the following: 

MG 665 /Compensation Administration 
P 627/ Attitude and Opinion Measurement 
P 635/ Assessment of Human Performance 

with Standardized Tests 
Total credits 15 

Public Safety Management 

Advisen Frederick Mercilhott, Professor of 
Professional Studies, Ph.D., City 
University of New York; D.A., Western 
Colorado University 

This senior professional certificate 
includes additional courses and a further 
educational goal for those public safety pro- 
fessionals who have already completed the 
master's degree. 

FS 681 /Seminar/Research Project in Pubhc 

Safety Management 1 
FS 682/Seminar/Research Project in PubUc 

Safety Management II 



Public Management Certificates 83 

FS 683/Seminar/Research Project on 
Comparative PubUc Safety Systems 

Plus one of the following: 

CO 63f /Public Information Dynamics 
EC 665 /Urban and Regional Economic 

Development 
MG 645/Management of Human Resources 
PA 620/Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Pubhc Sector 
PA 630/Fiscal Management for Local 

Government 
PA 660/Urban Planning: Theory and 

Practice 
PS 635/Law and Public Health 
SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 620/Occupational Safety and Health 

Law 
Total credits 12 

Taxation 

Adviser: Robert E. Wnek, Associate 
Professor of Tax Law, Accounting and 
Business Law, LL.M., Boston University 
School of Law, C.P.A. 

This certificate is for practitioners who 
wish to improve or update their tax skills, 
including practicing C.P.A.s needing contin- 
uing education credits and others seeking to 
expand their tax backgrounds. 

Option I: Taxation of Individuals 

A 601 /Individual Income Taxation 
A 602/Sales and Exchanges of Property 
A 603 /Qualified Retirement Plans 
A 608/Estate and Gift Taxation 

Plus one taxation elective 

Total credits 15 

Option II: Taxation of Corporations 

A 604/Corporate Income Taxation I 
A 605/Corporate Income Taxation II 
A 610/Consohdated Returns 

Plus two taxation electives 

Total credits 15 

Other courses may be substituted with con- 
sent of the adviser. 



84 



Telecommunication 
Management 

Adviser: Jerry L. Allen, Professor of 

Communication, Ph.D., Southern lUinois 
University 

This certificate is designed to prepare 
telecommunication managers to deal with 
the current problems and methods of analy- 
sis pertinent to this fast-changing field and 
to end users, suppliers and common carriers 
of telecommunications services and facili- 
ties. Courses emphasize conceptual factors 
and analytic skills. 

CO 640*/Communications Technologies 
CO 643/Telecommunications Policy and 
Strategy 

Plus any three of the following: 

CO 641 /Competition and Regulation in 

Telecommunications 
CO 642 /Management of 

Telecommunications Organizations 
CS 642 /Computer Networks and Data 

Communication 
LA 673 /Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 
MG 638/Cost Benefit Management 
Total credits 15 

*Students ivho have had the equhmlent of CO 640, either 
through work experience or educational courses given by a 
common carrier, may substitute another elective from the 
elective list or another course with the consejit of the adviser. 



Professional 
Certificates 



These certificates are available to persons 
having undergraduate degrees who want to 
continue study at the graduate level. 

Inasmuch as the professional certificate is 
not a degree, a student may transfer credits 
earned toward a certificate into a master's 
program at any time, subject to the require- 
ments of the master's program and the deci- 
sion of the coordinator of the master's 



program, and to acceptance in the master's 
program. 

A student who completes work required 
for a certificate does not attend commence- 
men. A petition for certification must be 
filed with the Graduate Registrar and the 
appropriate fee paid. When the coursework 
is reviewed and found complete, the certifi- 
cate will be mailed to the student. A mini- 
mum QPR of 3.00 is required in courses 
taken at the university as part of the profes- 
sional certificates. 

Professional Certificate 
Requirements 

Coursework consists of 12 to 21 credits, 
depending upon the area chosen. Students, 
having chosen the area of study, should con- 
tact the adviser who is Hsted for that partic- 
ular area. Students must meet all course 
prerequisite requirements. 

Course waivers are not permitted for pro- 
fessional certificates; course substitutions 
may be granted by the adviser. 

Courses of Study 

A number of professional certificates are 
available for qualified students. They are as 
follows: 

Arson Investigation 

Civil Engineering Design 

Criminal Justice/Security Management 

Fire Science Administration and Technology 

Forensic Science/Advanced Investigation 

Forensic Science/CriminaUstics 

Forensic Science/ Fire Science 

Health Care Management 

Human Resources Management 

Industrial Hygiene 

International Relations 

Legal Studies 

Logistics 

Logistics / Advanced 

Long-Term Health Care 

Mental Retardation Services 

Occupational Safety 

Public Administration 



Arson Investigation 

Advisen Frederick Mercilliott, Professor of 
Professional Studies, Ph.D., City 
University of New York; D.A., Western 
Colorado University 

This certificate offers an opportunity for 
students who hold the baccalaureate degree 
to continue their study of arson investiga- 
tion at the graduate level. 

Any four of the following: 

CJ 608/Law and Evidence 

CJ 649 /Fire Scene Investigation and Arson 

Analysis (4 credits) 
FS 665/Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson 

Investigation 
FS 667/ Fire and Building Codes, Standards 

and Practices 
FS 668 /Fire and Casualty Insurance 

Practices 
FS 669 /Dynamics, Evaluation and 

Prevention of Structural Fires 
FS 670 /Selected Topics 
Total credits 12-13 

Civil Engineering Design 

Adviser: David J. Wall, Professor of Civil 
and Environmental Engineering, Ph.D., 
University of Pittsburgh 

The certificate in civil engineering design 
provides professional studies beyond the 
baccalaureate level in the major disciplines 
within civil engineering. The student, with 
the adviser, selects courses that best satisfy 
the student's professional interests. Areas of 
specialization are construction, geotechnical 
engineering, hydraulics and hydrology, and 
structural engineering. Accreditation appli- 
cation to the Board of Governors for Higher 
Education, State of Connecticut, for this cer- 
tificate in civil engineering design is in pro- 
cess. 

Candidates for admission will be expect- 
ed to have an engineering degree from a 
program accredited by the Accreditation 
Board for Engineering and Technology 
(ABET). Engineering degrees presented 



Arson Investigation Certificate 85 

from foreign institutions will be evaluated 
individually. Candidates are required to 
complete six courses or a total of 18 credits 
for the certificate. Courses must be selected, 
with the adviser's approval, from the fol- 
lowing: 

CE 620 /Engineering Hydrology 
CE 621 /Advanced Hydrology 
CE 623 /Open Channel HydrauUcs 
CE 624 /Computer Applications in 

Hydrology /HydrauUcs 
CE 627/Groundwater Hydrology 
CE 630 /Reinforced Concrete Design 
CE 631 /Structural Steel Design 
CE 632/Load and Resistance Factor Design 

for Structural Steel 
CE 633 /Wood Engineering 
CE 634/Prestressed Concrete Design 
CE 640/Structural Analysis 
CE 650/Soil Mechanics I 
CE 651 /Soil Mechanics II 
CE 652 /Foundation Engineering I 
CE 653/Foundation Engineering II 
CE 660 /Project Planning 
CE 678 /Computer AppHcations in Civil 

Engineering 
LA 673/Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 
Total credits 18 

Criminal Justice/Security 
Management 

Adviser: David A. Maxwell, Professor of 
Criminal Justice, M.A., John Jay College; 
J.D., University of Miami 

The certificate is designed for those pro- 
fessionals who wish to enhance their knowl- 
edge and skills in security management. 
Application for admission to the profession- 
al certificate in security management is open 
to all persons who hold an undergraduate 
degree from an accredited institution of 
higher education. 

CJ 612/Criminal Justice Management 
CJ 669/Dynamics, Evaluation and 

Prevention of Structural Fires 
CJ 675 /Private Security Law 
CJ 676 /Security Management Seminar 
CJ 677/ Private Security in Modem Society 



86 



SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
Total credits 



18 



Fire Science Administration 
and Technology 

Adviser: Frederick Mercilliott, Professor of 
Professional Studies; Ph.D., City 
University of New York; D.A., Western 
Colorado University 

This certificate in fire science provides a 
course of study for fire, public safety, insur- 
ance and security professionals who need to 
acquire the latest adnninistrative and techno- 
logical techniques in the field of fire science. 

Candidates for the professional certificate 
in fire science administration and technolo- 
gy are required to have a B.S. degree in fire 
science or a related field. Candidates are 
required to complete seven courses or a total 
of 21 credits, including: 

FS 625/Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 
FS 667/ Fire and Building Codes, Standards 

and Practices 
FS 668/Fire and Casualty Insurance Practices 
FS 669/ Dynamics, Evaluation and 

Prevention of Structural Fires 

Plus any three of the following: 

CJ 677/Private Security in Modern Society 

CJ 695/lndependent Study 

FS 670 /Selected Topics 

P 61 9 /Organizational Behavior 

P 695/lndividual Intensive Study I 

SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 620/Occupational Safety and Health 

Law 
Total credits 21 

Forensic Science/Advanced 
Investigation 

Adviser: R.E. Gaensslen, Professor of 
Forensic Science, Ph.D., Cornell 
University 

CJ 614/Survey of Forensic Science 

CJ 616/Advanced Crime Scene Investigation 



CJ 632/Advanced Investigation I 
CJ 633 /Advanced Investigation II 

Plus two of the following: 

CJ 608/ Law and Evidence 

CJ 620 /Advanced Criminalistics I 

CJ 640 /Advanced Criminalistics II 

CJ 653/Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 

CJ 661 /Medicolegal Investigation and 

Identification 
CJ 673 /Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science 
PS 605 /Criminal Law 
Total credits 18 

Forensic 
Science/Criminalistics 

Adviser: R.E. Gaensslen, Professor of 
Forensic Science, Ph.D., Cornell 
University 

CJ 620/Advanced Criminalistics I 
CJ 621 /Advanced Criminahstics I 

Laboratory (one credit) 
CJ 640/Advanced Criminalistics II 
CJ 641 /Advanced Criminalistics II 

Laboratory (one credit) 
CJ 653/Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 
CJ 654 /Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 

Laboratory (one credit) 
CJ 673 /Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science 
CJ 674 /Biomedical Methods in Forensic 

Science Laboratory (one credit) 

Plus one of the following: 

CH 621 /Chemical Forensic Analysis with 

Laboratory (four credits) 
CH 631 /Advances in Analytic Chemistry 
CJ 610/ Administration of Justice 
CJ 614/Survey of Forensic Science 
Total credits 19 or 20 



Forensic Science Certificate 87 



Forensic Science/Fire Science 

Advisen R.E. Gaensslen, Professor of 
Forensic Science, Ph.D., Cornell 
University 

CJ 640/Advanced Criminalistics II 

CJ 649 /Fire Science Investigation and Arson 

Analysis (four credits) 
CJ 653/Physical Analysis in Forensic Science 
FS 665 /Legal Aspects of Fire and Arson 

Investigation 

Plus any tivo of the following: 

CH 625 /Chemistry of Fires and Explosions 

CJ 614/Survey of Forensic Science 

CJ 667/ Fire and Building Codes, Standards 

and Practices 
CJ 668 /Fire and Casualty Insurance 

Practices 
CJ 669 /Dynamics, Evaluation and 

Prevention of Structural Fires 
CJ 684 /Fire /Accident Scene Reconstruction 
CJ 693/Criminal Justice Internship I 
Total credits 19 

Health Care Management 

Advisen Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, M.P.A., 
West Virginia University 

This certificate will be useful for profes- 
sionals employed in the pubUc, private or 
non-profit sectors of the health care field. 
Coursework will provide students with 
skills necessary for personal development 
and increased professionahsm as well as the 
opportunity for organizational advance- 
ment. 

MG 640 /Management of Health Care 

Organizations 
PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 643/Health and Institutional Planning 
PS 635 /Law and Public Health 

Plus two of the following: 

PA 642 /Health Care Delivery Systems 
PA 644 /Administration of Programs and 



Services for the Aged 
PA 645/Health Care Economics and Finance 
PA 646/Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 647/Alternative Health Care Delivery 

Systems 
PA 648 /Contemporary Issues in Health Care 
PA 670/Selected Topics 
Total credits 18 

Human Resources 
Management 

Adviser: Judith A. Neal, Associate Professor 
of Management, Ph.D., Yale University 

This certificate is designed for the human 
resources professional or the individual in 
another field who aspires to work in human 
resources management. It provides an 
overview of the field and an opportunity to 
study various subfunctions (such as train- 
ing, compensation or industrial relations) in 
greater depth. 

Candidates for the professional certificate 
in human resources management are 
required to have a B.S. in business adminis- 
tration or a related field. Candidates are 
required to complete six courses, or a total of 
18 credits, including: 

MC 637/Management 

MC 645/Management of Human Resources 

MC 678 /Personnel Management Seminar 

Plus three of the following: 

EC 625 /Industrial Relations 

EC 687/Collective Bargaining 

MG 664/Organizational Effectiveness 

MG 665/Compensation Administration 

P 619/Organizational Behavior 

P 628/The Interview 

P 641 /Personnel Development and Training 

P 642/Organizational Change and 

Development 
P 643 /The Psychology of Conflict 

Management 
SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
Total credits 18 



88 



Industrial Hygiene 

Advisen Brad T. Garber, Professor of 
Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

This certificate is designed for practicing 
professionals who wish to increase their 
knowledge and skills in industrial hygiene 
as well as for persons who wish to enter this 
field. Courses of study are individually tai- 
lored to the specific occupational needs of 
each applicant. 

A total of 15 credits in industrial hygiene, 
toxicology and related fields must be com- 
pleted. Students, in consultation with the 
adviser, will design a course of study con- 
sisting of the following offerings or 
approved substitutes. 

Any five of the following: 

SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 608/Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 611 /OSH Research Methods and 

Techniques 
SH 615/Toxicology 
SH 660/Industrial Ventilation 
SH 661 /Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 665/Occupational Safety and Health 

Measurements 
Total credits 15 

Other courses may be substituted with con- 
sent of the adviser. 

International Relations 

Advisen James W. Dull, Professor of PoUtical 
Science, Ph.D., Columbia University 

This certificate is designed to introduce 
students to elements of international life that 
are relevant to the growth of a global politi- 
cal-economic system. Courses will provide 
increased knowledge and awareness in the 
area of international relations for corporate 
executives, teachers and professionals. 
Factors such as power, diplomacy, law, 
trade, monetary affairs, multinational corpo- 



rations, investment, aid and differing cultur- 
al and geographical characteristics will be 
examined. 

HS 607/ World History in the Twentieth 

Century 
PS 606/Advanced International Relations 
PS 641 /The Politics of the World Economy 

Phis one of the following: 

HS 670/Selected Topics 

HS 695 /Independent Study 

IB 643/Intemational Business 

PS 603/International Law 

PS 604 /Human Rights and the Law 

PS 625/Transnational Legal Structures 

PS 628/Change and Government 

PS 645 /Government and the Industrial 

Sector 
PS 670/Selected Topics 
PS 695 /Independent Study 
Total credits 12 

Legal Studies 

Adviser: James W. Dull, Professor of 
Political Science, Ph.D., Columbia 
University 

This certificate is designed to provide the 
student with a background in and orienta- 
tion to constitutional and legal issues in con- 
temporary American and global societies by 
exploring basic constitutional principles and 
the levels at which legal conflicts may arise. 
Students will be introduced to basic princi- 
ples and practices in the American legal sys- 
tem, including some elements that pertain to 
international activity, and will learn to rec- 
ognize areas of potential legal conflict at all 
levels of the system-legislative, judicial, 
administrative and regulatory. 

PS 601 /Constitutional Law 
PS 610/Legal Methods I 
PS 655/Conflict Resolution 

Plus one of the following: 

LA 673/Business Law I: Contracts and Sales 
PA 650/ Administrative Law 



PS 602/CivU Liberties and Rights 

PS 603 /International Law 

PS 604 /Human Rights and the Law 

PS 605/Criminal Law 

PS 608/The Legislative Process 

PS 612/Contracts, Torts and the Practice of 

Law 
PS 616/Urban Government 
PS 61 7/ Law, Science and Ethics 
PS 625 /Transnational Legal Structures 
PS 626/Decision Making in the PoUtical 

Process 
PS 628/Change and Government 
PS 633/The PoUtical Process and the Aged 
PS 635/Law and Public Health 
PS 640/Law and Education 
PS 645/Govemment and the Industrial 

Sector 
PS 670/Selected Topics 
PS 695 /Independent Study 
Total credits 12 

Logistics 

Adviser: Alexis N. Sommers, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

This certificate provides a basic working 
knowledge of logistics and background for 
certification in the discipline. Although an 
old field of study traditionally associated 
wdth the military, logistics has emerged as 
an important management specialty in orga- 
nizations dealing with complex systems and 
large, multiphase projects. Modern logistics 
is the science of making sure that needs are 
met when they occur, at a reasonable 
resource expenditure. This necessitates cus- 
tomer requirements planning, design-to-cost 
concepts, optimal system acquisition, life 
cycle analysis, transportation and distribu- 
tion, and field support networks. Especially 
in defense industries, logistics is essential in 
designing, acquiring and introducing new 
weapons systems, new communication and 
supply systems, and advanced production 
and distribution concepts. 

LG 660/Logistics Technology and 
Management 



Logistics Certificate 89 

Plus three of the following: 

IE 61 5 /Transportation and Distribution 
LG 663 /Logistics Management in the 

System Acquisition Process 
LG 665 /Integrated Logistics Support Analysis 
LG 669/Life Cycle Cost Analysis 
MG 638 /Cost Benefit Management 
Total credits 12 

Logistics/Advanced 

Adviser: Alexis N. Sommers, Professor of 
Industrial Engineering, Ph.D., Purdue 
University 

This certificate provides advanced train- 
ing for logistics professionals who seek to 
continue their education. For the logistics 
professional employed in the defense indus- 
try, a working knowledge of logistics strate- 
gy, new logistics research and the impact of 
high technology is an essential part of pro- 
fessional development. This certificate is 
open to those students who have a back- 
ground in logistics, such as completion of 
the university's M.B.A. program with a con- 
centration in logistics or equivalent logistics 
training. 

LG 672 /Designing for Logistics Support 
LG 673 /Human Engineering in Logistics 

Support 
LG 675 /Logistics Techniques and Policy 
LG 676/Logistics Products 
Total credits 12 

Long-Term Health Care 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate is approved by the 
Department of Health Services, State of 
Connecticut, as a course of study in long- 
term health care. Students who complete 
this 12-credit course of study are eligible to 
take the state licensing examination for 
long-term care administration, preparing 
individuals for participation in this area of 
expanding opportunities for health care 
practitioners. 



90 



In the following sequence, PA 646 must 
be taken before or concurrently with PA 681; 
PA 682 must be taken after PA 681 and PA 
646. No waivers, substitutions or transfer 
credits will be permitted for this certificate. 

PA 641 /Financial Management of Health 

Care Organizations 
PA 646/Organization and Management of 

Long-Term Care Facilities 
PA 681 /Long-Term Health Care Internship I 
PA 682 /Long-Term Health Care Internship n 
Total credits 12 

Mental Retardation Services 

Adviser: Robert Hoffnung, Professor of 
Psychology, Ph.D., University of 
Cincinnati 

This certificate encompasses those cours- 
es from the mental retardation services con- 
centration in the master's program in 
community psychology which are most 
directly related to the graduate training of 
professionals in the field of mental retarda- 
tion. The certificate emphasizes those skill 
areas, particularly behavior modification 
techniques, which are needed by profession- 
als working in residential facilities for men- 
tally retarded adults. 

P 605/Survey of Community Psychology 
P 621 /Behavior Modification I: Principles, 

Theories and Applications 
P 622/ Behavior Modification II: Advanced 

Theory, Assessment and Application in 

Mental Retardation Settings 
P 637/ Mental Retardation: History, Theory 

and Practice 
Total credits 12 

Occupational Safety 

Adviser: Brad T. Garber, Professor of 
Occupational Safety and Health, Ph.D., 
University of California, Berkeley 

This certificate is designed for profession- 
als who wish to increase their knowledge 
and skills in occupational safety as well as 
for persons who wish to enter this field. 



Courses of study are individually tailored to 
the specific occupational needs of each 
applicant. 

A total of 15 credits in the safety and 
hygiene field must be completed. Students, 
in consultation with the adviser, will design 
a course of study consisting of the following 
offerings or approved substitutes. 

Any five of the following: 

SH 602/Safety Organization and 

Administration 
SH 605/ Industrial Safety Engineering 
SH 608/Industrial Hygiene Practices 
SH 611 /OSH Research Methods and 

Techniques 
SH 620/Occupational Safety and Health Law 
SH 630/Product Safety and Liability 
SH 661 /Microcomputers in Occupational 

Safety and Health 
SH 665/Occupational Safety and Health 

Measurements 
Total credits 15 

Other courses may be substituted with con- 
sent of the adviser. 

Public Administration 

Adviser: Charles Coleman, Assistant 
Professor of Public Administration, 
M.P.A., West Virginia University 

This certificate is designed to provide 
training at the graduate level for people in 
public service. Coursework focuses on the 
analytic, quantitative, administrative and 
managerial knowledge and skills needed to 
meet the complex problems and responsibil- 
ities of government organizations. 

PA 601 /Principles of Public Administration 
PA 602/ Public Policy Formulation and 

Implementation 
PA 611 /Research Methods in Public 

Administration 
PA 620/Personnel Administration and 

Collective Bargaining in the Public Sector 
PA 632/Public Finance and Budgeting 



Public Administration Certificate 91 

Plus one of the following: 

EC 608 /Economics for Public 

Administrators 
PA 604/Communities and Social Change 
PA 625/Administrative Behavior 
PA 670/Selected Topics 
Total credits 18 



93 



COURSES 



Unless otherwise indicated, 
all graduate courses carry three 
credit hours. For purposes of 
brevity, course descriptions may 
not follow traditional rules of 
grammar. Course descriptions 
are arranged alphabetically by 
prefix code, not by subject title. 



Accounting 



A 600 Accounting 

The principles and proce- 
dures underlying the generation 
of financial accounting informa- 
tion. No credit. 



A 601 Individual Income 
Taxation 

A study of tax policy and the 
fundamental principles of the 
federal income tax law taught at 
an advanced level of inquiry. 
Coverage entails the key con- 
cepts of gross income, adjusted 
gross income, deductions, ex- 
emptions, credits and special tax 
computations, with attention 
given to the provisions of the 
Internal Revenue Code affecting 
individual taxpayers. 



A 602 Sales and Exchanges of 
Property 

Prerequisite: A 601. A contin- 
uation of Individual Income Tax- 
ation emphasizing the funda- 
mental principles concerning 
dispositions of property: analysis 
of basis, recognition of gain or 
loss, capital asset transactions, 
non-recognition exchanges and 
depreciation recapture. 

A 603 Qualified Retirement 
Plans 

Prerequisite: A 602. An exami- 
nation of the fundamentals of the 
federal taxation of deferred com- 
pensation. The course will focus 
on qualified retirement plans and 
individual and self-employed re- 
tirement plans as developed by 
the Employment Retirement In- 
come Security Act of 1974 and 
subsequent legislation. Deferred 
executive compensation arrange- 
ments, stock options, restricted 
property, tax deferred annuities 
and various employee benefit 
plans will also be reviewed. 

A 604 Corporate Income 
Taxation I 

Prerequisite: A 602. A founda- 
tion course analyzing the basic 
federal income tax provisions af- 
fecting corporations and share- 
holders. Course coverage in- 
cludes organization of the 
corporation, corporate capital 
structure, corporate distribu- 
tions, stock redemptions, bail- 
out techniques and liquidations. 



A 605 Corporate Income 
Taxation II 

Prerequisite: A 604. Advanced 
study in the corporate tax area 
including Subchapter S corpora- 
tions, collapsible corporations, 
accumulated earnings and per- 
sonal holding company taxes, af- 
filiated corporations, carryover 
of corporate tax attributes, and 
corporate reorganizations and 
divisions. 



A 607 Tax Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 601. Investi- 
gation of such areas as: problems 
of allocating income and deduc- 
tions to the proper tax year, per- 
missible tax accounting methods, 
depreciation, inventory methods, 
individual net operating losses, 
change in accounting methods, 
and comparison of business and 
tax accounting principles. 

A 608 Estate and Gift Taxation 

A comprehensive introduc- 
tion to, and analysis of, the feder- 
al estate and gift tax laws includ- 
ing basic principles of estate 
planning. Procedures for prepa- 
ration of the estate and gift tax 
returns are treated. Coverage is 
given to state death and inheri- 
tance taxes. 



94 



A 609 State and Local Taxation 

Tax problems encountered at 
the state and local level by busi- 
nesses engaged in interstate 
commerce. Federal limitations on 
the taxation of multistate enter- 
prises and jurisdictional prob- 
lems are examined. Specific areas 
covered are: license to do busi- 
ness, net income, franchise, gross 
receipts, property, and sales and 
use taxes. Apportionment prob- 
lems are examined in detail. 

A 610 Consolidated Retiims 

Prerequisite; A 604. A thor- 
ough analysis of the federal con- 
solidated tax return provisions in- 
cluding eligibility and whether to 
file a consolidated return, inter- 
company transactions and defer- 
ral concepts, basis in the disposi- 
tion of stock of a subsidiary, 
computation of earnings and 
profits, mechanics of preparing 
the consolidated return. 



A 611 Income Taxation of Estates 
and Trusts 

Prerequisite: A 602. Federal in- 
come taxation of estates, trusts, 
grantors and beneficiaries. Topics 
are simple and complex trusts, 
throwback rules, taxable and dis- 
tributable net income, assignment 
of income concepts and income in 
respect of a decedent, preparation 
of the estate and trust returns. 

A 612 International Taxation 

Prerequisite: A 604. Consider- 
ation of the federal income tax 
treatment of nonresident aliens 
and foreign corporations and the 
foreign income of U.S. residents 
and domestic corporations; com- 
parison of alternative methods of 
engaging in operations abroad; 
foreign tax credit; allocations 
under code Section 482; Section 
367 rulings; and the effect of tax 
treaties. 



A 613 Taxation of Partnerships 
and Partners 

Prerequisite: A 602. A study 
of the federal income tax prob- 
lems encountered in the forma- 
tion and operation of a partner- 
ship including computations of 
taxable income, sale of a partner- 
ship interest, withdrawal of a 
partner, death or retirement of a 
partner, distribution of partner- 
ship assets and basis adjust- 
ments. 



A 614 Federal Tax Practice and 
Procedure 

Prerequisite: A 601. A study 
of the history and organization 
of the Internal Revenue Service, 
the selection of returns for audit 
and the review steps at the ad- 
ministrative level. Code provi- 
sions covered will include: filing 
requirements, statutory notices, 
restriction on assessment, statute 
of limitations, refund procedures, 
waivers, closing agreements, 
protests and rulings. 

A 615 Research Project in 
Federal Income Taxation 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours in taxation. A study of the 
techniques and tools of tax re- 
search. Reference sources in- 
clude: tax loose-leaf services, 
I.R.S. cumulative bulletins, court 
cases, congressional committee 
reports, textbooks, published ar- 
ticles. Research projects will be 
assigned for written submission. 



A 616 Taxation for Management 

Introduction to federal taxa- 
tion and its impact on business 
decision making. Overview of 
the basics of federal taxation, its 
traps and tax planning opportu- 
nities. Complete overview of all 
areas of federal taxation to un- 
derstand the tax planning for 
personal and business situations 
and the interrelationship of tax 
planning decisions. Areas of 
federal taxation covered are: in- 
dividual income taxes, corpora- 
tion income taxes, S corpora- 
tions, partnerships, income 
taxation of estates and trusts, es- 
tate and gift taxes. Not open to 
M.S. in taxation program students. 

A 617 Estate Planning 

Prerequisite: A 608. The essen- 
tial elements of estate planning 
under current law. Includes gift 
planning as well as death trans- 
fers in the general context of 
family financial planning; also, 
personal planning considera- 
tions, as well as tax savings. State 
succession taxes will be re- 
viewed. 



A 621 Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisite: A 600 or six 
credits in financial accounting. 
Accounting analysis for the man- 
agerial functions of planning, 
controlling and evaluating the 
performance of the business 
firm. 



A 641 Accounting Information 
Systems 

Prerequisite: A 621 . An exam- 
ination of the function and limi- 
tations of internal accounting in- 
formation systems and their 
relationship to other decision- 
oriented business information 
systems. 



Courses 95 



A 642 Operational Auditing 

Prerequisite: A 621. Analysis 
of the principles underlying the 
functions of auditing within a 
firm. Will impart a working 
knowledge of techniques used in 
business audits. 



A 650 Advanced Accounting 
Theory 

Prerequisite: six hours of in- 
termediate accounting. Theoret- 
ical aspects of accepted account- 
ing principles and their 
significance as a frame of refer- 
ence for the valuation of ac- 
counting practices. Major focus 
on the role of regulatory agen- 
cies and professional accounting 
organizations with regard to 
their influences on accounting 
theory and practice. 

A 651 Financial Accounting 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 650. An exam- 
ination and evaluation of current 
literature in external accounting 
issues and related fields. 



A 652 Advanced Auditing 

Prerequisite: three hours of 
auditing. An analysis of the con- 
temporary problems surround- 
ing the attest function per- 
formed by the professional 
independent auditor. EDP audit- 
ing is examined in depth. 

A 653 Accounting for the 
Not-for-Profit Organization 

Prerequisite: six hours of in- 
termediate accounting. An in- 
tensive examination of the con- 
temporary views toward 
financial reporting for not-for- 
profit organizations. 



A 654 Financial Statements: 
Reporting and Analysis 

Prerequisite: A 621. Tech- 
niques in analyzing financial 
statements by creditors and eq- 
uity investors for the short and 
long term. Review of accounting 
principles as reflected in the fi- 
nancial statements. 



A 661 Managerial Accounting 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: A 621. Case 
course covering advanced issues 
of management accounting. 
Develops topics introduced in A 
621. 



A 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the stu- 
dents and instructor. Course 
may be taken more than once. 

A 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours or permission of the in- 
structor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 
viser. 



A 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 



A 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 



A 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual 
student's progress in the prepa- 
ration of a thesis. 



Civil and 

Environmental 

Engineering 

CE 601 Water Treatment 

Advanced design principles 
and practices in water treatment 
processes; study of unit process- 
es and operations; water treat- 
ment plant design ; methods of 
population projection; water dis- 
tribution systems. 



CE 602 Wastewater Treatment 

Advanced design principles 
and practices in sewage treat- 
ment processes; study of unit 
processes and operations; sec- 
ondary sewage treatment plant 
design; sludge handling and dis- 
posal; sewage collection sys- 
tems; introduction to advanced 
treatment methods. 



CE 605 Solid Waste 
Management 

Characteristics, volumes, col- 
lection and disposal of solid 
waste and refuse. Design of pro- 
cessing, recycling and recovery 
equipment; landfill design and 
operation; resource recovery; 
incineration. 

CE 606 Environmental Law and 
Legislation 

Review and techniques of en- 
forcement of state and federal 
pollution control laws and regu- 
lations; effects on waste treat- 
ment criteria and design and 
evaluation of municipal ordi- 
nances; preparation of environ- 
mental assessments and impact 
statements. 



A 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



96 



CE 607 Water Pollution Control 
Processes 

Prerequisite: CH 601. This 
course is open to non-engineering 
students only. Study of physical, 
chemical and biological process- 
es employed for pollution con- 
trol. Processes cover the removal 
of suspended, colloidal and dis- 
solved phases of pollution. 

CE 612 Advanced Wastewater 
Treatment 

Prerequisites: CH 601, which 
may be taken concurrently; CE 
602. Theories and principles of 
advanced sewage treatment 
including nutrient removal, 
demineralization, distillation, 
ozonization, carbon filtration, 
ion exchange, nitrification; de- 
sign of facilities; upgrading sec- 
ondary plants. 

CE 613 Industrial Wastewater 
Control 

Prerequisites: CH 601, CE 602. 
Characteristics of industrial 
wastes — volumes, sources, 

types; methods of volume reduc- 
tion, waste segregation, recovery, 
recycling and waste treatment. 

CE 614 Surface Water Quality 
Management 

Prerequisites: CE 602 and CE 
623, or permission of instructor. 
Characteristics of rivers and 
streams, including hydrology, re- 
sponse to waste load inputs and 
engineering controls. Waste load 
allocation principles. Physical 
and hydrologic characteristics of 
lakes. The response of lakes to 
wastewater discharges. 

Characteristics of estuaries. 
Dispersion of contaminants in 
estuaries, bays and harbors. 
Modeling of dissolved oxygen in 
surface waters. Study of eutroph- 
ication and the distribution of in- 
dicator bacteria, pathogens, 
viruses, toxic substances and 
temperature in surface waters. 



CE 616 Groundwater Waste 
Disposal 

Study of effects of disposal of 
wastewaters in groundwaters; 
travel of pollutants through soil; 
removal of nutrients and pollu- 
tants by soil interactions; leach- 
ate identification and control 
from refuse disposal areas. 

CE 620 Engineering Hydrology 

Prerequisites: undergraduate 
course in hydraulics; computer lit- 
eracy. Theory, methods and appli- 
cations of hydrology to con- 
temporary engineering problems. 
Methods of data collection and 
analysis as well as design proce- 
dures are presented for typical en- 
gineering problems. Specific top- 
ics to be considered within this 
framework include the 

rainfall/runoff process, hydro- 
graph analysis, hydrologic rout- 
ing, urban runoff, storm water 
models and flood frequency anal- 
ysis. 

CE 621 Advanced Hydrology 

Prerequisite: CE 620. Examina- 
tion of water sources and losses; 
the evaporation and infiltration 
processes and their effects on 
stream flow hydrographs. Deter- 
ministic and stochastic methods 
of reservoir analysis and design 
for purposes of flood protection 
and water conservation will be 
investigated, as well as problems 
in urban hydrology. 

CE 623 Open Channel 
Hydraulics 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in hydraulics. Basic theo- 
ries of open channel flow will be 
presented and corresponding 
equations developed. Methods of 
calculating uniform /steady flow; 
gradually varied flow; and rapid, 
spatially varied, unsteady flow 
will be investigated. Flow 
through bridge piers, transitions 
and culverts will be analyzed as 
well as backwater curves and the 
design of open channels. 



CE 624 Computer Applications 
in Hydrology/Hydraulics 

Prerequisite: CE 620 and CE 
623. Investigation of vddely used 
computer software in the areas of 
hydrology and hydraulics. The 
theory underlying the programs 
as well as application and evalua- 
tion of software will be stressed. 

CE 627 Groundwater Hydrology 

Prerequisite: CE 620. Investi- 
gation of a broad range of topics 
in hydrogeology including the 
hydrologic cycle, storage and spe- 
cific yield, hydraulic head and 
gradient, aquifer test procedures, 
water quality characterization, 
plume configuration and delin- 
eation, solute transport and 
groundwater modeling. 

CE 630 Reinforced Concrete 
Design 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in concrete design and 
construction. Advanced topics 
including deep beams, slabs, 
composite beams, beam 
columns, stability, connections, 
creep and deflection control. 

CE 631 Structural Steel Design 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in steel design and con- 
struction. Advanced topics relat- 
ed to the behavior and design of 
rigid frames (single and multi- 
story), plate girders and connec- 
tions. Plastic method of analysis 
and design. 

CE 632 Load and Resistance 
Factor Design for Structural 
Steel 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in steel design and con- 
struction. Load and resistance 
factor design for steel buildings. 
Beams, axially loaded members 
and connections. 



Courses 97 



CE 633 Wood Engineering 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in wood engineering. 
Wood properties and determina- 
tion of allowable stresses. 
Laminated, built-up and com- 
posite sections. Wood framing 
systems and connections to resist 
gravity and lateral loads. 

CE 634 Prestressed Concrete 
Design 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in concrete design and 
construction. Analysis and de- 
sign of pretensioned and post- 
tensioned concrete structures. 
Beams, columns, connections, 
partial prestressing, deflections, 
anchorage. 

CE 640 Structural Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in indeterminate struc- 
tures. Analysis of structures hav- 
ing members with variable cross 
sections, secondary stresses, 
shear walls and semirigid con- 
nections. Influence lines for stati- 
cally indeterminate structures. 

CE 650 Soil Mechanics I 

Prerequisites: undergraduate 
course in soil mechanics; com- 
puter literacy. The first course in 
a series of courses dealing with 
soil mechanics and foundation 
engineering which will give the 
student a better understanding 
of the basic principles of geome- 
chanics. Includes: the nature of 
soil; soil formation; phase rela- 
tionships and classification; 
stress, strain and strength analy- 
sis; flow analysis; and consolida- 
tion theory. 



CE 651 Soil Mechanics II 

Prerequisite: CE 650. Second 
course in the soil mechanics se- 
ries. Includes: consolidation the- 
ory, settlement analysis, soil 
modification, compaction, lateral 
earth pressure, slope stability 
and soil exploration. 

CE 652 Foundation Engineering I 

Prerequisite: CE 651. The first 
of two courses in foundation en- 
gineering. Deals primarily with 
shallow foundations. Includes: 
types of foundations, site explo- 
ration, shear strength, bearing ca- 
pacity, limit states, settlement, al- 
lowable pressure, and rafts and 
mats. 



CE 653 Foundation Engineering O 

Prerequisite: CE 652. Second 
course in foundation engineer- 
ing. Deals primarily with deep 
foundations. Topics include pile 
foundations, pile types, pile driv- 
ing, load testing, design of indi- 
vidual piles, group action, 
drilled pier foundations, con- 
struction methods and capacity 
in sand and clay. 

CE 660 Project Planning 

Application of network analo- 
gy to project planning and 
scheduling; resource, time and fi- 
nancial management. Computer 
applications will be included. 

CE 670 Selected Topics 

A study of related topics of 
particular interest to students 
and instructor. Course may be 
taken more than once. 



CE 678 Computer Applications 
in Civil Engineering 

Prerequisite: introductory 
course in computer fundamen- 
tals. The design and analysis of 
software and hardware systems 
for the solution of civil engineer- 
ing problems. Includes: software 
engineering, software coding, 
evaluation of hardware and soft- 



CE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate 
hours or permission of the de- 
partment chair and program co- 
ordinator. Independent study 
under the guidance of an adviser 
into an area of mutual interest, 
each study terminating in a tech- 
nical report of academic merit. 
Research may be in such envi- 
ronmental areas as water re- 
sources, stream pollution, solid 
waste management or air pollu- 
tion. 



CE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of 
program coordinator. Inde- 
pendent study under the guid- 
ance of an adviser into an area 
designated by the program coor- 
dinator. 



CE 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 

CE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



CE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



98 



Chemistry 



CH 601 Environmental 
Chemistry 

Areas of consideration: the 
sources, reactions, transport, ef- 
fects and fates of chemical 
species in the water, soil and air 
environments, as well as the in- 
fluence of human activities upon 
these processes. 

CH 602 Environmental 
Chemical Analysis 

Prerequisite: CH 601 or equiv- 
alent. Theory and laboratory 
training in the applications of in- 
strumental methods in the anal- 
ysis of environmental samples. 
Topics include sampling tech- 
niques; chromatography, ultra- 
violet-visible, infrared and atomic 
absorption spectroscopy; mass 
spectrometry; nuclear magnetic 
resonance spectrometry; bio- 
chemical methods and use of ra- 
dioisotopes. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 

CH 611 Special Topics in 
Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Advanced course dealing with 
topics such as stereochemistry, 
photochemistry, natural products 
and mechanisms of organic reac- 
tions. 



CH 621 Chemical Forensic 
Analysis with Laboratory 

Advanced techniques and new 
developments in the identification 
of various materials such as pig- 
ments, dyestuffs, food additives, 
pharmaceutical preparations, 
polymers, synthetic fibers and in- 
organic material products. 
Laboratory fee required. 4 credit 
hours. 



CH 625 Chemistry of Fires and 
Explosions 

An examination of the basic or- 
ganic chemistry and combustion 
and explosive properties of 
flammable materials. The chemi- 
cal principles underlying fires and 
explosions. Chemical properties 
of various synthetic materials and 
the products of their combustion. 
Fire retardant materials and 
chemicals used in fire extinguish- 
ment. 

CH 631 Advances in Analytic 
Chemistry 

Provides background for the 
recent advances made in instru- 
mentation and current analytic 
techniques. 

CH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken more 
than once. 



CH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. 

CH 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 

CH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 
credits of graduate work. 
Periodic meetings and discus- 
sion of the individual student's 
progress in the preparation of a 
thesis. 



CH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Criminal Justice 

CJ 601 Seminar in Interpersonal 
Relations 

Interpersonal communication 
in teaching, supervision and in 
various work relationships. The 
criminal justice worker as a re- 
source person and facilitator of 
others is stressed. Humanistic 
psychology and interpersonal 
psychology provide the theoreti- 
cal base. 



CJ 605 Social Deviance 

A survey of theories relating 
to the scope and nature of the 
crime problem. Consideration of 
the problems of deviancy includ- 
ing social norms deviancy, men- 
tal disturbances, juvenile crime 
and the various possible and ac- 
tual responses to deviancy. 
Various approaches to the prob- 
lem of rehabilitation. 



CJ 608 Law and Evidence 

Comprehensive analysis of the 
rules of evidence. Includes: judicial 
notice, presumptions, the nature of 
real and circumstantial evidence, 
hearsay evidence, confessions and 
admissions, and witnesses. Empha- 
sis on evidence in criminal cases. 



CJ 610 Administration of Justice 

A study of all the steps of the 
criminal justice system from the 
time the accused is arrested until 
sentencing to a correctional facili- 
ty. The objective will be to review 
all the problems which arise dur- 
ing this process and to consider 
some possible solutions which 
will benetit the individual being 
processed without subverting the 
purposes of the process. 



Courses 99 



CJ 612 Criminal Justice 
Management 

The development of the theory 
and practice of criminal justice 
management in the United States. 
Significant developments and 
ideas of those who have made 
major contributions to American 
criminal justice management. 

CJ 614 Survey of Forensic 
Science 

An introductory survey of 
forensic sciences and criminalis- 
tics, crime scene procedures and 
documentation, and methods of 
laboratory analysis for students 
specializing in security and in- 
vestigation. 



CJ 624 Group Process in 
Criminal Justice 

Small group interaction; both 
theoretical and experimental 
facets of group process are pre- 
sented. Group counseling and 
encounter groups. 

CJ 632 Advanced Investigation I 

An in-depth study of modem 
principles and techniques of 
criminal and civil investigations. 
Management of investigations, 
use of vi^itnesses, interviewing, 
polygraph, backgrounds estab- 
lishment of MO, missing per- 
sons, surveillance and investiga- 
tion of questioned deaths and 
death scenes. 



CJ 640 Advanced 
Criminalistics II 

Introduction of advanced mi- 
croscopic, chemical and instru- 
mental methods with extensive 
"hands-on" experience provided 
by a laboratory section. Prin- 
ciples and methods of analysis of 
microscopic and macroscopic ev- 
idence such as glass, soil, papers, 
inks, dyes, paints, varnishes, ex- 
plosives, fibers, drugs and other 
potential physical traces will be 
discussed in class. 

CJ 641 Advanced 
Criminalistics II Laboratory 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 



CJ 616 Advanced Crime Scene 
Investigation 

An in-depth study of crime 
scene procedures including 
recognition, protection, docu- 
mentation; and collection of 
physical evidence; scene docu- 
mentation; scene search proce- 
dures; and reconstructions from 
evidence and scene patterns. 

CJ 620 Advanced Criminalistics I 

The comparison and individ- 
ualization of physical evidence 
by biological and chemical prop- 
erties is presented in lectures and 
carried out in the laboratory. The 
theories and practice of micro- 
scopic, biological, immun- 
ological and chemical analysis 
are applied to the examination of 
blood, saliva, seminal fluid, hair, 
tissues, botanical evidence and 
other material of forensic 
interest. 



CJ 621 Advanced Criminalistics I 
Laboratory 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 



CJ 633 Advanced Investigation II 

An in-depth study of the prin- 
ciples and techniques of criminal 
and civil investigations. Investi- 
gation of fraud, embezzlement, 
white-collar crime, property 
crimes, sexual assaults and other 
crimes against persons; extor- 
tion; kidnapping; drug trades; 
and traffic accidents. 



CJ 637 Contemporary Issues in 
Criminal Justice 

Topics selected by students 
relating to current issues and 
concerns in the field of criminal 
justice. Each student will be re- 
quired to write a paper and 
deliver an oral presentation on a 
selected topic. 



CJ 649 Fire Scene Investigation 
and Arson Analysis 

The techniques of crime scene 
documentation and investigation 
as they relate to fire and explo- 
sion scenes. Evidence recog- 
nition and collection. Laboratory 
analysis of fire scene, arson ac- 
celerant and explosion scene 
residues. Scientific proof of 
arson. Laboratory fee required. 4 
credit hours. 



CJ 651 Problems in the 
Administration of Justice 

A study of the interaction be- 
tween the law enforcement offi- 
cial and the accused beginning 
with detention and /or arrest, 
during which time the official is 
seeking to secure incriminating 
evidence effectively while still 
protecting the Fourth, Fifth and 
Sixth Amendment constitutional 
rights of the "presumed inno- 
cent" accused. 



100 



CJ 653 Physical Analysis in 
Forensic Science 

The classic firearms examina- 
tion, classification and compari- 
son of bullets and cartridges, tool- 
marks comparison and striation 
analysis, serial number restora- 
tion, document examination, 
voiceprint identification, finger- 
prints and polygraphy examina- 
tion. 



CJ 654 Physical Analysis in 
Forensic Science Laboratory 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CJ 660 Forensic Microscopy 

Basic techniques of optical 
microscopy and the develop- 
ment of operational skills for the 
use of the microscope as a tool of 
evidence detection and evalua- 
tion. Microscopical measure- 
ments and analytic methods will 
be covered. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 4 credit hours. 

CJ 661 Medicolegal 
Investigation and Identification 

An introduction to proce- 
dures and techniques for medi- 
colegal investigation of ques- 
tioned death and identification 
of deceased persons, including 
autopsy technique, odontologi- 
cal procedures and anthropologi- 
cal approaches. 

CJ 662 Forensic Toxicology 

An in-depth analysis of foren- 
sic toxicological procedures and 
methods; determinations of 
metallic, volatile and soluble 
poisons; analysis for narcotic 
drugs and other drugs of abuse 
and dosage-form drugs that are 
commonly abused or found con- 
tributing to cause of death. 
Laboratory fee required. 4 credit 
hours. 



CJ 663 Advanced Forensic 
Serology I 

A comprehensive study of the 
theory and practice of isoen- 
zyme, serum protein and im- 
munoglobulin genetic markers 
in human blood and body fluids. 
Electrophoretic and isoelectric 
focusing techniques. Inter- 
pretation of genetic marker re- 
sults in blood individualization. 
Laboratory fee required. 4 credit 
hours. 



CJ 664 Advanced Forensic 
Serology II 

A comprehensive study of the 
theory and practice of biochemi- 
cal and immunologic procedures 
for blood and body fluid identifi- 
cation; typing of Rh, MNSs and 
other red cell antigens in blood 
and blood stains; antiserum se- 
lection and evaluation; ELISA 
techniques; DNA polymorphism 
analysis. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 4 credit hours. 

CJ 667 Fire and Building Codes, 
Standards and Practices 

The study of building and fire 
codes and regulations as they re- 
late to the prevention and inci- 
dence of structural fires. Con- 
temporary building and fire 
codes and practices and their en- 
forcement. Model building 
codes. Fire prevention and con- 
trol through building design. 
(See also FS 667.) 

CJ 668 Fire and Casualty 
Insurance Practices 

A study of financial risk and 
decision making from the inves- 
tigative point of view. Insurance 
rate making and relation to risk 
and other factors. Insurance ad- 
justment and economic factors 
that must be considered in fire 
and accident investigations. (See 
also FS 668.) 



CJ 669 Dynamics, Evaluation and 
Prevention of Structural Fires 

A detailed analysis of the evo- 
lution of modern structures and 
the mechanical systems neces- 
sary to provide safety and com- 
fort. The effect of the nature of 
structures and their mechanical 
systems on fire behavior. Struc- 
tural bases and mechanical sys- 
tems for fire protection and fire 
prevention. 

CJ 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



CJ 673 Biomedical Methods in 
Forensic Science 

Methods and application of 
modem toxicology, biochemistry, 
pathology, dentistry and 
medicine in forensic science. 



CJ 674 Biomedical Methods in 
Forensic Science Laboratory 

1 credit hour. Laboratory fee 
required. 

CJ 675 Private Security Law 

A review and examination of 
currently applicable federal and 
state administrative, civil, crimi- 
nal and constitutional laws as 
they relate to the private security 
industry. The framework of the 
course will include sources of au- 
thority and common law. 

CJ 676 Security Management 
Seminar 

Current problems, concerns, 
issues and legislation affecting 
the private security industry as 
they relate to and are of interest 
to the students and instructor. 



Courses 101 



CJ 677 Private Security in 
Modem Society 

An introduction to current 
thinking and problems relating 
to the private security industry. 
The course will examine such is- 
sues as historical growth, role, 
mission and future of the indus- 
try. Other topics will include pro- 
fessionalization and ethics in the 
private security field. 

CJ 684 Fire/Accident Scene 
Reconstruction 

Application of principles of 
reconstruction of the scene of a 
fire or accident, including proper 
procedure for examining physi- 
cal evidence to determine cause. 
Emphasis on preparation of re- 
ports, testimony for hearings and 
trials, rendering of advisory 
opinions to assist in resolution of 
disputes affecting life and prop- 
erty. 

CJ 690 Research Project I 

Individual guidance on a re- 
search endea\'or. 1-3 credits. 



CJ 691 Research Project II 

Prerequisite: CJ 690. 1-3 credits. 

CJ 693 Criminal Justice 
Internship I 

The student's formal educa- 
tional development will be com- 
plemented by field placement 
experience in various criminal 
justice settings or agencies. Field 
experience will be supervised by 
designated agency and depart- 
mental personnel. Students in 
the forensic science program 
using this course to fulfill the re- 
search component requirement 
of the core program are required 
to do an internship research pro- 
ject and must complete a fully 
developed work product consist- 
ing of background, methods, 
data and discussion. 



CJ 694 Criminal Justice 
Internship II 

Prerequisite: CJ 693. 

CJ 695 Independent Study 

A directed independent learn- 
ing experience, the topic and for- 
mat to be agreed upon by the 
student and supervising faculty. 
1-3 credits. 



CJ 697 Thesis I 

Prerequisite; 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress toward the com- 
pletion of the thesis. 



CJ 698 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



CJ 699 Thesis III 

A continuation of Thesis II. 



Communication 

CO 601 Basics of Business 
Media Production Techniques 

A survey of the implementa- 
tion of various media in the pro- 
duction of instructional and pro- 
motional materials specifically for 
the small and medium business 
and corporate media depart- 
ments. Emphasizes both theoreti- 
cal and practical problems of 
audio and visual systems avail- 
able to the business situation, 
paying particular attention to the 
vocabulary and skills which 
make it possible to transfer an 
idea from the board room to an 
effective media presentation. 
Laboratory fee required. 

CO 609 Scripting the Media 
Presentation 

Instruction on how to select 
the medium appropriate to the 
message, write a treatment, de- 
velop a story board, script the 
message and use proper format. 



CO 621 Managerial 
Communication 

Major emphasis on the role of 
communication in a democracy 
and the effects of communication 
content. Brief treatment of con- 
tent analysis techniques, person- 
to-person communication and 
barriers to the flow of communi- 
cation. 

CO 631 Public Information 
Dynamics 

How the executive can best 
present the organization in an ac- 
curate and favorable light to the 
news media. Training techniques 
for the public relations person 
who will work with executives 
giving corporate messages inter- 
nally and press statements exter- 
nally. 

CO 632 Contemporary Public 
Relations Issues 

Using the case-study ap- 
proach, concentrates on the 
problems facing management 
and public relations executives 
in businesses and other institu- 
tions. The problems change from 
year to year, in tune with devel- 
opments in society. 

CO 640 Communications 
Technologies 

An in-depth examination for 
nontechnical students of tech- 
nologies used with visual, voice 
data and character information 
for communicating at a distance, 
for storing and subsequently re- 
trieving information and for pro- 
cessing information to improve 
communication efficiency. 



102 



CO 641 Competition and 
Regulation in 
Telecommunications 

A study of proceedings before 
state public utility commissions 
and the Federal Communi- 
cations Commission delineating 
the boundaries between those ac- 
tivities in the telecommunica- 
tions field subject to regulation, 
those open to competition with 
restrictions and those cleared to 
be fully competitive. The course 
will include discussion and anal- 
ysis of contemporary legal pro- 
ceedings affecting this topic. 

CO 642 Management of 

Telecommunications 

Organizations 

A study and comparison of 
managerial systems and prac- 
tices in users, manufacturers, 
distributors and common carri- 
ers of telecommunications facili- 
ties. Identification of criteria nec- 
essary for developing and 
maintaining effective telecom- 
munications organizations. Case 
problems will relate largely to 
specific instances from this field. 

CO 643 Telecommunications 
Policy and Strategy 

Examination of management 
policies and strategies for the 
complex telecommunications or- 
ganization operating in a dy- 
namic environment, from the 
viewpoint of the top-level execu- 
tives of the organization. 
Development of analytic frame- 
works for the management of 
numerous elements involved in 
assuring the fulfillment of the 
goals of the total organization. 
Integration of the student's gen- 
eral business knowledge with 
the content of required courses in 
the M.B.A. program. Emphasis is 
placed on the examination and 
discussion of cases drawn large- 
ly from the telecommunication 
industry. 



CO 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of 
adviser. An in-depth examina- 
tion of a topic in the field of com- 
munication which reflects the 
special research of a faculty 
member or the special interest of 
a group of students. May be 
taken more than once. 



CO 693 Internship 

A program of field experience 
set up by the student and ap- 
proved by the program adviser 
under the tutelage of a profes- 
sional in the field. 

CO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study or research in com- 
munication under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

CO 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study 1. 

CO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings with 
the adviser for discussion of the 
individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

CO 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Computer Science 

CS 602 Computing 
Fundamentals 

An introduction to computers, 
computing and computer science, 
including consideration of basic 
concepts and technology, devel- 
opment of automatic computa- 
tion, computer applications, orga- 
nization of hardware and 
software systems, algorithms, 
flowcharts, elementary program- 
ming, number systems, survey of 
programming languages. This 
course may not be taken for credit by 
students having 9 or more credits in 
computer science. 

CS 603 Pascal Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or pro- 
gramming experience. A first 
course in the programming lan- 
guage Pascal. It will cover all 
major aspects of that language. 
Several common algorithms will 
be taught as part of the process of 
learning the language. Students 
will be expected to design, code 
and run several Pascal programs. 



CS 604 APL Programming 

Introduction to the APL pro- 
gramming language and pro- 
gramming environment, includ- 
ing interactive coding and 
execution. Covers the many oper- 
ators unique to the APL lan- 
guage, language syntax, array 
data objects and operations on 
them, function types and uses, re- 
cursive application of functions, 
common language idioms. 
Students will complete a number 
of APL programming projects. 



Courses 103 



CS 605 COBOL Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or pro- 
gramming experience. A first 
course in the business-oriented 
programming language COBOL. 
It will cover most major aspects 
of that language. Several com- 
mon algorithms will be taught as 
part of the process of learning 
the language. Students will be 
expected to design, code and run 
several COBOL programs. 



CS 607 LISP Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or pro- 
gramming experience. Introduces 
students to the language LISP, 
which is often used in artificial 
intelligence. Covers all major as- 
pects of that language. Several 
common algorithms will be 
taught as part of the process of 
learning LISP. Students will be 
expected to design, code and run 
several LISP programs. 



CS 619 Legal Protection of 
Computer Software 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or equiv- 
alent. The legal principles in- 
volved in the protection of pro- 
prietary computer software and 
hardware by means of patents, 
copyrights and trade secrets. 
Software licensing and employ- 
er-employee relationships in- 
volving creative work. (See also 
PS 619.) 



CS 605B Advanced Business 
Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 605. Ad- 
vanced programming in the 
COBOL language, including file 
organization and selected algo- 
rithms within an applied busi- 
ness systems context. 

CS 606 FORTRAN 
Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or pro- 
gramming experience. A first 
course in the scientifically orient- 
ed programming language FOR- 
TRAN. It will cover all major as- 
pects of that language. Several 
common algorithms will be 
taught as part of the process of 
learning the language. Students 
will be expected to design, code 
and run several FORTRAN pro- 
grams. 

CS 606B Advanced Technical 
Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 606 and ei- 
ther M 610 or permission of the 
instructor. Advanced program- 
ming in the FORTRAN lan- 
guage, including selected algo- 
rithms in a scientific and 
technical context. 



CS 610 C Language 
Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 603 or CS 
606. Intermediate-level course 
covering all major aspects of the 
programming language C. 
Several common algorithms 
studied as part of the process of 
learning the language. Students 
will be expected to design, code 
and run several C programs. 

CS 612 Ada Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 620 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. Advanced, 
modern programming method- 
ologies using the programming 
language Ada. Covers many as- 
pects of the language, including: 
type declarations, subprograms, 
overloading operators, exception 
handling, compUation units, pack- 
ages and generic program units. 
The study of several common al- 
gorithms. Students wdll be expect- 
ed to design, code and run several 
applications which will incorpo- 
rate some of the unique features 
of the Ada language. 

CS 616 Assembly Language 

Prerequisite: Any one of CS 603 
through CS 610. Introduction to as- 
sembly language programming, 
including study of instruction 
types and operation, assembly lan- 
guage syntax and features, explicit 
use of memory, macros, subpro- 
grams, interrupts, I/O conver- 
sions. Major functional characteris- 
tics of the computer and its 
peripherals will be studied. 



CS 620 Data Structures 

Prerequisite: CS 603. An ex- 
amination of data structures, 
their function and uses. Topics 
will include basic data represen- 
tations, arrays, stacks, queues, 
linked lists, trees, graphs, and 
hashing. Study of the relation be- 
tween data structures and algo- 
rithms, such as sorting and 
searching, including elementary 
computational complexity analy- 
sis. This course serves to cover 
advanced programming in 
Pascal and requires students to 
develop and run a number of 
programs. 

CS 621 Applied Algorithms 

Prerequisite: CS 620 or equiv- 
alent. Important algorithms usu- 
ally omitted in earlier courses. 
Topics to be selected at the in- 
structor's discretion from, but 
not limited to, the following: 
measuring performance of algo- 
rithms; external (polyphase) 
sorting; string searching (Boyer- 
Moore); partial match retrieval; 
range searching; quad- and oct- 
trees; fast Fourier transform; 
generating random permuta- 
tions; merging, splitting and 
finding the k-th member of or- 
dered lists; data encryption; and 
data compression. 



104 



CS 622 Database Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 620. A survey 
of database systems, their pur- 
pose, structure, function and use. 
Topics will include an overview 
of DB systems, major DB models, 
design and implementation 
methods in DB models, introduc- 
tion to typical DB systems and 
internal operation of DB systems. 

CS 622B Advanced Database 
Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 622. A second 
course in database systems cov- 
ering advanced topics, fourth- 
generation languages and new 
developments in the database 
field. Topics include: database 
design methodologies and eval- 
uation, concurrency control, re- 
covery schemes, security, query 
processing, fourth-generation 
languages, decision support sys- 
tems and new developments. 

CS 624 Software Engineering 

Prerequisite: CS 620. For the 
experienced computing student 
involved with software system 
management, design and pro- 
gramming. Includes: analysis of 
complexity, efficiency and im- 
provement of code, strategies for 
large programming projects, sys- 
tematic design methods, testing 
and debugging the human-ma- 
chine interface. 



CS 630 Computing Theory 

Introduction to the theory of 
computers and computation in- 
cluding study of formal systems 
and methods; regular expressions, 
formal languages and grammars, 
elements of parsing theory, and 
the Chomsky hierarchy; finite au- 
tomata and pushdown automata; 
decidability; Turing machines. 
Post machines and other formal 
computer models; and elements of 
complexity theory. 



CS 632 Theory of Algorithms 

Prerequisite: CS 620; recom- 
mended is M 615. Study of the 
theory of algorithms, emphasiz- 
ing their nature, structure, capa- 
bilities and limitations. Con- 
sideration of general strategies of 
design and analysis of algorithms, 
including structured methods, 
correctness and complexity. 
Specific algorithmic strategies, 
such as combinatorial exhaus- 
tion, backtracing and branch- 
and-bound. Recursive function 
theory. Application of abstract 
models of computing to algo- 
rithms, including such topics as 
Turing machines, P- and NP- 
Completeness. 

CS 636 Structure of 
Programming Languages 

Prerequisites: CS 603 and 
knowledge of another high-level 
computer language. The struc- 
ture, syntax and semantic as- 
pects of computer languages will 
be studied. Programs will be 
written in the FORTH language. 

CS 638 Compiler Design 

Prerequisites: CS 616, CS 620, 
CS 630. Study of the function, 
structure and design of language 
translators, including assemblers, 
macroprocessors, compilers and 
interpreters. Topics include lexi- 
cal and syntax analysis, symbol 
tables, memory management, re- 
location, linking, loading, error 
handling, fundamentals of code 
optimization and generation. 



CS 640 Computer Organization 

Prerequisites: CS 616, CS 620. 
An examination of the architec- 
ture and functional characteris- 
tics of modem digital computers, 
of conventional as well as state- 
of-the-art organization. While 
not a design course, it will pro- 
vide the experienced computing 
student with detailed informa- 
tion needed for full understand- 
ing of issues arising in many 
areas of computer science work. 
Topics include functional aspects 
of a processor, machine lan- 
guage, microprogramming, in- 
terrupt systems, peripherals and 
I/O control, memory structure, 
parallel and pipelined architec- 
ture, supercomputers, and non- 
Von Neumann machines. 



CS 642 Computer Networks and 
Data Communication 

Prerequisites: CS 603, CS 616, 
M 610. Examines types, methods 
and uses of computer network- 
ing and data communication. 
System structure, components, 
software and performance. 
Related topic of distributed pro- 
cessing also studied. 

CS 644 Operating Systems 

Prerequisites: CS 616, CS 620. 
Study of the function, structure 
and design of computer operat- 
ing systems, principally multi- 
programming systems. Topics in- 
clude management of processes 
and processor resources, of data 
and memory and of peripheral 
devices; concurrent processes; 
system protection; scheduling; 
paging and virtual systems. 



Courses 105 



CS 644B Advanced Operaring 
Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 644. A second 
course in operating systems and 
system architecture covering ad- 
vanced topics, and new hard- 
ware/software developments. 
Includes: interprocess communi- 
cation, design issues, special- 
purpose and multiprocessor op- 
erating systems, concurrency 
and access control, user inter- 
faces, I/O devices and manage- 
ment, parallel architecture, fault 
tolerance and new develop- 
ments. 



CS 646 Data Parallel 
Programming 

Prerequisite: CS 640 or equiv- 
alent. The programming tech- 
niques and algorithms used to 
program massively parallel com- 
puters containing possibly thou- 
sands of processors. Topics: 
hardware structures for parallel 
computing, detecting vector par- 
allelism in sequential programs, 
measuring the efficiency of par- 
allel algorithms, algorithms that 
benefit from data parallelism, 
converting algorithms to benefit 
from data parallelism, program- 
ming with implicit parallelism 
and explicit parallelism. 

CS 648 Computer Systems 
Analysis and Selection 

Prerequisites: one of CS 605B, 
CS 606 B, CS 610, CS 620. Recom- 
mended, but not required, are CS 
616, CS 640, and CS 642. Study of 
performance evaluation and se- 
lection of computer hardware and 
software systems. Consideration 
of requirements determination, 
computer structure and capability, 
performance testing techniques, 
decision and planning methods. 



CS 650 Computer Graphics 

Prerequisites: CS 620, M 610. 
The mathematical foundations 
for computer graphics and intro- 
duction to the current state of the 
art of graphics programming. 
Includes: 2-D and 3-D viewing, 
geometric transformations, clip- 
ping, segmentation, user interac- 
tion, curves, surfaces, modeling 
and object hierarchy. 

CS 650B Advanced Computer 
Graphics 

Prerequisite: CS 650. A second 
course in computer graphics cov- 
ering advanced concepts such as 
perspective depth, hidden-sur- 
face elimination, surface fitting 
and surface displaying, light, 
color, shading, fractals, and geo- 
metric models and object hierar- 
chy. 

CS 660 Artificial Intelligence 

Prerequisite: CS 607. A study 
of the fundamental goals and 
methods of artificial intelligence, 
the field using computers to 
realize apparent intelligent be- 
havior. Includes: the design and 
implementation of artificial intel- 
ligence programs using the LISP 
language. 

CS 662 Expert Systems 

Prerequisite: CS 607. Prin- 
ciples of expert systems, artificial 
intelligence programs that em- 
body knowledge of some area of 
human expertise and that can in- 
teract with an unskilled user to 
provide a cost-effective expert 
consultant. Examines application 
of expert systems in practice and 
how to create such systems. 
Students will design and imple- 
ment expert systems. 



CS 664 Neural Networks 

Prerequisites: CS 603 and ei- 
ther CS 620 or permission of the 
instructor. Examines various 
connection topologies between 
the many, simple parallel pro- 
cessing elements of neural net- 
works; the learning algorithms 
which train the networks; and 
the computational capabilities of 
these various configurations. 
Independent literature research, 
class presentations and software 
simulations of neural networks 
required. 

CS 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: CS 620 or per- 
mission of the instructor. An ex- 
amination of new developments 
or current practices in computer 
and information science. A topic 
will be selected for thorough 
study. Possible subject areas in- 
clude data structures, recent 
hardware or software advances 
and specialized applications. 
Content may vary from trimester 
to trimester. 

CS 690 Project 

Prerequisite: 15 credit hours 
and permission of the program 
coordinator. Completion of a sig- 
nificant project under the guid- 
ance of an adviser in an area of 
mutual interest, such study ter- 
minating in a technical report of 
academic merit. For example, the 
project may be a survey of a tech- 
nical area in computer science or 
may involve the solution of an 
actual or hypothetical technical 
problem. 



CS 695 Independent Study 1 

Prerequisite: permission of 
the program coordinator. 
Independent study under the 
guidance of an adviser in an area 
designated by the program coor- 
dinator in consultation with the 
student. 



106 



CS 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 

CS 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussion of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



EC 603 Microeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
principles of economics or EC 
600. Topics in resource allocation 
and price determination. Theo- 
ries of choice of consumers, 
firms, resource owners under 
monopoly, monopsony, competi- 
tion and alternative market 
forms. 



EC 627 Economics of Labor 
Relations 

A survey of labor economics 
and the economics of labor rela- 
tions using both the tools of eco- 
nomic analysis and institutional 
analysis. The emphasis is on the 
application of economics to labor 
problems and labor-manage- 
ment relations. 



CS 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



English 



E 600 English Language 
Workshop 

Enrollment in this course is 
limited to and required of stu- 
dents who are not native speak- 
ers of English and who lack ade- 
quate background in English 
instruction. Students whose 
TOEFL scores are less than 550 
and/or students who enter the 
Graduate School following com- 
pletion of an intensive English 
language program are required 
to take this course in the first 
term of enrollment. The course 
emphasizes development of con- 
versation, pronunciation and 
composition skills and includes 
orientation to the Peterson 
Library and instruction in writ- 
ing a research paper No credit. 



Economics 



EC 600 Basic Economics 

A basic theoretical foundation 
for students who lack adequate 
background in economics. An in- 
troduction to and review of basic 
economic principles. No credit. 



EC 604 Macroeconomic Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
principles of economics or EC 
600. An examination of the roles 
of consumption, investment, 
government finance and money 
influencing national income and 
output, employment, the price 
level and rate of growth. Policies 
for economic stability and 
growth. 

EC 608 Economics for Public 
Administrators 

An examination of the roles of 
consumption, investment, gov- 
ernment expenditure and money 
influencing national income, out- 
put, employment and price level, 
and growth rate. Special empha- 
sis upon the roles of fiscal and 
monetary policy and the eco- 
nomics of contemporary social 
problems. 

EC 625 Industrial Relations 

A survey of the problems, 
strategies and policies of man- 
agement and unions in conflict 
situations and in harmonizing 
labor-management relations. 
Labor legislation, collective bar- 
gaining and alternative strate- 
gies, productivity and other 
problem areas in labor-manage- 
ment relations are examined. 



EC 629 Public Policies Toward 
Business 

A survey of the economic as- 
pects of governmental and busi- 
ness relations. Emphasizes the 
concept of public control over 
certain types of business and cer- 
tain forms of business activity. 
Combination movements, pric- 
ing procedures, antitrust laws 
and agencies enforcing them, reg- 
ulation of transportation and 
public utilities, rate-making for 
transport, pricing public utility 
services, consumer protection 
and social responsibility. 

EC 633 Managerial Economics 

Prerequisite: EC 603. A study 
of the application of the major 
tools of economic analysis to the 
problems encountered by man- 
agement in the organization of 
the firm. Topics include the theo- 
ry and measurement of con- 
sumer demand, measurement 
and control of costs, the effects of 
public policy on managerial de- 
cisions and pricing techniques 
and the allocation of capital 
within the firm. 



Courses 107 



EC 641 International Economics 

A study of the basic theory 
and major institutions of interna- 
tional economic relations. 
Examines critically the tech- 
niques and background of pro- 
tectionism and free trade and the 
analysis of customs, unions and 
price and exchange rate changes. 
The theory of comparative ad- 
vantage; the gains from trade 
and the terms of trade. The bal- 
ance of payments and national 
income. Capital movements and 
economic growth. The evolution 
of the v^rorld economy and inter- 
national economic institutions. 
Effects of grovs'th on trade, and 
trade on growth. Monopolistic 
practices in international trade. 
The international monetary sys- 
tem and international monetary 
reforms. 



EC 655 Economic Problems of 
Developing Countries 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
principles of economics or EC 
600. A study of the moderniza- 
tion and economic growth in de- 
veloping countries. Topics in- 
clude: the role of government 
and planning; foreign trade, in- 
vestment and technology; re- 
source allocation; economic or- 
ganization; capital formation; 
agricultural policies; population 
growth and social changes. 

EC 665 Urban and Regional 
Economic Development 

Structure of the urban and re- 
gional economy; goals, process- 
es, problems and policy in urban 
and regional economic develop- 
ment. 



EC 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual 
student's progress in the prepa- 
ration of a thesis. 



EC 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 

EC 703 Forecasting and 
Econometrics 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 137 for 
course description. 

EC 704 Public and Private 
Policy Interfaces 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 137 for 
course description. 



EC 645 Seminar in 
Macroeconomic Policy 

Prerequisite: EC 604. The im- 
pact of fiscal and monetary poli- 
cy on employment, output and 
prices. An analysis of past and 
current economic controls and 
their impact on the economy. 

EC 653 Econometrics 

Prerequisites: EC 603-604, QA 
604, or permission of the instruc- 
tor A presentation of the impor- 
tant statistical concepts used in 
econometrics. Topics covered are 
regression theory, multiple re- 
gression, regression extensions, 
correlation, serial correlation, 
correlated regressor and error, 
the identification problem and 
selected estimating techniques. 



EC 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the stu- 
dents and instructor. May be 
taken more than once. 



EC 687 Collective Bargaining 

Prerequisite: EC 625. Emphasis 
on the negotiating process. The 
labor contract as it involves 
wages, worker security, manage- 
ment authority and handling of 
grievances arising during the life 
of the contract. 



EC 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours or permission of the in- 
structor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 
viser 



Electrical and 

Computer 

Engineering 



EE 603 Discrete and Continuous 
Systems I 

Prerequisite: computer pro- 
gramming competence. Contin- 
uous and discrete linear systems, 
system function. Z trans- 
forms, Fourier transforms, 
periodic functions, discrete 
Fourier series, fast Fourier trans- 
forms, Hilbert transforms. 
Digital processing of analog 
signals, sampling theorems. 



EC 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 



EC 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Inde- 
pendent Study 1. 



108 



EE 604 Discrete and Continuous 
Systems II 

Prerequisite: EE 603. Review 
of linear vector spaces, bases, 
Hilbert spaces. Introduction to 
the similarity transformation, di- 
agonalization of the A matrix, 
properties of similarity trans- 
formations, Jordan forms, quad- 
ratic forms, matrix norms, func- 
tions of A matrix, Caley-Harrulton 
theorem, pseudo-inverse. Math- 
ematical modeling of physical 
systems, state space representa- 
tion of dynamical systems, com- 
puter-oriented mathematical 
models. State space and linear 
systems, meaning of state, meth- 
ods of obtaining state equations. 
Stability of physical systems and 
linear systems, linearization and 
stability in the small, equivalent 
linearization and the describing 
function, stability in the large 
and the second method of 
Liapunov, exact frequency do- 
main stability criteria — Popov's 
method and its extension. 



EE 605 Computer Controlled 
Systems 

Prerequisites; EE 604 and EE 
650. Disturbance models, design, 
analog design, state space design 
methods, pole placement design 
based on input-output models, 
optimal design methods (state 
space approach), optimal design 
methods (input-output ap- 
proach), identification, adaptive 
control, implementation of digi- 
tal controllers, reduction of the 
effects of disturbances, stochastic 
models of disturbances, continu- 
ous time stochastic differential 
equation. 



EE 606 Robot Control 

Prerequisite: EE 605. Orienta- 
tion coordinate transformations, 
configuration coordinate trans- 
formations, Denavit-Hartenberg 
coordinate transformations, D-H 
matrix composition, inverse con- 
figuration kinematics, motion 
kinematics, force and torque re- 
lationships, force and moment 
translation, trajectories, coordi- 
nated motion, inverse dynamics, 
position control, feedback sys- 
tems, performance measures, 
PID control, inverse dynamic 
feedforward control, nonlinear 
control. 

EE 615 Introduction to 
Computer Logic 

Prerequisite: any one of CS 
603 through CS 610 (or equiva- 
lent). Introduction to logic ele- 
ments and to their application in 
digital networks for processing 
numerical data. The course deals 
with analysis and design tech- 
niques of combinational and se- 
quential networks and includes a 
discussion of logic variables, 
switching functions, optimal re- 
alizations, multivariable sys- 
tems. Design examples will in- 
clude logic circuits for addition, 
multiplication, counting, parity 
generation and detection. 

EE 630 Electronic 
Instrumentation I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Design of modern elec- 
tronic instrumentation. Circuit and 
system examples, evaluation and 
design techniques. Emphasis on 
practical applications including 
design theory and the circuit 
techniques used in linear inte- 
grated devices. Variety of elec- 
tronic instrumentation including 
computer interfaces, signal con- 
ditioners, waveform generators 
and shapers, filters, V/F, A/D, 
D/A converters and other spe- 
cial-purpose circuits. 



EE 631 Electronic 
Instrumentation II 

Prerequisite: EE 630. 

EE 634 Digital Signal 
Processing I 

Prerequisite: EE 603. A study 
of the theories of digital signal 
processing and their applica- 
tions. Topics include discrete 
time signals, the Z transform, the 
discrete Fourier transform, the 
EFT, homomorphic signal pro- 
cessing and applications of digi- 
tal signal processing. 

EE 635 Digital Signal 
Processing II 

Prerequisite: EE 634. 

EE 637 Power Systems 
Engineering I 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. Concepts and methods 
of analysis and design of modern 
power systems. Includes the net- 
work representation of power 
systems, matrix methods, sym- 
metrical components and the use 
of the computer in the solution of 
problems such as short circuit 
fault calculations, load flow 
study, economic load dispatch- 
ing and stability. Other topics 
may include protection, relaying 
or transmission system design. 

EE 638 Power Systems 
Engineering II 

Prerequisite: EE 637. 

EE 639 Electric Power 
Distribution 

Prerequisite: EE 637 or equiva- 
lent. Structure of electric power 
distribution, distribution trans- 
formers, subtransmission lines, 
substations, bus schemes, primary 
and secondary systems, radial and 
loop feeder designs, voltage drop 
and regulation, capacitors, power 
factor correction and voltage regu- 
lation, protection, buses, automat- 
ic reclosures and coordination. 



Courses 109 



EE 645 Introduction to 
Communication Systems 

The analysis and design of 
communication systems. Includes 
analog and digital signals, sam- 
pling, quantization, signal repre- 
sentation. Analog and digital 
modulation, pulse code modula- 
tion, delta modulation, time and 
frequency multiplexing. Noise in 
communication systems. 

EE 646 Digital 
Communications I 

Prerequisite: EE 645. Format- 
ting and baseband transmission, 
bandpass modulation and de- 
modulation, communication Unk 
analysis, channel coding syn- 
chronization. 



EE 647 Digital 
Communications II 

Prerequisite: EE 646. Multi- 
plexing and multiple access, 
spread spectrum techniques, 
source coding and encoding, en- 
cryption and decryption. 

EE 650 Random Signal Analysis 

A study of the theory of ran- 
dom signals and processes. 
Includes correlations, spectra, 
stationarity, ergodicity and sys- 
tems with random inputs. 
Hilberts transforms, shot noise, 
thermal noise, Markoff process- 
es, mean square estimation, spec- 
tral estimation and entropy. 

EE 652 Design of Digital Filters 

Techniques in the analysis 
and design of digital filters. 
Digital filter terminology and 
frequency responses. FIR filter 
design. IIR digital filter design 
including Butterworth and 
Chebyshev lowpass, highpass, 
bandpass and bandstop filters. 
The DFT and IDFT. FFT algo- 
rithms. 



EE 658 Microprocessors — 
Theory and Applications 

Prerequisite: CS 616 or equiva- 
lent. A study of the techniques 
and methods of designing digital 
systems using a microprocessor as 
the basic unit. Microcomputer as- 
sembly language, operating sys- 
tems, input/output devices, pro- 
grammable read-only memories 
and interfacing. 

EE 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. A study of selected top- 
ics of particular interest to stu- 
dents and instructor Course may 
be taken more than once. 



EE 680 Fiber Optic 
Communications 

The fundamentals of light- 
wave technology, optical fibers, 
LEDs and lasers, signal degrada- 
tion in optical fibers, photodetec- 
tors, power launching and cou- 
pling, connectors and splicing 
techniques, transmission link 
analysis. Includes selected labo- 
ratory experiments. 

EE 681 Lightwave Technology 

Prerequisite: EE 680. Advanced 
topics in lightwave technology. 
Optical fiber waveguides, trans- 
mission characteristics of optical 
fibers, ray theory and electro- 
magnetic mode theories are con- 
sidered. Forms of communica- 
tion systems and distribution 
networks. Optical sources, detec- 
tors and receivers are discussed 
in conjunction with modulation 
formats and system design. 



EE 685 Optimization of 
Engineering Systems 

Prerequisite: computer pro- 
gramming competence. Classical 
min-mix theory; constraints, 
search methods, gradient tech- 
niques, linear programming. 
Measures of optimality, perfor- 
mance functions. Discussion of 
selected topics from the follow- 
ing: methods of Fletcher and 
Powell, linear programming, cal- 
culus of variations, dynamic pro- 
gramming, the maximum princi- 
ple, nonlinear programming. 
Applications to design of filter 
networks, control systems and 
other engineering systems. 
Students will be required to com- 
plete a project. 

EE 695 Independent Study 

Prerequisite: permission of in- 
structor. A planned program of 
individual study or research 
under supervision of a faculty 
member. 



EE 697 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of 15 
credits of graduate work. Peri- 
odic meetings and discussions of 
the individual student's progress 
in the preparation of a thesis. 

EE 698 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



EE 699 Thesis III 

A continuation of Thesis II. 



Environmental 
Science 

EN 600 Environmental 
Geoscience 

Study of the systems of atmo- 
sphere, hydrosphere and litho- 
sphere important in the under- 
standing of the causes of and 
solutions to environmental prob- 
lems. Includes material from me- 
teorology, climatology, ocean- 
ography, geology, geophysics, 
geomorphology and hydrology. 
Some weekend field trips, or ac- 
ceptable alternative, required. 

EN 601 Principles of Ecology 

Presentation of current topics 
in the various fields of ecology 
including community, popula- 
tion and ecosystem ecology. Par- 
ticular emphasis on those areas 
related to environmental man- 
agement. Some weekend field 
trips, or acceptable alternative, 
required. 

EN 602 Environmental Effects of 
Pollutants 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
The demonstrated and suspected 
effects of air, water and other 
pollutants on natural systems 
and on human welfare. Methods 
of studying effects. Some week- 
end field trips, or acceptable al- 
ternative, required. 

EN 603 Terrestrial and Wetland 
Ecology 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
Study of terrestrial and wetland 
environments and ecological 
processes. Characterization, de- 
scription and mapping of habi- 
tats. Use of topographic maps, 
aerial photographs. National 
Wetland Inventory maps and 
simple survey techniques in en- 
vironmental investigations. 
Some weekend field trips, or ac- 
ceptable alternative, required. 



EN 604 Ecology of Inland 
Waters 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
Advanced study of ecological 
processes of inland waters, both 
lotic and lentic. Some weekend 
field trips, or acceptable alterna- 
tive, required. 

EN 605 Marine and Estuarine 
Ecology 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
Advanced study of ecological 
processes of estuaries and ma- 
rine habitats. Some weekend 
field trips, or acceptable alterna- 
tive, required. 

EN 606 Environmental Data 
Analysis 

Prerequisite: 20 graduate 
hours. The application of analyt- 
ic techniques to environmental 
data in the areas of applied ecol- 
ogy, environmental geology and 
chemistry. These include: ap- 
plied univariate and multivariate 
statistics as well as geostatistical 
methods. Introduction to micro- 
computer software available for 
environmental analyses. 

EN 607 Environmental Reports 
and Impact Assessment 

Prerequisites: EN 602 plus 
any one of EN 603, 604, or 605. 
Techniques for gathering and 
presenting environmental data, 
including literature sources, 
transformation of field data, 
graphic and tabular presenta- 
tion, and text preparation. Study 
of formats required for EIS, CAM 
and other common reports. 
Preparation of environmental 
impact assessments. Some field- 
work required. 



EN 608 Landscape Ecology 

Prerequisites: EN 600, EN 601. 
In-depth study of the characteris- 
tics and dynamics of terrestrial 
and aquatic ecosystems on a re- 
gional scale. Spatial relationships 
between ecosystems are exam- 
ined with regard to natural eco- 
logic and geologic functions and 
alterations due to human activi- 
ties. Applications to land-use 
planning, resource management, 
conservation and other environ- 
mental concerns are addressed 
via class projects. 

EN 610 Environmental Health 

Prerequisite: EN 601 or un- 
dergraduate biology major. Prin- 
ciples of public health with gen- 
eral emphasis given to 
environmental factors such as air 
and water pollutants, legal stan- 
dards and preventive measures 
and their relationships to public 
health. 



EN 612 Epidemiology 

An introduction to the princi- 
ples and methods of epidemiolo- 
gy. Concepts of disease, analysis 
of morbidity and mortality as 
well as observational and experi- 
mental techniques considered. 
Illustrative examples concentrate 
on environmental issues. 



EN 615 Toxicology 

Prerequisite: introductory 
chemistry. Introduction to envi- 
ronmental and industrial toxicol- 
ogy; toxicologic evaluation; the 
mode of entry, absorption and 
distribution of toxicants; the 
metabolism and excretion of 
toxic substances; interactions be- 
tween substances in toxicology; 
toxicologic data extrapolation; 
particulates; solvents and metals; 
agricultural chemicals — insecti- 
cides and pesticides; toxicology 
of plastics; gases; food additives; 
plant and animal toxins; carcino- 
gens, mutagens and teratogens. 
(See also SH 615.) 



Courses 111 



EN 617 Subsurface Assessment 

Prerequisites: EN 600, CH 
601. Introduction to conducting 
subsurface contamination assess- 
ments. Includes related environ- 
mental regulations and liabili- 
ties, site hydrogeology, chemical 
characterization of contami- 
nants, field methodologies, risk 
assessments and site contamina- 
tion remediation. Some field- 
work required. 

EN 618 Haizardous Materials 
Management 

The multidisciplinary facets 
of managing hazardous materi- 
als and wastes. Integrates spe- 
cialized knowledge from the 
fields of environmental biology, 
chemistry, engineering, hydroge- 
ology and public health in the 
techniques used to maintain 
compliance with environmental 
standards. Includes regulatory 
framework, practical exercises 
and concepts of sound practices 
of hazardous waste manage- 
ment. 



EN 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 

EN 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: permission of 
the instructor. Independent 
study under the supervision of 
an adviser. 



EN 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

EN 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 



EN 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



EN 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Executive M.B.A. 

The Executive M.B.A. program 
consists of the following 20 mod- 
ules, each four sessions in length. 

EXID 903 The Communication 
Process 

Analysis of communication 
and the functions of manage- 
ment with emphasis on percep- 
tion, persuasion, conflict and 
change. 

EXID 906 The Management 
Process 

The role of executives and 
managers in administrative and 
operational processes. Includes 
organizational goals and struc- 
ture, planning and performance 
controls and resource manage- 
ment. 



EXID 909 Business and 
Government Relations 

An analysis of the impact of 
the major regulatory agencies of 
the federal government upon 
business. Specific attention given 
to the legal and economic im- 
pacts of the agencies; their inde- 
pendence of action vis-a-vis 
Congress, the judiciary and each 
other. 



EXID 915 Quantitative Decision 
Making 

Probability and financial anal- 
ysis techniques within the frame- 
work of the randomness encoun- 
tered in the real world. Includes 
practical applications of expected 
values, value of information, 
Markov systems, game theory 
and decision theory. 

EXID 918 Managerial 
Economics 

Application of economic anal- 
ysis to business forecasting, 
planning and policy formulation. 
Includes cost-benefit analysis, 
cost estimation and break-even 
analysis. 

EXID 921 Executive Leadership 
Seminar 

Examination of a variety of 
methods of executive develop- 
ment to be accomplished through 
directed self-evaluation, role- 
playing and observation of suc- 
cessful executives through on-site 
visits or lectures by contemporary 
executives. 



EXID 924 Financial 
Management I 

Analysis of financial decision 
models for investment, financing 
and dividend decisions of the 
profit-oriented firm. Includes 
capital budgeting, capital struc- 
tures and the cost of capital and 
dividend policy. 

EXID 927 Financial 
Management II 

Analysis of financial decision 
models for the management of 
working capital. The manage- 
ment of current assets and the re- 
lated financing mixture ex- 
plored. 



112 



EXID 930 Marketing Practice 

The new marketing concept 
and its application in the modern 
corporation. Organizational as- 
pects and environmental deter- 
minants of marketing decisions 
are examined, culminating in a 
discussion of buyer behavior 
characteristics. Examines practi- 
cal considerations in using the el- 
ements of the marketing mix: 
product, price, channel and pro- 
motion policy. 

EXID 933 Managing the Global 
Marketplace 

An examination of the theory 
and practice of a national or in- 
ternational company trading in 
world markets, focusing on 
strategic planning for this envi- 
ronment from economic, politi- 
cal, social, regulatory and com- 
petitive points of view. 

EXID 939 Operations Research 
and Management 

Analysis of management sci- 
ence techniques from the execu- 
tive perspective. Focus on under- 
standing the value of such 
techniques as inventory and sys- 
tems modeling, queueing, linear 
programming and simulation 
with an emphasis on their roles 
in decision making. 

EXID 942 Accounting 

Examination of financial ac- 
counting standards; methods of fi- 
nancial statement analysis; and 
tools for planning, controlling and 
evaluating the economic perfor- 
mance of the firm. Includes finan- 
cial statement analysis, cost sys- 
tems, budgeting, standard costs 
and contribution reporting. 

EXID 943 Federal Taxation 

An introduction to federal 
taxation and its impact on busi- 
ness decision making. An 
overview of the basics of federal 
taxation, its traps and tax plan- 
ning opportunities. 



EXID 945 Human Resources 
Management 

Effective management of the 
aggregate human resource in the 
modern organization. Analysis 
of personnel policies and proce- 
dures, manpower planning, and 
employee training and policies. 

EXID 948 Labor and 
Management Relations 

An examination of the evolu- 
tion of the labor movement in 
the United States and the role 
that the federal government has 
played in the shaping of the 
labor laws pertinent to the collec- 
tive bargaining system. 

EXID 951 Marketing 
Management 

Strategic considerations and 
options in managing a firm's 
marketing function. Scope and 
methods of marketing research as 
well as issues involved in new 
product management discussed. 
The importance, opportunities 
and constraints of international 
marketing. The unique aspects of 
service marketing highlighted. 

EXID 954 Organizational 
Development 

Various methods for effective 
organizational development in 
contemporary environments ex- 
plored. Analysis of means to im- 
prove existing organizations in 
consideration of past history and 
changing value structures. 

EXID 957 Corporate Policy and 
Strategy 

Examination of the major 
management issues facing the 
chief executive with emphasis on 
resource allocation questions. 
Includes the strategy develop- 
ment process, supporting organi- 
zation structure and reward sys- 
tem. Serves as an integrating 
mechanism for several preceding 



EXID 960 Information 
Management 

Analysis of technologies, 
costs and challenges of integrat- 
ing computers into the modern 
business environment. 



EXID 999 Special Research 
Topics 

A seminar in which the culmi- 
nation of student research will be 
presented and critiqued, and in 
which state-of-the-art topics may 
be examined by nonfaculty guest 
lecturers. 



Finance 



FI 615 Finance 

Prerequisites; A 621, EC 603, 
EC 604, QA 604. The investment, 
financing and valuation of busi- 
ness firms. Includes: discounted 
cash flow, return on investment, 
investment decisions under un- 
certainty, long- and short-term 
sources of funds, optimal finan- 
cial structure, cost of capital, div- 
idend policy. (Expansion, merg- 
er, working capital management 
and failure and reorganization 
may also be covered.) 

FI 616 Applied Research 
Techniques for Financial 
Operations and Financial 
Market Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 615. Examines 
the ways various quantitative an- 
alytic techniques are used to im- 
prove financial decision making. 
Uses both mainframe and micro- 
computer application software. 



Courses 113 



FI 617 Financial Institutions and 
Capital Markets 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 651. 
Financial management of finan- 
cial institutions and capital mar- 
kets. Analyzes the institutional 
and theoretical structure of mon- 
etary change and the manner in 
which financial institutions and 
markets transmit and influence 
the impact of monetary policy. 
Special attention to the role of 
nonmonetary financial interme- 
diaries, the structure and regula- 
tion of capital markets and the 
functions of market yields as the 
price mechanism that allocates 
saving to various categories of 
economic investments. 

FI 618 Introduction to Financial 
Planning 

Prerequisite: FI 615. Introduct- 
ory course covering the personal 
planning process and investment 
options for individuals. Com- 
puterized spreadsheets required 
for some assignments. 

FI 619 Monetary and Central 
Banking Policy 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 651. 
The impact of monetary change 
upon employment, output and 
prices; the formulation and exe- 
cution of Federal Reserve policy 
designed to regulate money, 
credit and interest rates. 

FI 620 Working Capital 
Management and Planning 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 617, FI 
651 or permission of instructor. 
The examination and under- 
standing of working capital 
management, leasing, mergers 
and acquisitions, and overview 
of multinational finance. 



FI 622 Financial Management of 
Financial Services 

Prerequisites: FI 619 and FI 
651. An examination of new de- 
velopments and techniques in fi- 
nancial management applicable 
to deposit financial intermedi- 
aries (banks, savings and loans, 
savings banks, credit unions) fo- 
cusing on industry structure, 
regulation, liquidity manage- 
ment, lending management, in- 
vestment management and capi- 
tal management. 

FI 644 International Financial 
Management 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. 
Focus on foreign exchange risk 
management and on the financ- 
ing of imports and exports. 
Major attention also on long-run 
foreign investment decisions and 
to their evaluation, implementa- 
tion and control. 



FI 645 Corporate Financial 
Theory 

Prerequisites: FI 617, FI 651 
and permission of the finance 
adviser. An analysis of the theo- 
retical structure supporting opti- 
mum financial decision making 
by the business firm. Emphasis is 
placed on the determination of 
the combination of investment, 
financing and dividend deci- 
sions that maximizes the valua- 
tion of the firm within a security 
market context. 



FI 646 Advanced Capital Market 
Issues 

Prerequisites: FI 616, FI 617. 
An examination of current prac- 
tices and new developments in 
the capital markets. Various top- 
ics will be selected that highlight 
recent developments. The prima- 
ry areas of selection will be 
financial and capital market in- 
novations, monetary policy, do- 
mestic and international money 
markets, and financial market 
analytic techniques. Students re- 
quired to complete a major inde- 
pendent research project. 

FI 647 Advanced Corporate 
Financial Management Issues 

Prerequisites: FI 616, FI 645. 
An examination of develop- 
ments and techniques in finan- 
cial management, both theoreti- 
cal and practical. Selected topics 
highlight recent developments. 
The primary areas of selection 
will be corporate financial theory, 
domestic and international cor- 
porate operations, corporate fi- 
nancing techniques and corpo- 
rate financial policy. Students 
required to complete a major in- 
dependent research project. 

FI 649 Security Analysis 

Prerequisite: FI 651. An analy- 
sis of the determinants of valua- 
tion for fixed income securities, 
common stocks, convertible secu- 
rities, options and common stock 
warrants. Emphasis on the infor- 
mation and techniques relevant 
to security valuation and selec- 
tion and the structure and work- 
ings of the securities markets. 



114 



FI 651 Portfolio Management 
and Capital Market Analysis 

Prerequisites: FI 615 or per- 
mission of instructor. Considers 
the theoretical structure for the 
procedures (security analysis, 
portfolio analysis and portfolio 
selection) which constitute the 
process of portfolio manage- 
ment, as well as their limitations 
in practice. Additional attention 
on the logical implications of 
portfolio analysis for capital 
market theory. 

FI 655 Speculative Market 
Analysis 

Prerequisites: FI 617, FI 651. A 
conceptual and operational ex- 
amination of the markets in 
which financial futures and com- 
modities are traded, the partici- 
pants and major exchanges in- 
cluding an analysis of the major 
futures traded and the factors in- 
fluencing their prices. Option 
valuation theory also covered. 

FI 658 Financial Planning 
Management 

Prerequisites: FI 618 and FI 
649. A capstone course integrat- 
ing all coursework. Cases wall be 
used, along with computer simu- 
lation. It will be assumed that 
students are able to use comput- 
erized spreadsheets and statisti- 
cal packages. 

FI 661 Real Estate: Principles 
and Practices 

Prerequisites: FI 615, FI 651. 
Real estate from the investor's 
point of view. Impact of taxation 
on real estate investments. 
Emphasis on commercial land 
use through the use of case stud- 
ies and problems. 

FI 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



FI 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours or permission of the in- 
structor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 
viser. 



FI 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

FI 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Inde- 
pendent Study I. 

FI 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



FI 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



FI 701 Seminar in Financial 
Policy 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 137 for 
course description. 



Fire Science 



FS 625 Chemistry of Fires and 
Explosions 

An examination of the basic or- 
ganic chemistry and combustion 
and explosive properties of flam- 
mable materials. The chemical 
principles underlying fires and ex- 
plosions. Chemical properties of 
various synthetic materials and the 
products of their combustion. Fire 
retardant materials and chemicals 
used in fire extinguishment. 



FS 661 Systems Approach to 
Fire Safety I 

The systems approach to fire 
safety as used by fire protection 
engineers, fire science techni- 
cians and fire administrators in 
analyzing and designing fire 
safety in buildings. Considers 
the various routes that can be fol- 
lowed to achieve low-budget, 
logical, cost-effective ways of ac- 
complishing predetermined fire 
safety goals. 

FS 662 Systems Approach to 
Fire Safety II 

Prerequisite: FS 661 . A contin- 
uation of Systems Approach to 
Fire Safety 1. 

FS 664 Terrorism 

An understanding of the 
problems of terrorism as well as 
new developments in terrorist 
theory and strategies. Includes 
background on international ter- 
rorists and terrorist organiza- 
tions; terrorist profiles for the in- 
vestigator; terrorist situations, 
actions and reactions; assassina- 
tions; hostage situations; kidnap 
and ransom; arson and bomb- 
ings; antiterrorist organizations. 

FS 665 Legal Aspects of Fire and 
Arson Investigation 

The legal principles underly- 
ing and governing the conduct of 
criminal investigations, with par- 
ticular emphasis on arson. The 
criminal law relating to arson, es- 
tablishment of the crime, investi- 
gation and prosecution proce- 
dures in arson cases. 



Courses 115 



FS 666 Seminar on Industrial 
Fire Protecrion 

Prepares the fire science major 
to make decisions on various fire 
protection schemes in industry 
and other commercial property 
situations. Since fire protection 
responsibilities are often delegat- 
ed to the occupational safety or 
security manager, the course will 
provide these students with nec- 
essary background in fire protec- 



FS 667 Fire and Building Codes, 
Standards and Practices 

The study of building and fire 
codes and regulations as they re- 
late to the prevention and inci- 
dence of structural fires. Con- 
temporary building and fire 
codes and practices, and their en- 
forcement. Model building 
codes. Fire prevention and con- 
trol through building design. 
(See also CJ 667.) 

FS 668 Fire and Casualty 
Insurance Practices 

A study of financial risk and 
decision making from the inves- 
tigative point of view. Insurance 
rate making and relation to risk 
and other factors. Insurance ad- 
justment and economic factors 
that must be considered in fire 
and accident investigations. (See 
also CJ 668.) 

FS 669 Dynamics, Evaluation 
and Prevention of Structural 
Fires 

A detailed analysis of the evo- 
lution of modern structures and 
the mechanical systems neces- 
sary to provide safety and com- 
fort. The effect of the nature of 
structures and their mechanical 
systems on fire behavior. Struc- 
tural bases and mechanical sys- 
tems for fire protection and fire 
prevention. 



FS 670 Selected Topics 

An examination and evalua- 
tion of the current and future 
problems faced by today's fire, 
public safety, insurance and se- 
curity professionals. 

FS 681 Seminar/Research 
Project in Public Safety 
Management I 

Prerequisite: 18 undergradu- 
ate/graduate hours in a public 
safety discipline or permission of 
the program coordinator. 
Problems in public safety man- 
agement and current techniques 
being used to deal with these 
problems. Requires a supervised 
research project directly related 
to the topic and weekly meetings 
with faculty throughout the 
term. Format for course may 
vary; a three-day specially 
scheduled seminar may be in- 
cluded. 



FS 682 Seminar/Research 
Project in Public Safety 
Management II 

A second course in the field of 
public safety management. See 
FS 681 for course description. 

FS 683 Seminar/Research 
Project on Comparative Public 
Safety Systems 

Prerequisite: 18 undergradu- 
ate/graduate hours in a public 
safety discipline or permission of 
the program coordinator. 
Examination, assessment and 
comparison of various approach- 
es used in protecting the public's 
health and safety. Current man- 
agement approaches to public 
safety problems. Requires a su- 
pervised research project directly 
related to the topic and weekly 
meetings with faculty through- 
out the term. Format for course 
may vary; a three-day specially 
scheduled seminar may be in- 
cluded. 



FS 684 Fire/ Accident Scene 
Reconstruction 

Application of the principles 
of reconstruction of the scene of 
a fire or accident, including 
proper procedure for examining 
physical evidence to determine 
the cause. Emphasis on prepara- 
tion of reports, testimony for 
hearings and trials, rendering of 
advisory opinions to assist in res- 
olution of disputes affecting life 
and property. 

FS 690 Research Seminar 

Prerequisite: 30 graduate 
credit hours. A major research 
project under the supervision of 
the director of the fire science 
program. 

FS 693 Internship 

The student's formal educa- 
tional development comple- 
mented by field experience in 
various fire science settings or 
agencies. Supervised by depart- 
ment faculty. 

FS 695 Independent Study 

A directed, independent learn- 
ing experience with the topic and 
format to be agreed upon by the 
student and supervising faculty. 

FS 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussions 
of the individual student's pro- 
gress in the preparation of a thesis. 

FS 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



116 



Hotel and 

Restaurant 

Management 



HR 600 Hotel and Restaurant 
Industry 

Introductory course designed 
to familiarize graduate students 
with the scope of the hotel and 
restaurant industry with empha- 
sis on current and future trends 
in management and operations. 
Includes: hotel and restaurant 
structure and staffing, sales and 
public relations, cost control, ac- 
counting, communications and 
organization procedures. No 
credit. 

HR 605 Hospitality Corporate 
Law 

Prerequisite: HR 600 or equiv- 
alent. An in-depth analysis of 
legal issues facing operators of 
businesses in the hospitality in- 
dustry at the corporate level. 
Critical examination of contem- 
porary issues resulting from the 
regulatory, restrictive and sup- 
plementary activities of govern- 
ment analyzed. Student interac- 
tion with industry, labor and 
government representatives and 
agencies encouraged. Case stud- 
ies reviewed and analyzed. 

HR 630 Personnel and Labor 
Relations in Hotel and 
Restaurant Operations 

Prerequisite: HR 600 or equiv- 
alent. Includes: organizational 
behavior, personnel selection, 
placement, supervision, job eval- 
uation, wage and salary adminis- 
tration, motivation, morale and 
union-management relations. 
Case studies and role playing are 
integral parts of the course. 



HR 635 Hospitality Industry 
Capital Budgeting and 
Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisites: HR 600 or 
equivalent. Investigates financial 
planning and control at the cor- 
porate level of hospitality indus- 
tries. Investment decisions, 
growth and expansion strategies, 
planning capital structure and 
the cost of capital analyzed. 
Working capital management, 
capital budget and methods of fi- 
nance aimed at maintaining liq- 
uidity and profitability ad- 
dressed. Analysis of actual cases 
is supplemented by selected 
readings. 

HR 650 Hospitality Corporate 
Marketing 

Prerequisites: HR 600 or equi- 
valent. Understanding the hospi- 
tality corporate market as it re- 
lates to social, psychological, en- 
vironmental, economic, and per- 
sonal factors for the develop- 
ment of strategies for cultivating 
new markets and new business. 
Strategic and decision-making 
aspects of hospitality marketing 
are stressed. Review of case 
studies and student interaction 
with industry and marketing 
agencies. 

HR 655 Development of Hotel 
and Restaurant Operations 

Prerequisite: HR 600 or equiv- 
alent. Examines the processes for 
developing profitable hospitality 
services. Some of the characteris- 
tics, opportunities, risks and de- 
cisions involved in starting hos- 
pitality operations studied. 
Emphasis on alternative financ- 
ing methods and avenues. 

HR 670 Selected Topics 

An in-depth examination of 
topics in the field of hospitality 
which reflect the special interests 
of students and the instructor. 
May be taken more than once. 



HR 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours and permission of the in- 
structor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 
viser. 



HR 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a faculty member. 

HR 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independ- 
ent Study I. 

HR 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussion of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



HR 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



History 



HS 607 World History in the 
Twentieth Century 

A survey of major global 
events and trends since 1900. 
Advanced industrial societies 
emphasized, but coverage of 
major regions of the Third World 
also studied. Includes: the World 
Wars, patterns of economic coop- 
eration and competition, decolo- 
nization and East-West conflicts. 



HS 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



Courses 117 



HS 695 Independent Study 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study or research under 
the supervision of a member of 
the faculty. 



Humanities 

HU 651-659 Topics in 
Humanities 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



HU 695 Independent Study 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study or research under 
the supervision of a member of 
the faculty. 



International 
Business 

IB 643 International Business 

Prerequisites: EC 603, EC 604. 
An introduction to the political, 
economic, technological and cul- 
tural setting of international 
business. Includes: the problems, 
policies and operational proce- 
dures of the multinational corpo- 
ration, including the adjustment 
to foreign cultures and govern- 
ments. The review of the devel- 
opment, organization and struc- 
ture of the international firm. 



IB 645 Comparative 
International Business 
Environments 

Prerequisite: IB 643, MK 609. 
A comparative approach to the 
study of the noneconomic as- 
pects of foreign markets of sever- 
al representative areas in the 
world. Focus on the interaction 
between the sociocultural envi- 
ronment of host nations and the 
multinational firm. 



IB 651 International Marketing 

Prerequisite: IB 643, MK 609. 
The apphcation of marketing prin- 
ciples and techniques in a global 
environment. A managerial ap- 
proach to international marketing 
as it pertains to product policies, 
market channels, pricing, advertis- 
ing in a foreign market. Emphasis 
on marketing in different cultural 
settings. 

IB 652 Multinational Business 
Management 

Prerequisites: IB 643, MK 609. 
An examination of global strate- 
gy, ownership control, organiza- 
tion and resource management. 
Major attention given to interna- 
tional risk analysis. 

IB 660 East and Southeast Asian 
Business Systems 

Prerequisites: IB 643 and MG 
637, or permission of the adviser 
for international business. An 
analysis of the business systems of 
the industrialized, newly industri- 
alized and developing nations of 
East and Southeast Asia. Focus on 
business organization, processes, 
procedures and behavior. 
Emphasis on the historical, politi- 
cal and cultural underpinnings of 
business activity. Business strate- 
gies and negotiating techniques to 
be used with East and Southeast 
Asian governments and firms. 

IB 661 Investment Strategies for 
Developing Countries 

Prerequisites: FI 615, IB 643, 
MG 637 and MK 609. Exam- 
ination of strategies which can be 
used by developing nations to at- 
tract foreign investment in the 
form of capital, technology, and 
management and marketing 
skills. Methods of assessing the 
resource potential of developing 
countries will be studied, includ- 
ing how to establish competitive 
advantage and how to select the 
most attractive country and in- 
dustry targets. 



IB 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the student 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



IB 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
and permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the su- 
pervision of an adviser. 

IB 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

IB 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 

IB 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussion of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



IB 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis 1. 



Industrial 
Engineering 

IE 601 Introduction to 
Operations Research/ 
Management Science 

Prerequisite: IE 607. Intro- 
duction to the techniques and 
philosophies of management sci- 
ence and operations research. 
Includes: linear programming, 
inventory analysis, queueing 
theory, dynamic programming, 
decision analysis and other mod- 
eling techniques. 



118 



IE 604 Management Systems 

Techniques of industrial and 
governmental systems manage- 
ment including general systems 
and organizational theory. 

IE 607 Probability Theory 

Prerequisite: M 610 or equiva- 
lent. Probability of events. Ran- 
dom variables and expectations; 
discrete and continuous distribu- 
tions; important standard distri- 
butions and applications; mo- 
ment generating functions; 
central limit theorem. 



IE 609 Descriptive and 
Inferential Statistics 

Prerequisite: IE 607 or equiva- 
lent. Inferential statistical designs, 
including basic statistical tests and 
analysis of variance. Statistical 
theories and application of corre- 
lation analysis, multiple linear re- 
gression, nonlinear regression and 
analysis of covariance. 



IE 612 Managerial Interactions 1 

An interdisciplinary systems 
approach to human behavior in 
organizations with emphasis on 
the impact of industrial engi- 
neering methods on organiza- 
tional performance. Deals with 
individual motivation and face- 
to-face interaction in managerial 
roles. 



IE 613 Managerial Interactions II 

Prerequisite: IE 612. Contin- 
uation of IE 612. Organizational 
development, job enrichment 
and modern work attitudes. 



IE 614 Data Information 
Systems 

Prerequisites: any one of CS 
603 through CS 610 or equivalent, 
IE 604. Introduction to automated 
information systems planning 
and operations and their impact 
on management decision making, 
control functions and communi- 
cation capabilities. An overview 
of concepts and procedures with 
applications in urban environ- 
ments, large organizations and 
governmental agencies. Tech- 
niques presented include PERT/ 
CPM, Gantt charting, cost-benefit 
analysis. 

IE 615 Transportation and 
Distribution 

Prerequisite: IE 601. Introduc- 
tion to transportation science 
with emphasis on physical distri- 
bution problems. Survey of oper- 
ations research models and opti- 
mization strategies and their 
roles in transportation systems 
management. 

IE 621 Linear Programming 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or equiva- 
lent. Thorough coverage of the 
techniques and applications of 
linear programming. Special 
simplex forms and optimality 
conditions, duaUty and sensitivi- 
ty are covered. Applications to 
network flow problems. 

IE 622 Queueing Theory 

Prerequisite: IE 601. Elements 
of queueing theory including fi- 
nite and infinite cases. Single 
ser\'er and multiple server paral- 
lel channels/series queues and 
special cases are analyzed. 

IE 623 Decision Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 609. Decision 
theory, game theory; benefit-cost 
analyses under uncertainty; ad- 
vanced engineering economic 
analysis. 



IE 624 Quality Analysis 

Prerequisite: IE 609. Concepts 
of quality and statistical quality 
analysis. Sampling techniques 
and decision processes. 

IE 625 Advanced Mathematical 
Programming 

Prerequisites: CS 606B, IE 621. 
Advanced mathematical pro- 
gramming techniques. Integer 
programming, goal program- 
ming, and multiple objective lin- 
ear programming techniques will 
be covered. Computer applica- 
tions will be demonstrated. 



IE 643 Reliability and 
Maintainability 

Prerequisite: IE 609 or QA 
604. The basic theory and 
methodology of reliability and 
maintainability, including appli- 
cation of discrete and continuous 
distributions and statistical de- 
signs. Reliability, estimation, 
structure models and growth 
models. 



IE 651 Human Engineering I 

An introduction to the design 
of machines, jobs and environ- 
ments with consideration of er- 
gonomic principles. Coverage of 
behavioral, anatomical, physio- 
logical and organizational factors 
affecting performance, comfort 
and safety. Laboratory fee re- 
quired. 

IE 652 Human Engineering II 

Prerequisite: IE 651. Continu- 
ation of IE 651. In-depth analysis 
of selected topics in ergonomics 
including work physiology, an- 
thropometry and signal detection 
theory. Laboratory experiments 
and reports included. Laboratory 
fee required. 



Courses 119 



IE 655 Manufacturing Analysis 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
courses in manufacturing or man- 
ufacturing work experience and 
consent of instructor. The princi- 
ples of the theory of metal cutting 
and metal working for improving 
the manufacturing operations in- 
volving metal machining and 
metal working. An opportunity 
for the students to thoroughly un- 
derstand the experimental ap- 
proaches used in manufacturing. 
Laboratory fee required. 

IE 671 Current Topics in 
Operations Research 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or permis- 
sion of instructor. An examination 
of new developments or current 
practices in operations research. 
A topic will be selected for thor- 
ough study. Possible subject areas 
include nonlinear programming, 
network theory, scheduling tech- 
niques, specialized techniques, 
specialized applications. Content 
may vary from trimester to 
trimester. 

IE 672 Current Topics in 
Industrial Engineering 

Prerequisite: IE 601 or permis- 
sion of the instructor. An exami- 
nation of new developments or 
current practices in industrial en- 
gineering. A topic will be selected 
for thorough study. Possible sub- 
ject areas include reliability, pro- 
duction engineering, human fac- 
tors, specialized applications. 
Content may vary from trimester 
to trimester. 



IE 681 System Simulation 

Prerequisites: IE 601; CS 606B 
or CS 606 and permission of the 
instructor. Methods of modeling 
and simulating man-machine 
systems. Thorough coverage of 
discrete event simulation. Ran- 
dom number generators and 
variate generations discussed. 
Use of a simulation package and 
several projects will be required. 



IE 683 Systems Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601 or QA 
605, IE 614. Techniques and 
philosophies defining the con- 
cept of systems analysis present- 
ed in detail; illustrated with 
large-scale case studies. Diverse 
systems are analyzed covering 
the social, urban, industrial and 
military spheres. Techniques in- 
clude utility theory, decision 
analysis and technological fore- 
casting. 

IE 685 Theory of Optimization 

Prerequisites: IE 601; CS 606 or 
equivalent. Methods of nonlinear 
optimization and programming. 
Search methods including golden 
section and dichotomous; con- 
strained and unconstrained opti- 
mization including Rosenbrocks 
and Fletcher-Powell algorithms. 
Penalty and barrier function 
methods. 



IE 686 Inventory Analysis 

Prerequisites: IE 601, IE 607 or 
QA 605. Inventory theory and 
practical applications in operat- 
ing inventory systems. Model 
construction, optimization and 
computer simulation. 

IE 687 Stochastic Processes 

Prerequisite: IE 601. The theo- 
ry and application of discrete and 
continuous-time stochastic pro- 
cesses. Areas of application in- 
clude queueing, inventory, main- 
tenance and probabilistic 
dynamic programming models. 

IE 688 Design of Experiments 

Prerequisite: IE 609 or equiva- 
lent. Principles of modern statis- 
tical experimentation and prac- 
tice in use of basic designs for 
scientific and industrial experi- 
ments; single factor experiments, 
randomized blocks, Latin 
squares; factorial and fractional 
factorial experiments; surface fit- 
ting designs. 



IE 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours and permission of the pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
study under the guidance of an 
adviser into an area of mutual in- 
terest, such study terminating in 
a technical report of academic 
merit. Research may constitute a 
survey of a technical area in in- 
dustrial engineering or opera- 
tions research, or may involve 
the solution of an actual or hypo- 
thetical technical problem. 

IE 695 Independent Study I 

Prerequisite: permission of 
the program coordinator. Inde- 
pendent study under the guid- 
ance of an adviser into an area 
designated by the program co- 
ordinator. 



IE 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 

IE 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



IE 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



IE 704 Seminar in Management 
and Control Systems 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 



120 



Business Law 

LA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



LA 673 Business Law I: 
Contracts and Sales 

A study of the legal aspects of 
contracts and the results of con- 
tractual obligations. Legal prob- 
lems stemming from the sale of 
goods, including the rights and 
duties of buyers and sellers and 
the remedies available to them. 



LA 674 Business Law IL 
Business Organizations and 
Negotiable Instruments 

Prerequisite; LA 673. Intro- 
duction to problems of formation 
and operation of legal groups 
with particular emphasis on the 
law of agencies, partnerships 
and corporations. Includes the 
law of negotiable instruments. 

LA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor 
Independent study under the su- 
pervision of an adviser 

LA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

LA 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Independent 
Study I. 

LA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours. 
Periodic meetings and discussion of 
the individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

LA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Logistics 



LG 660 Logistics Technology 
and Management 

Designed to provide to the 
student a broad survey of the 
wide range of logistics activities. 
Subjects covered: the concepts of 
the integrated logistics manage- 
ment system, customer inter- 
faces, inventory management 
and support of spares and sup- 
plies, physical distribution man- 
agement as well as the logistical 
organization planning and ad- 
ministration. Includes the quan- 
titative analytic techniques and 
computational tools commonly 
used in the logistical decision- 
making process. 

LG 663 Logistics Management 
in the System Acquisition 
Process 

Designed to provide students 
with a general knowledge of the 
management process for the 
acquisition of equipment and 
material. Includes: test and 
evaluations, specifications as a 
procurement instrument, pro- 
curement methods, types of con- 
tracts and management system 
interfaces. 



LG 665 Integrated Logistics 
Support Analysis 

Designed to provide students 
with an opportunity to under- 
stand the concept of Integrated 
Logistics Support (ILS) and an 
overview of each of the elements 
of logistics specialties, their inter- 
face and interaction, as well as 
the integration of the separate lo- 
gistics specialties into a coherent 
effort and output. Includes: relia- 
bility, maintainability, life-cycle 
cost, ILS management and major 
ILS decisions involved, test and 
support equipment and person- 
nel, and training warranties. 



LG 669 Life Cycle Cost Analysis 

A study of Life Cycle Cost 
Analysis (LCCA), a state-of-the- 
art management tool used in the 
defense industry to assist and ad- 
vise decision makers in identify- 
ing a preferred choice among all 
possible alternatives in acquisi- 
tion of new equipment and /or 
systems. Includes: techniques 
and concepts such as the total 
cost concept, the fixed cost crite- 
rion, the fixed effectiveness crite- 
rion and the marginal utility cri- 
terion. Management decision 
making emphasized. 

LG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor May be taken 
more than once. 



LG 672 Designing for Logistics 
Support 

Overview of strategies and 
techniques for securing good lo- 
gistics support through product 
design, manufacturing, invento- 
ry management, field mainte- 
nance, and customer education 
and training. Discussion of au- 
tomation, smart systems, cost-ef- 
fectiveness trade-offs and use of 
operations research optimization. 

LG 673 Human Engineering in 
Logistics Support 

Study of the human element 
in logistics and the role of human 
engineering in creating high per- 
formance supply, repair and re- 
placement activities. Adverse 
conditions and hostile environ- 
ments analyzed. User feedback, 
simulation and artificial intelli- 
gence in the framework of de- 
sign, training and end-use perfor- 
mance. 



LG 675 Logistics Techniques 
and Policy 

Analysis of developing DOD 
policy in the field of logistics and 
its likely impact on both foreign 
and domestic defense contrac- 
tors. Overview of emerging tech- 
nologies and weapons systems, 
and of the resultant demands ex- 
pected of logistics support. Dis- 
cussion of warranty concepts, 
life-cycle considerations and fu- 
ture economic implications. 

LG 676 Logistics Products 

Description of logistics prod- 
ucts and systems in the context 
of deliverable documents, data- 
bases, data acquisition, software 
and skilled manpower Study of 
the logistics management func- 
tion in defense-related organiza- 
tions and the consequences of a 
growing logistics emphasis, in- 
cluding organizational design to 
meet customer needs and gov- 
ernment regulations. 

LG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor 
Independent study under the 
supervision of an adviser. 

LG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

LG 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 



LG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussion of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



LG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis L 



Mathematics 



M 610 Fundamentals of 
Calculus 

Prerequisite: M 115 (pre-cal- 
culus mathematics) or equiva- 
lent. Review of algebra and trig- 
onometric functions. Topics from 
calculus, including differentia- 
tion and integration methods ap- 
plied to problems in science, 
business and the social sciences. 
A review of series. 

M 615 Linear Mathematics and 
Combinatorics 

Prerequisite: M 610 or equiva- 
lent. Discrete mathematics topics 
used extensively in computer sci- 
ence, including linear algebra, 
graph theory and combinatorics. 
Emphasis on applications to 
computer science. 

M 616 Applied Modem Algebra 
for Computer Science 

Prerequisite: M 615. Advanced 
topics in logic and combinatorics 
as well as an introduction to dis- 
crete modern algebra and its ap- 
plications to computer science. 

M 620 Numerical Analysis 

Prerequisites: a minimum of 
12 credit hours of undergraduate 
mathematics, including calculus 
and linear algebra; knowledge of 
a computer programming lang- 
uage such as Pascal, FORTRAN 
or BASIC. Topics include: solu- 
tion of transcendental equations 
by iterative methods; solution of 
systems of linear equations (ma- 
trix inversion, etc.); interpolation, 
numerical differentiation and in- 
tegration; solution of ordinary 
differential equations. 



Courses 121 

M 624 Applied Mathematics 

Prerequisite: a minimum of 12 
credit hours of undergraduate 
mathematics, including calculus 
and differential equations. 
Special functions; Fourier series 
and integrals; integral trans- 
forms (Fourier, Laplace, etc.) and 
their use in solution of boundary 
value problems. 



M 632 Methods of Complex 
Analysis 

Prerequisite: graduate stand- 
ing in engineering or mathemat- 
ics. A study of the applications of 
the methods of complex variables 
to engineering and physical sci- 
ences. Includes: analytic function 
theory, contour integration and 
conformal mapping. 



M 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of 
the instructor. A study of select- 
ed topics of particular interest to 
the students and instructor. May 
be taken more than once. 



M 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours or permission of the in- 
structor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 



M 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

M 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 



M 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



M 699 Thesis II 

A conhnuation of Thesis I. 



122 



Mechanical 
Engineering 



ME 602 Mechanical Engineering 
Analysis 

Topics in vector calculus and 
complex variables. Solution of 
partial and differential equations 
as applied to mechanical engi- 
neering. 

ME 604 Numerical Techniques 
in Mechanical Engineering 

Prerequisite: knowledge of 
FORTRAN. Review of matrix al- 
gebra and simultaneous equa- 
tions. Numerical integration and 
differentiation, including tech- 
niques such as Euler, Runge- 
Kutta, Milne, shooting, Crank- 
Nicolson and FEM. Emphasis on 
numerical solutions to ordinary 
and partial differential equations 
relevant to mechanical engineer- 



ME 605 Finite Element Methods 
in Engineering 

Prerequisite: ME 604 or M 620. 
Basic concepts underlying the 
FEM. Displacement and weighted 
residual formulations of the finite 
element approach to numerical 
solutions. Applications to one- 
and two-dimensional problems in 
areas such as elasticity, heat trans- 
fer and fluid mechanics. 



ME 610 Advanced Dynamics 

Kinematics and dynamics of 
single particles and systems of 
particles. Lagrange's equations. 
Hamilton's principle and canoni- 
cal transformation theory. The 
inertia tensor and rigid body mo- 
tion. 



ME 611 System Vibrations 

Advanced techniques for 
analysis of vibrations in mechan- 
ical systems. Multiple degrees of 
freedom, random noise inputs 
among topics covered. 



ME 612 Random Vibrations 

Prerequisite: ME 602 or con- 
sent of the instructor. Review of 
the theory of stochastic process- 
es. Stationarv and nonstationary 
stochastic excitations. Random 
vibrations of single degree-of- 
freedom systems. Response of 
multiple degree-of-freedom sys- 
tems to random loads. Random 
vibrations of continuous sys- 
tems. Nonlinear system analysis. 
Method of averaging and multi- 
scales. Introduction to nonlinear 
random vibrations. Method of 
Fokker-Planck equation. Pertur- 
bation, equivalent linearization, 
stochastic averaging and other 
approximate techniques. Appli- 
cations to mechanical, civil and 
earthquake engineering prob- 
lems. 

ME 613 Fundamentals of 
Acoustics 

Basic theory of acoustics in 
stationary media; plane, cylindri- 
cal and spherical waves; reflec- 
tion, transmission and absorp- 
tion characteristics; sources of 
sound; propagation and attenua- 
tion in ducts and enclosures. 

ME 615 Theory of Elasticity 

Index notation; Cartesian ten- 
sors and coordinate transforma- 
tion; stress tensor and field equa- 
tion; analysis of stress and strain 
in two and three dimensions; 
Airy stress function; applications 
to problems of torsion and bend- 
ing; experimental methods. 

ME 620 Classical 
Thermodynamics 

Phenomenological equilibri- 
um and nonequilibrium thermo- 
dynamics. Formulation and ap- 
plication of fundamental laws 
and concepts; chemical thermo- 
dynamics. 



ME 625 Mechanics of Continua 

Tensor analysis, stress vector 
and stress tensor, kinematics of 
deformation, material derivative, 
fundamental laws of continuum 
mechanics, conservation theo- 
rems, constitutive laws and repre- 
sentative applications. 

ME 630 Advanced Fluid 
Mechanics 

Advanced topics from among 
the following areas: perfect fluids, 
viscous fluids, turbulence, 
boundary layer theory, surface 
phenomena, shock waves and gas 
dynamics. 

ME 632 Advanced Heat Transfer 

Review of the basic concepts 
of conduction and radiation. 
Detailed treatment of laminar, 
turbulent, free and forced con- 
vectional flows. Computer pro- 
jects. 

ME 635 Dynamic Systems and 
Control 

Introduction to the modeling 
of dynamic systems. Emphasis 
on the analysis of first and high- 
er order continuous-time linear 
models. Feedback techniques 
with examples from various 
branches of mechanical engi- 
neering. 

ME 638 Measurement and 
Instrumentation in Mechanical 
Engineering 

Measurement principles, in- 
cluding error analysis. Instru- 
ment systems: sensing, transmit- 
ting and terminating devices. 
Typical systems and devices for 
measuring motion, force, stress, 
strain, pressure, flow and tem- 
perature. 



Courses 123 



ME 645 Computational Fluid 
Dynamics and Heat Transfer 

Prerequisite: ME 630; ME 604 
or M 620. Current methods of 
computer solutions of tfie conser- 
vation equations of fluid dynam- 
ics. Viscous, incompressible, 
compressible and shock flows. 
Real gas equations of state. 
Computer projects. 

ME 670 Selected Topics 

Prerequisite: permission of 
the instructor. A study of select- 
ed topics of particular interest to 
the students and instructor. May 
be taken more than once. 



ME 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

ME 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 



ME 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 18 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



ME 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Management 



MG 625 Systems Techniques in 
Business Administration 

An integrated study of the 
techniques for solving administra- 
tive problems, including the anal- 
ysis and improvement of organi- 
zational structures, office 
procedures, forms design, records 
management, reports and equip- 
ment standards. The conduct of a 
comprehensive systems survey 
using these techniques explored in 
depth, as are flow charting and the 
preparation of manuals. 

MG 637 Management 

A study of the fimctions of 
management: planning, organiz- 
ing, directing, controlling, coordi- 
nating. 

MG 638 Cost Benefit 
Management 

Prerequisites: EC 603, QA 604. 
An introduction to and overs'iew 
of the field of cost/ 
benefit management. Funda- 
mental theoretical evaluation of 
cost/benefit of a project. 
Includes: the selection of the best 
investment criteria, the external 
environmental spillover effects 
and the application of cost/bene- 
fit management in decision mak- 
ing under uncertainty. 

MG 640 Management of Health 
Care Organizations 

Identification of the character- 
istics of health care organizations 
and the dimensions of man- 
agement in such organizations. 
Examination and application of 
the principles of management 
necessary for the successful op- 
eration of health care organiza- 
tions. M.B.A. students in the 
health care concentration take 
MG 640 in place of MG 637 in the 
required core curriculum. 



MG 645 Management of Human 
Resources 

A study of organizational 
practices in the management of 
human resources. Manpower 
planning, recruitment, selection, 
training, compensation and con- 
temporary problems of the field. 

MG 650 Entrepreneurship 

Prerequisites: A 621, Fl 615, 
MG 637, MK 609, or permission 
of the instructor. Deals with the 
establishment of a new business 
venture, covering such topics as 
site development, market analy- 
sis, staffing, inventory control, 
personnel relations and funding. 

MG 655 Advanced Business 
Strategy 

Prerequisites: FI 615, MG 637. 
An analysis of corporate combi- 
nations and their effects on man- 
agement, labor, consumers and 
the economy. Specific topics in- 
clude the economic and financial 
setting of business combinations; 
the motives for merger; merger 
valuation; merger negotiations, 
the integration of merged units 
with the balance of corporate ac- 
tivities; divestitures and spinoffs. 

MG 660 Comparative 
Management 

Prerequisite: MG 637. A study 
and comparison of managerial 
systems and practices in different 
organizations and /or countries 
throughout the world. A concep- 
tual framework is developed to 
analyze the interaction between 
managerial processes and cultur- 
al factors as they affect business 
activity. 



124 



MG 661 Development of 
Management Thought 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Study 
of the hterature from various dis- 
ciplines in order to determine the 
thinking and practices of leaders 
of organizations, past and pre- 
sent. The historical perspective of 
management thought. The contri- 
butions of religion, philosophy, 
economics, sociology and psy- 
chology to management thought 
and practice. Emphasis on pio- 
neering works in the manage- 
ment of organizations. Case 
studies of the thinking and prac- 
tices of famous leaders of Amer- 
ican business enterprises. 

MG 662 Organization Theory 

Prerequisite: MG 637. A sur- 
vey of the literature on theories 
of organization with emphasis 
on contemporary theories. 
Application of the theories to 
management and organizational 
problems will be attempted. 
Difficulties arising between theo- 
ry and practice will be examined. 

MG 663 Leadership in 
Organizations 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Exam- 
ination of theories and research 
findings from the behavioral sci- 
ences that are relevant to leader- 
ship in organizations. The role of 
the leader within the organiza- 
tion; the prerequisites, knowl- 
edge and practices required for 
successful leadership. Programs 
for the development of leaders 
explored. 



MG 664 Organizational 
Effectiveness 

Prerequisite: MG 637. Identi- 
fication of the criteria necessary 
for developing and maintaining 
effective organizations. A study 
of the concepts that may be uti- 
lized in the management of these 
criteria. Approaches that may be 
examined and applied to prob- 
lem situations through cases and 
role playing. 

MG 665 Compensation 
Administration 

Prerequisites: EC 625 andMG 
645. A study of the compensation 
function in organizations. 
Establishing wages and salaries, 
fringe benefits and incentives. 

MG 669 Advanced Business 
Policy 

Prerequisites: MG 637 and 
three additional graduate credits 
in management. Examination of 
management policies and strate- 
gies for the complex organization 
operating in a dynamic environ- 
ment, from the viewpoint of the 
top level executives of the organi- 
zation. Develops analytic frame- 
works for the management of nu- 
merous elements involved in 
assuring the fulfillment of the 
goals of the total organization. 
Integrates the student's general 
business knowledge with the re- 
quired courses in the M.B.A. pro- 
gram. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of oral and written 
skills by the examination and dis- 
cussion of cases. 



MG 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



MG 678 Personnel Management 
Seminar 

Prerequisites: EC 625, MG 
637, MG 645 and P 619. A semi- 
nar in the personnel and man- 
power management function of 
the modern work organization. 
The use of an integrated behav- 
ioral, quantitative and systems 
approach permits an applied 
multidisciplinary synthesis of 
the various aggregate manpower 
management subsystems re- 
quired in the modem work orga- 
nization. 

MG 679 Industrial Relations 
Seminar 

Prerequisites: EC 625, EC 687, 
MG 637 and P 619. A seminar in 
industrial relations and the labor- 
management relations function of 
the modern work organization. 
The use of an integrated behav- 
ioral, economic and legal ap- 
proach permits an applied multi- 
disciplinary synthesis of the 
employee relations function re- 
quired in either nonunionized or 
unionized work organizations. 

MG 680 Current Topics in 
Business Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours or permission of the in- 
structor. An integrative course 
examining the role of business in 
societv and relating the business 
firm to its social, political, legal 
and economic environments. 
While the exact content of this 
seminar is expected to vary from 
trimester to trimester in accor- 
dance with the varied academic 
interests and professional back- 
grounds of different faculty han- 
dling the course, the basic theme 
is the role of the business firm as 
the "keeper" of the market mech- 
anism and the means for orga- 
nizing resources in the economy. 



Courses 125 



MG 685 Research Methods in 
Business Administration 

Prerequisite: At least 24 grad- 
uate hours including QA 604 or 
equivalent. Designed to familiar- 
ize administrators with methods 
of business and social research 
and to assist them in the presen- 
tation, interpretation and appli- 
cation of research data. 



MG 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: all other courses 
in the required core curriculum of 
the master's degree program in- 
cluding MG 685. All students will 
complete an independent re- 
search study and participate in an 
integrative seminar. 

MG 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

MG 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 

MG 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussion of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



MG 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



MG 701 Research Design I 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 

MG 702 Research Design II 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 



MG 737 Seminar in 
Management 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 

MG 738 Policy and Strategic 
Decision Making 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 

MG 801 Dissertation I 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 

MG 802 Dissertation II 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 

MG 803 Dissertation III 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 

MG 804 Dissertation IV 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 



Marketing 



MK 609 Marketing 

Prerequisite: EC 603. An inten- 
sive study of modern marketing 
fundamentals; a study of the deci- 
sion-making problems encoun- 
tered by the marketing executive 
and the relation of marketing to 
environmental forces. 



MK 616 Buyer Behavior 

Prerequisite: MK 609. An ex- 
amination of the principal com- 
prehensive household and orga- 
nizational buyer behavior 
models and the behavioral sci- 
ence theories on which such ap- 
plied models are based. Analysis 
of the buyer at the individual 
level, at the social level and at 
the organizational level. 

MK 621 Marketing Financial 
Services 

Prerequisites: PI 615, MK 609. 
An intensive study of the mod- 
em marketing fundamentals and 
how they apply to the financial 
services industry. Special atten- 
tion on the insurance, banking 
and securities industries. 



MK 638 Competitive Marketing 
Strategy 

Prerequisites: MK 609 plus 
three additional credits in market- 
ing or MG 669. Focuses on prod- 
uct, price distribution and promo- 
tion strategies that will give a 
company a competitive advan- 
tage. Also, corporate self-ap- 
praisal, market segmentation and 
competitor evaluation. 

MK 639 Marketing Research 
and Information Systems 

Prerequisites: MK 609, QA 
604. A managerial approach to 
marketing information flow, in- 
cluding recognition of informa- 
tion needs and an overview of 
marketing research as part of an 
information system. Special at- 
tention to evaluation of research 
design and measurement meth- 
ods, effective utilization of re- 
search output and problems en- 
countered in establishing a 
marketing information system. 



126 

MK 641 MarkeHng 
Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The 
treatment of the basic decision 
problems of marketing manage- 
ment in terms of a conceptual 
framework for analysis. Con- 
sideration of the role played by 
human judgments and the math- 
ematical tools available to aid in 
these judgments in a number of 
marketing areas, notably market 
analysis, pricing decisions, ad- 
vertising decisions, promotional 
decisions and selection of distri- 
bution channels. 



MK 643 Product Management 

Prerequisite: MK 609. The 
search for new product ideas and 
their evaluation; the organiza- 
tion structure necessary to the 
development and introduction of 
new products and the manage- 
ment of a product line; the com- 
mercial aspects of product de- 
sign, packaging, labeling and 
branding; considerations in- 
volved in making product dele- 
tion decisions; and the social and 
economic effects of managing 
product innovation. 

MK 645 Distribution Strategy 

Prerequisite: MK 609. Ana- 
lysis of channel strategies, theory 
and economic justification of dis- 
tribution channels, direct and in- 
direct methods of control, behav- 
ioral states of channel members, 
costing the channel and manage- 
ment of changes in distribution. 

MK 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



MK 680 Marketing Workshop 

Centers around a structural 
model of a business firm. The 
major objective is to provide the 
student with an opportunity to 
develop managerial insights and 
skills in dealing with marketing 
problems in a competitive envi- 
rorunent. Participants are grouped 
into decision-making units (com- 
panies) and each student assumes 
the role of a marketing executive 
operating a business firm. These 
executives will be responsible for 
planning, organizing, staffing, di- 
recting and controlling their firm's 
resources. 



MK 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite; 15 graduate hours 
or permission of the instructor. 
Independent study under the su- 
f)ervision of an adviser 

MK 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

MK 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study 1. 

MK 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



MK 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis 1. 



MK 701 Seminar in Strategic 
Marketing 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 



Psychology 



P 605 Survey of Community 
Psychology 

An examination of historical 
roots and current concepts. A so- 
cial-problems approach to psy- 
chological dysfunction. Changing 
professional roles. Community or- 
ganization and human service de- 
livery; strategies of intervention 
and community change. 

P 607 Special Problems in 
Community Psychology 

Theory and practice of com- 
munity psychology with selected 
problems, populations and set- 
tings. Emphasis on community 
psychology service issues and 
problems in the Connecticut area. 

P 608 Psychometrics and 
Statistics 

Prerequisite: intermediate un- 
dergraduate course in statistics. 
Comprehensive introduction to 
fundamental conceptual and 
technical aspects of measure- 
ment and psychological descrip- 
tion of individuals. In-depth 
treatment of statistical issues 
such as advanced correlation and 
regression techniques using 
SPSSx statistical software to en- 
hance understanding of key con- 
cepts. Emphasis on application 
of measurement and statistics to 
psychological assessment in field 
settings. 

P 609 Research Methods 

Prerequisite: undergraduate 
course in statistical methods. 
Introduction to analytic concepts 
pertinent to sampling tech- 
niques, research design, variable 
control and criterion definition. 
Basic problems of measurement, 
research paradigms, sources of 
error in research interpretation, 
problems of variable identifica- 
tion and control, and considera- 
tion of the logic of inference. 



Courses 127 



P 610 Program Evaluation 

Prerequisite: P 609. A system- 
atic study of the processes 
involved in planning, implement- 
ing and evaluating organizational 
programs. Focus on action re- 
search strategies which integrate 
the entire process from planning 
to evaluation of the program. 

Practicum Seminars and 
Fieldwork (P 611-P 616): 

An apprenticeship or on-the- 
job role in an ongoing program or 
center. Emphasis on developing 
conceptualizations and insights as 
a result of involvement in the ap- 
prenticeship. Placement at a field 
site for eight to 10 hours per week. 
Weekly class meetings serve two 
purposes: to present specific theo- 
retical material and research find- 
ings appropriate to each seminar 
and to allow students to discuss 
their field training experiences. A 
comprehensive project report is re- 
quired in which each student will 
analyze and integrate fieldwork 
experience with relevant research 
and coursework. 

P 611 Individual Intervention 
Seminar 

An examination of strategies 
for providing direct helping ser- 
vices to individuals in the context 
of formal and informal networks 
of social and community support. 
Includes: the nature of the dyadic 
relationship, development of ther- 
apeutic and case management 
skills, professional ethics and su- 
pervision. Applications to a wide 
range of problems, populations 
and settings. 



P 612 Consultation Seminar 

An examination of the consul- 
tation process. Includes: the role 
of the consultant, stages of con- 
sultation, the development of 
consulting skills and politi- 
cal/ethical issues. Different ap- 
proaches to consultation practice 
are analyzed, along with their as- 
sociated interventions. 

P 613 Systems Intervention 
Seminar 

An examination of the dy- 
namics of planned, system-level 
change in the field of human ser- 
vices. The distinctive characteris- 
tics of human service organiza- 
tions are analyzed; and an 
overall intervention model is de- 
veloped, applied and discussed. 
Of special interest to those with 
responsibilities in program plan- 
ning and implementation. 

P 614 Individual Intervention 
Fieldwork 

Supervised field training in 
the provision of direct services to 
individual clients. Supervision is 
jointly provided by the field set- 
ting and the psychology depart- 
ment. Students must be available 
for at least one day per week. 
Permission of instructor is re- 
quired. 

P 615 Consultation Fieldwork 

Supervised field training in 
the development of consultation 
skills. Supervision is jointly pro- 
vided by the field setting and the 
psychology department. Stu- 
dents must be available for at 
least one day per week. Permis- 
sion of instructor is required. 



P 616 Systems Intervention 
Fieldwork 

Supervised field training in 
program planning and develop- 
ment. Supervision is jointly pro- 
vided by the field setting and the 
psychology department. Stu- 
dents must be available for at 
least one day per week. Permis- 
sion of instructor is required. 

P 619 Organizational Behavior 

Analysis of various theories of 
business and managerial behav- 
ior emphasizing the business or- 
ganization and its internal pro- 
cesses. Psychological factors in 
business and industry, including 
motivation, incentives and con- 
flict. A study of research findings 
relevant to an understanding and 
prediction of human behavior in 
organizations. 

P 620 Industrial Psychology 

Psychological theories and re- 
search applied to business and 
other organizations. Problems 
and methods in selection and 
placement, training, performance 
appraisal, criterion development 
and ergonomics. 

P 621 Behavior Modification I: 
Principles, Theories and 
Applications 

Theory and research in behav- 
ior modification. Aversive learn- 
ing, desensitization, operant con- 
ditioning. Applications in clinical 
and nonclinical settings. 



128 



P 622 Behavior Modification II: 
Advanced Theory, Assessment 
and Application in Mental 
Retardation Settings 

Prerequisites; P 621 and P637. 
Behavior modification and behav- 
ioral assessment applied to the 
mentally retarded. Use of token 
economies, cognitive behavior 
modification, problems involved 
in the use of aversive techniques, 
advanced assessment techniques. 

P 623 Psychology of the Small 
Group 

Analyses of the behavior and 
interaction of people in mutual 
gratification groups, committees, 
work groups and clubs. 

P 624 Experiential Self-Analytic 
Group 

This experiential group devel- 
ops understanding of group and 
interpersonal dynamics through 
analysis of ongoing interaction 
and improves participants' inter- 
personal abilities relevant to or- 
ganizational consulting and di- 
agnosis. Written permission to 
register for this course must be 
obtained directly from the pro- 
gram coordinator and/or in- 
structor. 

P 625 Life Span Developmental 
Psychology 

In-depth exploration of nor- 
mal and abnormal development 
through the life cycle. Emphasis 
on childhood, adolescence, adult- 
hood and later years. Develop- 
mental impact of family, neigh- 
borhood, schooling, work, 
culture. Issues of class, ethnicity, 
gender, age, etc. Applications of 
theory and research to communi- 
ty treatment and prevention. 



P 627 Attitude and Opinion 
Measurement 

Prerequisite: P 609. Examina- 
tion of modern methods of atti- 
tude and opinion measurement. 
Scale, schedule and interview 
formats. Respondent sets. Con- 
sideration of sampling problems. 

P 628 The Interview 

The interview as a tool for in- 
formation gathering, diagnoses, 
mutual decision making and be- 
havior change. Use of role play- 
ing provides the student with in- 
sights into nuances of 
interpersonal relationships. 
Applications to selection, coun- 
seling and other situations. 

P 629 Introduction to 
Psychotherapy and Counseling 

Theory, research and practice 
of psychotherapy and counsel- 
ing. Examination of the assump- 
tions, roles and processes of the 
therapeutic relationship. 

P 632 Group Dynamics and 
Group Treatment 

An exploration of the emerg- 
ing area of group dynamics. The 
structure of groups and their de- 
velopment, process interaction 
analysis, formal and informal 
groups, group psychotherapy 
and sensitivity training. 

P 634 Personality Assessment 

A critical survey of the theo- 
ries and issues of personality as- 
sessment. Includes: intelligence, 
achievement and ability assess- 
ment. Personality tests and ethi- 
cal questions associated with 
psychological testing. 



P 635 Assessment of Human 
Performance with Standardized 
Tests 

Prerequisite: P 609. Theories, 
assumptions and constraints un- 
derlying construction and appli- 
cation of standardized tests em- 
ployed in clinical, educational, 
governmental and industrial set- 
tings. Emphasis on selection of 
appropriate standardized tests 
for specific applications. 

P 636 Abnormal Psychology 

Etiological factors in psy- 
chopathology dynamics and 
classification of neuroses, 
psychophysiologic conditions, 
psychoses, personality disorders, 
organic illness, retardation and 
childhood diseases. 



P 637 Mental Retardation: 
History, Theory and Practice 

Definition of mental retarda- 
tion, criteria for legal diagnosis, 
classification systems, causes of 
retardation and syndrome de- 
scriptions. Structure of the care 
and management system in 
Connecticut, the philosophy 
governing the system, detailed 
description of the system and of 
how it is financed. 



P 638 Psychology of 
Communication and Opinion 
Change 

Characteristics of the source, 
the situation and the content of 
messages, along with other vari- 
ables influencing attitudinal mod- 
ification. Cognitive factors and 
social settings in attitude change. 

P 640 Industrial Motivation and 
Morale 

Prerequisite: P 619. The mean- 
ing of work, theories of motiva- 
tion, values and expectations, 
performance and reinforcement, 
job satisfaction and motivation, 
pay as an incentive, interventions 
to increase work motivation. 



Courses 129 



P 641 Personnel Development 
and Training 

Prerequisite: P 619 or P 620. 
Identification of skills and devel- 
opmental needs, both from an 
organizational and individual 
perspective. Techniques for as- 
sessment and development of 
skills, especially at the manageri- 
al level. Training approaches. 
Evaluation of training efforts. 

P 642 Organizational Change 
and Development 

Prerequisite: P 619. The na- 
ture of organization develop- 
ment, intervention by third-party 
consultation, change in organiza- 
tion structure and role relation- 
ships, evaluation of change ef- 
forts, participation, conformity 
and deviation. 

P 643 The Psychology of 
Conflict Management 

The constructive management 
of conflict at the individual, cor- 
porate and multicultural levels. 
Theories on the etiology of con- 
flict as well as various conflict 
resolution models. The role of 
communication and perspective- 
taking in the constructive resolu- 
tion of conflict. Students will 
learn how to manage more con- 
structively their own personal 
conflicts as well as conflicts oc- 
curring at the corporate and mul- 
ticultural levels. 

P 644 Performance 
Measurement 

Prerequisite: P 620. Theory 
and applications associated with 
performance appraisal systems in 
organizations. Emphasis is on the 
development and implementa- 
tion of valid appraisal systems. 



P 645 Seminar in Industrial/ 
Organizational Psychology 

Prerequisites: P 609 and P 619. 
An examination of the profession- 
al psychologist at work in organi- 
zations. Regular subjects include: 
measurement methods, predic- 
tion, validation, selection, train- 
ing and employee assistance 
programs, group dynamics, orga- 
nizational change, stress, perfor- 
mance appraisal. Practitioners in 
business, industry, research orga- 
nizations and government will 
provide insights into the applica- 
tion of psychological principles 
and methods. 



P 651 Organizational Behavior 
Modification 

The application of behavior 
modification techniques such as 
reinforcement, punishment, ex- 
tinction, modeling and assertive- 
ness training to organizational 
behavior management. Applica- 
tions include training, stress 
management, productivity im- 
provement, sales, waste and 
error control, absenteeism and 
safety. 

P 660 Contemporary Issues in 

Industrial/Organizational 

Psychology 

Prerequisite: 12 hours in psy- 
chology or consent of the instruc- 
tor. In-depth investigation of top- 
ical areas of concern in 
industrial/organizational psy- 
chology. Topics may include, but 
are not limited to, the impact of 
EEOC regulations on selection 
and promotion; assessment cen- 
ters; the role of the consultant in 
organizations; flextime, day care 
and other strategies to accommo- 
date family needs of employees; 
stress in work settings; women in 
management. Content will be 
stated at the time the course is 
scheduled. Students may peti- 
tion for a particular topic they 
feel would fit their academic 
goals. May be taken twice. 



P 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



P 678 Practicum I 

For students already em- 
ployed in a managerial or super- 
visory role. A job-related re- 
search project is carried out 
under faculty supervision. 

P 679 Practicum II 

A continuation of Practicum I. 



P 693 Organizational 
Internship I 

For students without experi- 
ence at the managerial or super- 
visory level. Under faculty su- 
pervision, the student engages in 
field experience in an industrial 
setting and produces a compre- 
hensive project report analyzing 
the internship experience. 

P 694 Organizational 
Internship II 

A continuation of Organiza- 
tional Internship I. 

P 695 Individual Intensive 
Study I 

Prerequisite: completion of re- 
quired courses or 24 graduate 
hours and written approval of 
department chairperson. Pro- 
vides the graduate student with 
the opportunity to delve more 
deeply into a particular area of 
study under faculty supervision. 

P 696 Individual Intensive 
Study II 

A continuation of Individual 
Intensive Study I. 



130 



P 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: completion of all 
required courses or 24 graduate 
hours and written approval of de- 
partment chairman. Periodic 
meetings and discussions of the 
individual student's progress in 
the preparation of a thesis. 

P 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



P 719 Seminar in Human 
Resources 

Enrollment limited to doctor- 
al students only. See p. 138 for 
course description. 



Public 
Administration 

PA 601 Principles of Public 
Administration 

The development, organiza- 
tion, functions and problems of 
national, state and local govern- 
mental administration. 



PA 602 Public Policy Formulation 
and Implementation 

The relationship between 
public administration and the 
formulation of public policy is 
studied. The implementation of 
public policy by administrators 
based on the politics of the ad- 
ministrator is examined in terms 
of interaction between various 
group representatives such as 
legislators, politicians, and pres- 
sure-group leaders. 

PA 604 Communities and Social 
Change 

Interactions among the com- 
munity as a social organization 
and education, police and wel- 
fare institutions within it; special 
attention to conceptual frame- 
works and current research or 
action programs that particularly 
affect minority groups. 



PA 611 Research Methods in 
Public Administration 

Prerequisite: QA 600 or equiv- 
alent. Designed to familiarize ad- 
ministrators with the tools and 
potentialities of social research, 
and to assist them in the presen- 
tation, interpretation and appli- 
cation of research data. 

PA 620 Personnel 
Administration and Collective 
Bargaining in the Public Sector 

Study of the civil service sys- 
tems in the United States and the 
state governments, including a 
systematic review of the meth- 
ods of recruitment, promotion, 
discipline, control and removal. 
Explores the effects on work rela- 
tionships of collective bargaining 
statutes which have been adopt- 
ed by legislatures. Emphasis is 
placed on collective bargaining 
case studies from state and local 
governments and hospitals. 

PA 625 Administrative Behavior 

Recommended prerequisite: 
PA 601. The problems faced by 
an administrator in dealing with 
interpersonal relationships and 
human processes. Analysis of in- 
dividual and group behavior in 
various governmental and busi- 
ness settings to determine the 
administrative action for the pro- 
motion of desired work perfor- 
mance. Emphasis given to the 
public sector. Participation in ac- 
tual problem situation discus- 
sions and case studies. 



PA 630 Fiscal Management for 
Local Government 

Recommended prerequisite: 
PA 601 . The problems faced by a 
survey of the essential principles 
of governmental accounting, 
budgeting, cost accounting and 
financial reporting. The various 
operating funds, bonded debt, 
fixed assets, investments, classifi- 
cation of revenue and expendi- 
tures, general property taxes and 
interfund relationships. 

PA 632 Public Finance and 
Budgeting 

Recommended prerequisite: 
PA 601. State and local expendi- 
ture patterns, state and local rev- 
enue sources, income taxation at 
the state and local levels, excise 
taxation, sales taxation, taxation 
of capital and the property tax. 
Emphasis on fiscal and economic 
aspects of federalism and federal 
state fiscal coordination. The role 
of the budget in the determina- 
tion of policy, in administrative 
integration, in control of govern- 
ment operations. 

PA 641 Financial Management 
of Health Care Organizations 

Theory and application of fi- 
nancial planning and manage- 
ment techniques in health care 
organizations. Emphasis on fi- 
nancial decision making and on 
preparation of short-term and 
long-term cash, capital, revenue 
and expense budgets and finan- 
cial plans to meet the require- 
ments of HCFA and other third 
parties. 

PA 642 Health Care Delivery 
Systems 

A contemporary analysis of 
health care delivery systems in 
the U.S. Financial, cost, econom- 
ic, political and organizational is- 
sues will be discussed. 



Coxirses 131 



PA 643 Health and Institutional 
Planning 

Designed to develop skills 
and understanding of the dy- 
namics of health and social plan- 
ning processes with respect to 
consumer demand, national and 
local health goals and the opti- 
mal location of facilities, services 
and manpower. 

PA 644 Administration of 
Programs and Services for the 
Aged 

The structure, function and 
properties of publicly and pri- 
vately funded programs and ser- 
vice organizations providing 
health services to the aged. The 
economic, political, legal and so- 
cial issues which affect the ad- 
ministration of human service 
organizations will be studied, 
with emphasis on administration 
of health care services. 



PA 645 Health Care Economics 
and Finance 

Recommended prerequisite: 
PA 641. Integration of account- 
ing, economics, finance, budget- 
ing and health insurance princi- 
ples, concepts and analytic tools 
which are essential to the deci- 
sion-making processes of health 
care organizations. 

PA 646 Organization and 
Management of Long-Term 
Care Facilities 

Examines the variety of sys- 
tems providing long-term care 
services for the aged. Special 
concentration on the ways vari- 
ous facilities are managed and 
on the impact of state bylaws. 
Case studies illustrate decision 
making and problem solving 
within health institutions. 



PA 647 Alternative Health Care 
Delivery Systems 

A survey of nontraditional 
approaches to health care. 
Includes: cost shifting, cost shar- 
ing, the development of outpa- 
tient facilities and the impact of 
cost containment regulation in a 
systems-oriented framework. 

PA 648 Contemporary Issues in 
Health Care 

Gives health care profession- 
als a broad view of current topics 
in their field. The students will 
view current videotapes, work 
on case studies, participate in 
class exercises and present sever- 
al reports. Current articles illus- 
trate the issues under discussion. 



PA 650 Administrative Law 

A search for principles and cri- 
teria against which public interest 
can be balanced with private 
right in the changing patterns of 
government, with particular ref- 
erence to the American system. 

PA 660 Urban Planning: Theory 
and Practice 

Explores the concept of physi- 
cal planning within the urban 
developmental framework. The 
function of planning in its rela- 
tionship to the environment. 
Comprehensive planning wath its 
many ramifications involving the 
various sections of our society. 
Methods for analyzing problems 
as well as design methods for 
problem solving. 

PA 661 Problems of 
Metropolitan Areas 

Analysis of the problems of 
government and administration 
arising from the population pat- 
terns and physical and social 
structures of contemporary 
metropolitan communities. 



PA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



PA 680 Seminar in Public 
Administration 

Exact material to be covered 
will be announced. 

PA 681 Long-Term Health Care 
Internship I 

Prerequisites: PA 641, PA 646. 
First of two state-required intern- 
ships required to be eligible to 
take the State of Connecticut li- 
censing examination in long- 
term care administration. Course 
is composed of a 450-hour nurs- 
ing home internship. 

PA 682 Long-Term Health Care 
Internship II 

A continuation of Long-Term 
Health Care Internship I. 

PA 690 Research Seminar 

Recommended prerequisite: 
PA 611. Requirements include a 
major independent research 
study and participation in an in- 
tegrative seminar on research 
and its uses in public administra- 
tion. 



PA 691 Research Project 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate 
hours and permission of the pub- 
lic administration graduate pro- 
gram coordinator. Independent 
study for advanced graduate stu- 
dents on selected problems in 
public administration. May be 
taken more than once. 



PA 692 Readings in Public 
Administration 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours or permission of the in- 
structor 



PA 693 Public Administration 
Internship 

Prerequisites: 15 graduate 
hours and permission of the pub- 
lic administration graduate pro- 
gram coordinator. A supervised 
work experience in a cooperating 
public service agency. Students 
must be available for at least one 
day per week. 

PA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

PA 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study 1. 

PA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



PA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Philosophy 



Physics 



PH 670 Selected Topics- 
Physics 

Prerequisite: permission of 
the instructor. A study of select- 
ed topics of particular interest to 
students and instructor. Course 
may be taken more than once. 



PL 601 Business Ethics 

Problems include the nature 
of the corporation, the values of 
business activity, corporate social 
responsibility, the proper rela- 
tionship between the corporation 
and government, employee 
rights and related matters. 
Problems are analyzed using the 
most important current theories 
of social and economic justice. 



Political Science 

PS 601 Constitutional Law 

A study of the judicial process 
and its relation to the 
Constitution and the political 
system in the United States. 
Examines the role of the 
Supreme Court in shaping judi- 
cial review, federalism, civil 
rights and liberties, equal protec- 
tion and due process. 

PS 602 Civil Liberties and 
Rights 

An analysis of civil liberties, 
civil rights, due process and equal 
protection of the law. An exami- 
nation of the role of the public of- 
ficial in the protection, denial or 
abridgment of the constitutional 
and legal rights of individuals. 

PS 603 International Law 

A study of the role of interna- 
tional law in the modern state 
system with particular reference 
to individuals; territorial juris- 
diction; law of the sea, air and 
space; and the development of 
law through international orga- 
nizations. 



PS 604 Human Rights and the 
Law 

An examination of the devel- 
opment of the international and 
national laws establishing human 
rights, the laws of war, war/ 
criminality, crimes against hu- 
manity and the application of the 
universal declaration of human 
rights, of the Helsinki Accords, 
and of the concept of the individ- 
ual as the basis of law. 



PS 605 Criminal Law 

Scope, purpose, definition 
and classification of criminal law. 
Offense against the person; habi- 
tation and occupancy. Offenses 
against property and other of- 
fenses. Special defenses. Empha- 
sis on the Connecticut penal 
code. 



PS 606 Advanced International 
Relations 

Basic elements of international 
life relevant to the growth of a 
stable and peaceful global politi- 
cal-economic system. Includes: 
power, diplomacy, law, trade, aid, 
monetary affairs, multinational 
corporations and differing geo- 
graphical and cultural character- 
istics. 



PS 608 The Legislative Process 

An analysis of the legislative 
process in the American political 
system. Stress on legislative poli- 
tics in state and local govern- 
ment. Includes: legislative func- 
tions, selection and recruitment 
of legislative candidates, legisla- 
tive role orientations, the legisla- 
tive socialization process, the 
committee system, the legislators 
and their constituencies, legis- 
lative lobbyists, legislative deci- 
sion making, legislative-execu- 
tive relations and legislative 
organization and procedures. 



Courses 133 



PS 610 Legal Methods I 

A study of procedure and 
process of the law as it apphes in 
the American system and an in- 
troduction to legal research and 
writing. 

PS 612 Contracts, Torts and the 
Practice of Law 

An introduction to the most 
important components of private 
law, that is, contracts, torts and 
civil procedure and their applica- 
tion to business, government and 
individuals. 



PS 615 Jurisprudence 

The general philosophical 
framework for the law. Includes 
the background and develop- 
ment of the common law, sources 
of the law and the court system. 
Special problems in Anglo- 
American jurisprudence are re- 
viewed. 

PS 616 Urban Government 

An examination of the urban 
political system. Stress on the po- 
litical aspects of urban govern- 
ment structures. Includes: formal 
and informal decision making in 
urban government, community 
power structures, types of urban 
government structures, the poli- 
tics of intergovernmental rela- 
tions and the politics of servicing 
the urban environment (social 
services, planning agencies, edu- 
cation, housing, transportation, 
health, pollution control and ecol- 
ogy, revenue sharing, public safe- 
ty, neighborhood corporations, 
etc.). 



PS 617 Law, Science and Ethics 

The intersection of law, sci- 
ence and ethics in a variety of 
contexts, including experimenta- 
tion with human subjects, 
psychosurgery, genetic engineer- 
ing, organ transplants, abortion 
and the right to die. 



PS 619 Legal Protection of 
Computer Software 

Prerequisite: CS 602 or equiv- 
alent. The legal principles in- 
volved in the protection of pro- 
prietary computer software and 
hardware by means of patents, 
copyrights and trade secrets. 
Consideration of software licens- 
ing and employer-employee rela- 
tionships involving creative 
work. (See also CS 619.) 

PS 625 Transnational Legal 
Structures 

An introduction to the basic 
structure of legal systems in other 
countries, their relationship to 
Anglo-American law and their 
contextual development. Special 
topics include: legal status of for- 
eign and multinational corpora- 
tions, rights and responsibilities of 
aliens, protections for investors, 
expropriation and procedural due 
process. 

PS 626 Decision Making in the 
Political Process 

An in-depth study of decision 
making in the American system 
with special emphasis on the var- 
ious types of mechanisms: execu- 
tive, legislative, judicial, bureau- 
cratic, organizational and 
military. The influence of intelli- 
gence, economic and psychologi- 
cal factors and social pressure on 
decisions and decision makers 
will be examined. 



PS 628 Change and Government 

A study of the major process- 
es of change and their conse- 
quences for the functioning of 
government. Concentrates on 
changes that may occur through 
violence, evolution or technolo- 
gy and which may alter the effec- 
tive operation of government. 



PS 633 The Political Process and 
the Aged 

A study of the political pro- 
cess as it relates to the aged. 
Governmental decision making 
on federal, state and local levels 
including legislation and its im- 
plications. 

PS 635 Law and Public Health 

A course for the civil servant 
or health professional concerned 
with the laws relating to the pub- 
lic health at the federal, state and 
local level as well as the practical 
administration of those laws. 



PS 640 Law and Education 

An examination of the legal 
and educational issues arising 
from factors such as EEO, stu- 
dents' rights, student financing 
and the relationships between 
schools and government. 

PS 641 The Politics of the World 
Economy 

An examination of the global 
politico-economic system and 
the challenges facing world 
diplomacy. Multinational corpo- 
rations and political structures 
designed to coordinate global 
policies for the monetary and 
trade systems, international or- 
ganizations and their impact on 
Third World development and 
problems facing industrialized 
nations analyzed. 

PS 645 Government and the 
Industrial Sector 

The various impacts of govern- 
ment regulation on the corporate 
sector and the major legal and reg- 
ulatory requirements affecting 
business and industry. 



134 



PS 655 Conflict Resolution 

Essential features and meth- 
ods available within the legal 
system to resolve disputes, in- 
cluding the uses of lav*', equity, 
administrative agencies, bureau- 
cracies, arbitration, mediation, 
special commissions and private 
self-help. Applicability of those 
methods to various types of dis- 
putes and the choice of law in in- 
stances when no single rule may 
govern in a federal system. 

PS 670 Selected Topics 

A study of items of special in- 
terest may include: First Amend- 
ment problems, energy and the 
law, law and the environment, 
labor legislation and the law, law 
and commercial paper and stock 
issues. May be taken more than 
once. 

PS 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

PS 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study 1. 



Quantitative 
Analysis 

QA 600 Quantitative Analysis 

Basic mathematics for solving 
economic and business prob- 
lems. Includes: algebra review, 
equations and inequalities, 
graphs, exponential and loga- 
rithmic functions, an introduc- 
tion to matrix algebra. No credit. 



QA 604 Probability and 
Statistics 

Prerequisite: QA 600 or equiv- 
alent. An introduction to busi- 
ness statistics. Includes: data 
analysis and presentation; fre- 
quency distributions; probability 
theory; probability distributions, 
decision making under uncer- 
tainty; sampling and statistical 
inference; hypothesis testing; t, 
chi-square and F tests; introduc- 
tion to regression, correlation and 
analysis of variance. 

QA 605 Advanced Statistics 

A continuation of QA 604. 
Includes: simple regression and 
correlation, multiple regression, 
analysis of variance, the general 
linear model and an introduction 
to time series analysis and fore- 
casting techniques. 

QA 606 Advanced Management 
Science 

Prerequisites: IE 601, QA 604, 
QA 605. An examination, from a 
management viewpoint, of the 
scope of applicability of the 
methods and models developed 
in IE 601 Introduction to Opera- 
tions Research /Management Sci- 
ence, QA 604 Probability and 
Statistics, and QA 605 Advanced 
Statistics. Includes: parametric 
programming and economic in- 
terpretation of the dual LP prob- 
lem, marginal costs and rev- 
enues, shadow prices, 
opportunity costs, incremental 
costs, costs of deviation from op- 
timal solution point(s) and loca- 
tion or construction of desirable 
alternate optimal solutions. 



QA 607 Forecasting 

Prerequisite: QA 605 or per- 
mission of the instructor. A wide 
range of forecasting methods use- 
ful to students and practitioners 
of management, economics and 
other disciplines requiring fore- 
casting. Focus on quantitative 
techniques of forecasting and wtU 
include smoothing and decompo- 
sition approaches, multiple re- 
gression and econometric models, 
and autoregressive/moving aver- 
age methods including general- 
ized adaptive filtering and Box- 
Jenkins methodology. 

QA 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. Courses may 
cover decision science methods 
such as experimental design, 
nonparametrics, data analysis 
with SPSS, Bayesian decision 
theory and simulation. May be 
taken more than once. 



QA 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours or permission of the in- 
structor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 
viser. 



QA 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

QA 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study 1. 

QA 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



QA 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Courses 135 



Occupational Safety 
and Health 
Management 

SH 602 Safety Organization and 
Administration 

Intensive study of the occupa- 
tional safety and health field as it 
currently exists. History and 
growth of industrial safety. Moti- 
vational and psychological as- 
pects of accident prevention. 
Legal aspects of safety, including 
worker compensation and state 
and federal regulations. Engi- 
neering needs. Development of 
voluntary standard systems. Fire 
prevention, industrial hygiene 
and future directions. 



SH 605 Industrial Safety 
Engineering 

An analysis of the major physi- 
cal hazards in industrial work and 
the attendant safety practices em- 
ployed to eliminate the hazardous 
condition or minimize the likeli- 
hood and extent of injury. Includes 
the hazards associated with ma- 
chinery, combustion, electricity, 
material handling and fire. 

SH 608 Industrial Hygiene 
Practices 

Prerequisite: introductory 
chemistry. Recognition of the 
magnitude and extent of the 
health hazards characteristic of 
industrial work. An evaluation of 
the danger, the control of the haz- 
ard and the protection of the 
worker. 



SH 611 OSH Research Methods 
and Techniques 

The students and OSH faculty 
will meet once a week throughout 
the trimester. The student will se- 
lect a topic directly related to oc- 
cupational safety and health, con- 
duct a literature search, do a 
research project and prepare and 
defend a mini-thesis. 



SH 615 Toxicology 

Prerequisite: introductory 
chemistry. Introduction to envi- 
ronmental and industrial toxicol- 
ogy; toxicologic evaluation; the 
mode of entry, absorption and 
distribution of toxicants; the me- 
tabolism and excretion of toxic 
substances; interactions between 
substances in toxicology; toxico- 
logic data extrapolation; particu- 
lates; solvents and metals; agri- 
cultural chemicals — insecticides 
and pesticides; toxicology of plas- 
tics; gases; food additives; plant 
and animal toxins; carcinogens, 
mutagens and teratogens. (See 
also EN 615.) 



SH 620 Occupational Safety and 
Health Law 

A survey of the major federal 
occupational safety and health 
laws with an emphasis on the 
Occupational Safety and Health 
Act of 1970 as well as state work- 
ers' compensation laws. Studies 
focus on the administration of the 
laws, their major provisions, the 
enforcement process as well as 
the federal/state interrelation- 
ships in this milieu. 

SH 630 Product Safety and 
Liability 

An investigation into the legal 
pitfalls and the human concerns 
inherent in the marketing and con- 
sumption of goods: sellers respon- 
sibility, product liability, insurance, 
labeling requirements. The 
Consumer Product Safety Act and 
related acts, the procedures for 
minimizing legal risk and maxi- 
mizing human safety and health. 

SH 660 Industrial Ventilation 

A thorough study of industrial 
ventilation systems including the- 
ory of design, air pollution con- 
trol, life-cycle costs, automatic 
controls, instrumentation, rele- 
vant codes and standards, and the 
evaluation of system perfor- 
mance. 



SH 661 Microcomputers in 
Occupational Safety and Health 

Introductory course on using 
microcomputers in occupational 
safety and health. Instruction in 
techniques used for data process- 
ing, statistical analysis, interfac- 
ing with instrumentation and 
linking with mini- and main- 
frame computers. 

SH 665 Occupational Safety and 
Health Measurements 

Theory and practice of current 
methods and techniques applica- 
ble to occupational safety and 
health. Experiments in ventila- 
tion, nonionizing radiation, mea- 
surement of airborne contami- 
nants, noise and heat stress. 
Instruction on statistical analysis 
of safety data. 

SH 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



SH 690 Research Project I 

Prerequisite: permission of 
the instructor. Independent 
study under the supervision of 
an adviser. 1 -3 credits. 



SH 691 Research Project II 

A continuation of Research 
Project 1. 1-3 credits. 

SH 693 OSH Internship I 

Coordinated with local indus- 
try or governmental agencies 
such as OSHA, NIOSH and EPA. 
Practical problems in occupa- 
tional safety or industrial hy- 
giene and approaches to solving 
these problems under the super- 
vision of a practicing profession- 
al. At the end of the project a re- 
port will be prepared by the 
student and will be presented to 
the OSH faculty for grade evalu- 
ation. 1-3 credits. 



136 

SH 694 OSH Internship II 

A continuation of Internship I. 
1-3 credits. 



SH 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of individ- 
ual study under the supervision 
of a member of the faculty. 1-3 
credits. 



SH 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study 1. 1-3 credits. 

SH 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



SH 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Sociology 



so 601 Minority Group 
Relations 

An interdisciplinary survey of 
minority groups in the United 
States with special reference to 
ethnic, religious and racial fac- 
tors that influence interaction. 

SO 610 Urban Sociology 

Prerequisite: PA 604. The 
problems of urban growth and 
development. Residential pat- 
terns together with the physical 
development of cities and their 
redevelopment. An examination 
of the people and their relation- 
ships to the environment. 



SO 620 Sociology of 
Bureaucracy 

A study of some of the classic 
conceptualizations of bureaucra- 
cy and their relevance to the 
structure and functioning of 
American economic and govern- 
mental institutions. Gives stu- 
dents informational and experi- 
ential resources with which they, 
as planners and managers, can 
improve their abilities to make 
effective policy decisions. 

SO 641 Death and Suicide 

In-depth analysis of suicide. 
Traditional theories of suicide are 
analyzed regarding the psycholog- 
ical approach as well as the demo- 
graphic and group analysis of so- 
ciology. The goal of the course is 
both academic and practical, 
stressing community application. 

SO 649 Seminar in Health and 
Social Policy 

Analysis of the legal, political, 
social, economic and organiza- 
tional factors in planning and 
providing health care services 
with emphasis on policy formu- 
lation and implementation. Cur- 
rent health pohcy issues. 

SO 651 Social Gerontology 

Basic introduction to the field 
of gerontology. Discusses the his- 
tory and definition of the field, 
the contributions of academic dis- 
ciplines to the field, various per- 
ception of aging; explores the 
basic theories, problems and 
prospects of gerontology. 

SO 670 Selected Topics 

A study of selected issues of 
particular interest to the students 
and instructor. May be taken 
more than once. 



SO 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 



SO 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 

SO 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of a thesis. 



SO 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Tourism & Travel 
Administration 

TT 600 The Tourism Industry 

An introductory course de- 
signed to acquaint graduate stu- 
dents with the basic principles, 
practices and philosophies of the 
tourism industry. Includes: histo- 
ry and organization of tourism, 
economics of tourism, tourism re- 
search and forecasting and plan- 
ning and development for the 
travel industry. No credit. 

TT 610 Legal Aspects of the 
Travel Industry 

Prerequisite: TT 600 or equiv- 
alent. Provides students with 
knowledge of the legal issues 
that affect the rights and respon- 
sibilities of clients, carriers, sup- 
pliers and operators in the travel 
industry. Includes: travel agen- 
cy/client relationships and con- 
tracts; business practices and lia- 
bilities of land, sea and air 
carriers; legal requirements and 
personnel issues in the purchase, 
ownership and sale of travel 
agencies; and the impact of an- 
titrust laws on the travel agent 
and the travel industry. 



Courses 137 



TT 620 Deregulation: A New 
Era in the Travel Industry 

Prerequisite: TT 600 or equiv- 
alent. Reviews the events lead- 
ing to the Airline Deregulation 
Act of 1978 and subsequent 
deregulation rulings in the trav- 
el industry. The impact of dereg- 
ulation on the industry will be 
examined. Includes: travel agen- 
cy marketing and distribution 
changes, evolution of regional 
and trunk carriers, low-cost car- 
riers and their impact on the in- 
dustry, corporate changes and 
mergers. 

TT 625 Travel Industry Human 
Resources Development 

Prerequisite: TT 600 or equiv- 
alent. Personnel functions in the 
travel industry examined, in- 
cluding recruitment and selec- 
tion of personnel for positions in 
a service industry, policies and 
procedures, compensation, re- 
tention and motivation. Study of 
human resources development 
including design of employee 
training programs in sales and 
communication skills and devel- 
opment of management skills for 
successful employee relations. 

TT 630 International Tourism 
and Travel 

Prerequisite: TT 600 or equiv- 
alent. Study of the impact of 
tourism nationally and interna- 
tionally, including the political 
power of tourism, the contribu- 
tions of tourism to the economy 
worldwide and the sociocultural 
aspects of tourism. Examines na- 
tional and international tourism 
policies as well as the interna- 
tional organizations that provide 
assistance to the tourism Indus- 
try. 



TT 635 Corporate Travel 

Prerequisite: TT 600 or equiv- 
alent. The emergence and impact 
of the travel management sys- 
tems handling corporate travel 
accounts. Knowledge and skills 
necessary for the development, 
acquisition, management, ser- 
vice and maintenance of com- 
mercial, corporate travel ac- 
counts and clients. The 
consolidation of business travel 
arrangements and the benefits of 
travel management corporations 
and systems. 

TT 660 Comparative Tourism 

Prerequisite: TT 600 or equiva- 
lent. A detailed study of tourism 
development within mainstream 
destination countries. An in-depth 
evaluation of selected foreign 
countries in relationship to tour- 
ism, and their political, geograph- 
ical, agricultural, religious, cli- 
matic and socioeconomic status. 



TT 670 Selected Topics 

An in-depth examination of 
topics of particular interest to 
the students and the instructor. 
May be taken more than once. 

TT 690 Research Project 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours and permission of the in- 
structor. Independent study 
under the supervision of an ad- 
viser. 



TT 695 Independent Study I 

A planned program of indi- 
vidual study under the supervi- 
sion of a member of the faculty. 

TT 696 Independent Study II 

A continuation of Indepen- 
dent Study I. 



TT 698 Thesis I 

Prerequisite: 15 graduate 
hours. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual 
student's progress in the prepa- 
ration of a thesis. 



TT 699 Thesis II 

A continuation of Thesis I. 



Doctoral Program 
Course Descriptions 

EC 703 Forecasting and 
Econometrics 

Prerequisites: MG 701 and 
MG 702. Contemporary use of 
advanced forecasting and econo- 
metric techniques in modern 
corporations and in 

nonprofit /public sector organi- 
zations. Computer-aided model- 
ing will be stressed within the 
framework of corporate plan- 



EC 704 Public and Private 
Policy Interfaces 

Descriptions of the varied 
and complex interfaces and in- 
terdependence between public 
and private organizations. Roles 
of regulatory agencies and the 
resultant responses of regulated 
organizations. 

FI 701 Seminar in Financial 
Policy 

Review of contemporary 
thought relevant to financial pol- 
icy formulation within organiza- 
tions. Analysis of capital mar- 
kets, regulation and resource 
availability in the context of con- 
tributors to overall corporate 
policy and strategic decision 
making. 



138 



IE 704 Seminar in Management 
and Control Systems 

Topical coverage of contempo- 
rary management information 
systems and their roles in corpo- 
rate planning and control func- 
tions. Resource control systems 
are reviewed in conjunction with 
budgeting, cost accounting, orga- 
nizational communication and 
managerial decision making. 

MG 701 and MG 702 Research 
Design I and II 

Prerequisite: MG 701 for MG 
702. These two courses are de- 
signed to provide students with 
basic training in research. Partici- 
pants will have ample opportu- 
nities to examine relationships 
among ideas, question the basic 
assumptions, learn methodology 
and measurements of variables, 
test hypotheses and interpret the 
findings. Major focus is also on 
the application of the advanced 
statistics topics (including design 
of experiments, factor analysis 
and nonparametric analysis) to 
public and private management 
problems. Intensive training, 
guidance and experience in li- 
brary research, as well as statisti- 
cal computing by SPSS and other 
computer statistical package pro- 
grams, will be provided. 



MG 737 Seminar in 
Management 

Review of the state of the art 
of the management process. 
Topical coverage of contempo- 
rary management theories, 
trends, developments, successes 
and failures. 



MG 738 Policy and Strategic 
Decision Making 

Intensive review of policy for- 
mulation and strategic decision 
making in large and small orga- 
nizations, with emphasis on pri- 
vate corporations. Interfaces 
with government, special inter- 
est, labor and foreign organiza- 
tions are incorporated into the 
overall policy review process. 

MK 701 Seminar in Strategic 
Marketing 

Role of marketing and mar- 
keting research in the develop- 
ment of organizational policy 
and corporate decision making. 



F 719 Seminar in Human 
Resoiuces 

Review of contemporary re- 
search relevant to the manage- 
ment process in organizations of 
all types. Topics include specific 
contributions from behavioral 
science, organizational develop- 
ment, industrial relations and 
group dynamics. 

MG 801 Dissertation I 

Prerequisite: successful com- 
pletion of the written and oral 
doctoral comprehensive exami- 
nations. Periodic meetings and 
discussions of the individual stu- 
dent's progress in the prepara- 
tion of the doctoral dissertation. 



MG 802 Dissertation II 

Continuation of Dissertation I. 



MG 803 Dissertation III 

Continuation of Dissertahon D. 



MG 804 Dissertation IV 

Continuation of Dissertation 111. 



141 



BOARD, ADMINISTRATION 
AND FACULTY 



Board of Governors 



Henry E. Bartels, former vice-president, Insilco Corporation 

James Q. Bensen, former resident manager, Bethlehem Steel Corporation 

William I. Bergman, former president, Richardson-Vicks, U.S.A. 

Roland M. Bixler, president, J-B-T Instruments, Inc. 

Norman I. Botwinik, chairman; Botwinik Associates 

Jessie M. Godley Bradley, former assistant superintendent. New Haven Public Schools 

William C. Bruce, attorney at law, Pepe and Hazard 

Thomas J. Cahill, executive vice president. Bank of New Haven 

Richard F. Connell, assistant vice president, employee benefits division, Aetna Life and 

Casualty 
Orest T. Dubno, executive director, Connecticut Housing Finance Authority 
Robert D. Dugan, full-time faculty representative 
Joseph F. Duplinsky, honorary chairman of the board. Blue Cross & Blue Shield of 

Connecticut 
John E. Echlin, Jr., former account executive, Paine Webber 
Robert L. Fiscus, president and chief financial officer. United Illuminating 
Raymond A. Fletcher, general manager, information systems and technology. Southern New 

England Telephone 
John A. Frey, president, Hershey Metal Products, Inc. 
Murray Gerber, president, Prototype & Plastic Mold Company, Inc. 
Stanley A. Gniazdowski, alumni president/ representative 
Robert M. Gordon, former president, Raybestos-Manhattan, Inc. 
Mary A. Hart, alumni representative 
Phillip Kaplan, president. University of New Haven 
George E. Laursen, former vice president — manufacturing. Health & Beauty Division, 

Chesebrough-Pond's, Inc. 
Robert J. Lyons, chairman of the board. The Bilco Company 
Jean C. McAndrews, director. Grassroots Program, Volvo International 
Alexander W. Nicholson, Jr., chief executive officer. Statewide Insurance Group 
Flemming L. Norcott, Jr., appellate court justice 
Herbert H. Pearce, vice clwirman; chairman of the board & chief executive officer, H. Pearce 

Company 
Joyce O. Resnikoff, primary trustee/manager, Olde Mistick Village, and secretary/treasurer, 

MaU Incorporated 



142 

Catherine D. Robinson, former Title IV consultant. State Department of Education 

Francis A. Schneiders, president, Enthone — OMl Inc. 

Fenmore R. Seton, retired president, Seton Name Plate Corporation 

Edwin A. Sylvia, adjunct faculty representative 

Leon J. Talalay, retired, B.F. Goodrich Company 

R. C. Taylor III, president, Tay-Mac Corporation 

George R. Tieman, secretary; attorney at law^ 

Cheever Tyler, attorney at law, Wiggin & Dana 

Elisabeth van Dyke, full-time faculty representative 

Robert F. Wilson, former chairman of the board, Wallace International Silversmiths, Inc. 

Representatives of the Day Student Government, Evening Student Government and Graduate Student Council serve one-year 
terms on the Board of Governors. 

Administration 

Office of the President 

PhiUip Kaplan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., president 
Lorraine A. Guidone, assistant to the president 
Lucy Wendland, executive secretary 

Office of the Provost 

Alexis N. Sommers, B.M.E., M.S., Ph.D., provost 
James W. Uebelacker, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., vice provost 
Carohne A. Dinegar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., associate provost 
Brenda R. Williams, B.A., M.A.Ed., Ph.D., assistant provost 

Office of the Vice President for Finance 

Frederick G. Fischer, B.S., C.P.A., vice president for finance, secretary to the university 
Marjorie C. Montague, B.S., M.B.A., controller, assistant secretary to the university 

School of Arts and Sciences 

Joseph B. Chepaitis, A.B., M.A., Ph.D., dean 

School of Business 

Marilou McLaughlin, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., dean 

Thomas Katsaros, B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., associate dean 

Ruth Gonchar Brennan, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., director, executive M.B.A. program 



Administration 143 

School of Engineering 

M. Jerry Kenig, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., M.A., Ph.D., dean 

John Sarris, B.A., M.S., Ph.D., associate dean 

B. Badri Saleeby, B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Ph.D., associate dean for Southeastern Connecticut 

Richard H. Strauss, B.A., M.P.A., assistant dean 

School of Hotel, Restaurant and Tourism Administration 

Warren J. Smith, B.S., M.B.A., acting dean 

School of Professional Studies and Continuing Education 

WilHam S. Gere, Jr., B.M.E., M.S.I.E., M.S., Ph.D., acting dean 

Dany J. Washington, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., associate dean 

John F. O'Brien, B.S., M.B.A., senior director, UNH in Southeastern Connecticut 

Graduate School Administration 

Office of the Dean 

William S. Gere, Jr., B.M.E., M.S.I.E., M.S., Ph.D., dean 
Jane F. Joseph, executive secretary 

Graduate Admissions and Operations 

Joseph F. Spellman, B.S., M.A., director 
Letitia H. Bingham, B.A., M.A., assistant director 
Michaela H. Apotrias, administrative secretary 
Doreen J. Kasarda, admissions information 
Sybil J. Merritt, international student admissions 

Graduate Records 

Virginia D. Klump, registrar for graduate records 
Alice Redding, administrative secretary 
Alexis Zuchinsky, records information 



144 



Departments 

Admissions 

Athletics 

Buildings and Grounds 

Business Office 

Career Development/ 

Cooperative Education 
Computer Center 
Continuing Education 
Counseling 
Development and 

Alumni Relations 



Students with Disabilities 
Equal Opportunity 
Financial Aid 
Health Services 



Institute of 

Computer Studies 
International Services 
Library 

Minority Affairs 
Personnel 
Public Relations 
Residential Life 
Security 
Student Records 

Student Services 

Veterans' Affairs 



Director (vacant) 

William M. Leete, M.Ed., director 
Justin T. McManus, director of facilities 
Frances A. MacMillan, bursar 

Martha Woodruff, B.S., M.A., M.S., acting director 
Albert C. Leiper, B.A., M.S., director 
Dany J. Washington, B.S., M.A., Ph.D., director 
Deborah Everhart, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., director 

Nikki de L. Lindberg, director 

Jane Cooper, B.S., associate director, corporate and foundation 

relations 
Patricia J. Rooney, R.S.M., B.A., M.A., director of alumni relations 
Beverly I. CoUings, B. A., assistant director of alumni relations 
Melissa Coleman, B.A., grants officer 
David J. Kmetz, B.A., M.A., director 
Caroline A. Dinegar, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., associate provost 
Jane C. Sangeloty, B.A., director 
Stephen Brenner, M.D., university physician 
John Christoforo, M.D., university physician 
Phyllis Landry, R.N., B.S., assistant director 
Paula Cappuccia, R.N., everiing nurse 

Richard B. Jones, B.S., M.S., Ph.D., director 

Lisa Carraretto, B.A., M.S., director 

Director (vacant) 

Hanko Dobi, B.A., M.L.S., associate director 

John M. Fryer, B.A., M.S., director 

David Hennessey, A.B., M.B.A., director 

Antoinette Blood, B.A., director 

Rebecca D. Johnson, B.A., M.A., director 

Donald R. Scott, A.S., B.S., chief 

Joseph Macionus, B.S., M.P.A., university registrar 

Nancy A. Carroll, B.S., M.S., associate registrar 

James E. Martin, Jr., B.A., M.Ed., Ph.D., dean 

Rebecca D. Johnson, B.A., M.A., associate dean for student life 

Karen E. Flynn, B.A., coordinator 



Faculty 145 



FACULTY 



Adams, William R., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., B.S., M.S., University of New Haven 
Aliane, Bouzid, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., Ecole Polytechnique d'Alger; M.S.E.E., Ph.D., Polytechnic Institute of New York 
Allen, Jerry L., Professor, Communication 

B.S., Southeast State University; M.S., Ph.D., Southern Illinois University 
Baeder, Robert W., Professor, Management and Marketing 

B.B.A., Case Western Reserve University; M.B.A., Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Barratt, Carl, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.Sc, Bristol University; Ph.D., Cambridge University 
Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., Cairo Uruversity; M.A.Sc, University of Toronto; Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 
Bell, Srilekha, Professor, English 

B.A., M.A., University of Madras, India; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Bentivegna, Beverly A., Assistant Professor, Dietetics 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 
Berman, Peter I., Professor, Finance 

A.B., Cornell University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 
Boardman, Susan, Assistant Professor, Psychology 

B.S., St. Lawrence University; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Bockley, William R., Professor, Management 

V.E., Northeastern University; LL.B., LaSalle University; M.B.A., Babson College; Ph.D., 

Boston College 
Boman, Margaret A., Instructor, Mathematics 

B.S., Kent State University; M.S., John Carroll University 
Broderick, Gregory P., Associate Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Northeastern University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin 
Brody, Robert P., Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.B.A., University of Chicago; D.B. A., Harvard University 
Carriuolo, Nancyanne, Professor, English 

B.A., M.S., State University of New York College at Brockport; Ph.D., State University of 

New York at Buffalo 
Carriuolo, Ralf E., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Yale University; M.M., Hartt School of Music; Ph.D., Wesleyan University 
Carson, George R., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.C.E., City College, New York; M.S.C.E., Columbia University 
Celotto, Albert, Instructor of Music, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.M., Western Connecticut State University; M.M., Indiana State University 



146 

Chandra, Satish, Professor, Law and International Business 

B.A., University of Delhi; M.A., Delhi School of Economics; LL.B., Lucknow Law School, 

India; LL.M., J.S.D., Yale University 
Chepaitis, Joseph B., Professor, History 

A.B., Loyola College; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Coleman, Charles N., Assistant Professor, Public Administration 

B.A., University of Maryland; M.P.A., West Virginia University 
Collura, Michael A., Associate Professor, Chemical Engineering 

B.S., Lafayette College; M.S., Ph.D., Lehigh University 
Corprew, James C, Associate Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.S., M.B.A., Old Dominion University; M.S., Georgia State University; Ph.D., Mississippi 

State University 
Davis, Wesley, Lecturer, EngHsh 

B.S., M.A., Southern Connecticut State University 
Desio, Peter J., Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire 
Dichele, Ernest M., Professor, Accounting and Tax Law 

B.S., University of New Haven; J.D., Boston College Law School; LL.M., Boston University 

School of Law; C.P.A. 
Dinegar, Caroline A., Professor, PoHtical Science 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Downe, Edward A., Associate Professor, Finance 

B.A., BowUng Green State University; M.A., Ph.D., New School for Social Research; A.P.C., 

New York University 
Downey, James, P., Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., University of Wisconsin-Stout; Ph.D., Purdue 

University 
Dugan, Robert D., Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., Ohio State University 
Dull, James W., Professor, Political Science 

B.A., Wilkes College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania; M.Phil., Ph.D., Columbia University 
Eikaas, Faith H., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Ellis, Lynn W., Professor, Management 

B.S.E.E., Cornell University; M.S., Stevens Institute of Technology; D.P.S., Pace University 
Faigel, Gleg, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

Ph.D., Moscow Polytechnical Institute 
Faria-Smith, Nancy, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.B.A., St. Bonaventure University; M.B.A., University of Hartford; C.P.A. 
Farrell, Richard J., Lecturer, English 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A. University of Virginia; M.Phil., Yale University 
Ferringer, Natalie S., Professor, Political Science 

B.S., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virgiivia 
Fillebrown, Eleanor E., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., Simmons College; M.B.A., M.S., Drexel University; C.P.A. 
Fischer, Alice, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 
Fish, Andrew J., Jr., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S.E.E., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; M.S., University of Iowa; M.S., St. Mary's 

University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 



Faculty 147 

Flaumenhaft, Frank F., Assistant Professor, Management 

B.S., University of Pennsylvania; M.B.A., New York University 
French, Bruce A., Professor, English 

A.B., University of Missouri; M.A., Western Reserve University; M.A., Middlebury College; 

M.A., Harvard University; Ph.D., New York University 
Frey, Roger G., Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.A., Yale College; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University; J.D., Yale Law School 
Fridshal, Donald, Professor, Mathematics 

B.E.E., M.S., New York University; Ph.D., University of Coimecticut 
Gaensslen, Robert E., Professor, Forensic Science 

B.S., University of Notre Dame; Ph.D., Cornell University 
Garber, Brad T., Professor, Occupational Safety and Health Management 

B.S., M.S., Drexel University; Ph.D., University of CaUfomia, Berkeley 
George, Edward T., Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S., M.S., Worcester Polytechnic Institute; D.Engr., Yale University 
Gere, William S., Jr., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., M.S.I. E., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University 
Glen, Robert A., Professor, History 

B.A., University of Washington; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley 
Golbazi, AH M., Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Detroit Institute of Technology; M.S., Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Gordon, Judith Bograd, Associate Professor, Sociology 

B.A., Brandeis University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan 
Gow, Arthur S., Ill, Assistant Professor, Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

B.A., Muhlenberg College; B.S., B.A., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State 

University 
Greene, Jeffrey, Assistant Professor, English 

B.A., Goddard College; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Houston 
Griscom, Priscilla, Senior Lecturer, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.A., St. John's College; M.A., University of Rhode Island 
Harricharan, Wilfred R., Professor, Management 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Cornell University 
Hoffnung, Robert J., Professor, Psychology 

A.B., Lafayette College; M.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Hosay, Norman, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S., Wayne State University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Hunter, David P., Associate Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., Wagner College; M.P.A., University of New Haven 
Hyman, Arnold, Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Brooklyn College; M.S., City College of New York; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
Jafarian, All A., Associate Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Tehran University; M.S., Pahlavi University; Ph.D., University of Toronto 
Jayaswal, Shakuntala, Assistant Professor, Enghsh 

B.A., Ripon College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
Jewell, Walter, Professor, Sociology and Management 

A.B., Ph.D., Harvard University 
Jones, Richard B., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University 
Kaloyanides, Michael G., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.A., Ph.D., Wesleyan University 



148 

Kaplan, Phillip, Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins 

University 
Karimi, Bijan, Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Aryamehr University of Technology, Iran; M.S., Ph.D., Oklahoma State University 
Katsaros, Thomas, Professor, International Business and Economics 

B.A., M.A., M.B.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Kenig, M. Jerry, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., M.S.M.E., Drexel University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University 
Kirwin, Gerald ]., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Northeastern University; M.S.E.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Ph.D., 

Syracuse University 
Kleinfeld, Ira H., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Eng.Sc.D., Columbia University 
Kublin, Michael, Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Indiana University; M.B.A., Pace University; Ph.D., New York 

University 
Lambrakis, Konstantine C, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.E.E., M.S.M.E., University of Bridgeport; Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 
Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., University of Delaware; M.S., University of New Haven; M.S.C.E., University of 

Connecticut 
L'Heureux-Barrett, Tara, Instructor, Psychology 

B.A., State University of New York College at Pittsburgh; M.A., University of Connecticut 
Maf fee, Edward J., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design; M.A. Columbia University; Ph.D., New York 

University 
Mager, Guillermo E., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.S., M.A., New York University 
Mann, Richard A., Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S.M.E., University of Wisconsin; M.S.M.E., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of 

Wisconsin 
Marks, Joel, Associate Professor, Philosophy 

B.A., Cornell University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Marx, Paul, Professor, English 

B.A., University of Michigan; M.F.A., University of Iowa; Ph.D., New York University 
Maxwell, David A., Professor, Law and Criminal Justice 

B.B.A., University of Miami; M.A., John Jay College; J.D., University of Miami 
McDonald, Robert G., Associate Professor, Accounting 

B.S., City College, New York; M.B.A., New York University; C.M.A., C.I.A., C.F.A., C.P.A. 
McLaughlin, Marilou, Professor, Communication 

B.A., M.A., Villanova University; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin 
McNeill, Gilbert, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Geneva 
Mensz, Fawel, Associate Professor, Quantitative Analysis 

M.S., Warsaw Politechnic; Ph.D., Systems Research Institute of the Polish Academy of 

Sciences 
Mentzer, Thomas L., Professor, Psychology 

B.S., Pennsylvania State University; M.S., Ph.D., Brown University 
Mercilliott, Frederick, Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., M.P.A., John Jay College; M.S., University of New Haven; M.Ph., Ph.D., City University 

of New York; D.A., Western Colorado University 



Faculty 149 

Moffitt, Elizabeth J., Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.F.A., Yale University; M.A. Hunter College 
Montazer, M. Ali, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo 
Moon, Paul R., Associate Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.S., Clarkson University; M.Sc, Ph.D., University of Maiutoba 
Morris, David J., Jr., Associate Professor, Marketing 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
Morris, Michael A., Professor, Psychology 

B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Boston College 
Morrison, Richard C, Professor, Physics 

A.B., Princeton University; M.S., Ph.D., Yale University 
Mottola, Louis, Associate Professor, Management 

B.A., Clarkson CoUege of Technology; M.S., George Washington University; Ph.D., 

University of Northern Colorado 
Nadim, Abbas, Associate Professor, Management 

B.A., Abadan Institute of Technology, Iran; M.B.A., Uruversity of California, Berkeley; 

Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Neal, Judith A., Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.A., M. Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 
Norton, William M., Associate Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.S., Louisiana State Uruversity; M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University; J.D., University of 

Connecticut Law School 
O'Keefe, Daniel C, Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E.E., City University of New York; M.S.E.E., Carnegie-Mellon University; Ph.D., 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 
Okrent, Howard, Associate Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.Sc., University of Califorrua, Los Angeles; S.M., Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of 

Technology 
Orabi, Ismail, Associate Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Helwan University, Egypt; M.S., State University of New York at Buffalo; Ph.D., 

Clarkson University 
Pan, William, Professor, Quantitative Analysis 

B.S., National Cheng Kung University, Taiwan; M.B.A., Auburn University; Ph.D., 

Columbia University 
Parker, Joseph A., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Lehigh University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Oklahoma 
Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Professor, Criminal Justice 

A.B., Bates College; M.Ed., Springfield College; Ph.D., State Uruversity of New York at 

Buffalo 
Farthasarathi, M. N., Director, Materials Technology; Senior Lecturer, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S., Banares Hindu University, India; M.S., Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Penn, Richard L., Jr., Assistant Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., United States Air Force Academy; B.A., University of Maryland; M.A., Central 

Michigan University 
Porter, Oliver, Assistant Professor, Shipbuilding and Marine Technology 

B.S., Central Michigan University; M.A., University of Northern Colorado; M.S., 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Rainish, Robert, Professor, Finance 

B.S., City College, New York; M.B.A., Ph.D., City University of New York 
Raucher, Steven A., Professor, Communication 

B.A., Queens College; M.S., Brooklyn College; Ph.D., Wayne State University 



150 

Robin, Gerald D., Professor, Criminal Justice 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvaiua 
Rolleri, Michael, Assistant Professor, Accounting 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.B.A., University of Connecticut; C.P.A. 
Rosenthal, Erik, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., Queens College, City University of New York; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, 

Berkeley; M.S., State University of New York at Albany 
Ross, Stephen M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E., New York University; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University 
Sachdeva, Baldev K., Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.A., Delhi University; Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University 
Sack, Allen L., Professor, Sociology 

B.A., University of Notre Dame; M.A., Ph.D., Pennsylvaiua State University 
Saleeby, B. Badri, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Cooper Union; M.S.M.E., Ph.D., Northwestern University 
Saliby, Michael, Associate Professor, Chemistry 

B.S., Union College; Ph.D., State University of New York at Binghamton 
Sanders, Matthew S., Assistant Professor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S., M.S., Indiana State University; Ph.D., Texas Tech Uiuversity 
Sandman, Joshua, Professor, Political Science 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., New York University 
Sarris, John, Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.A., Hamilton College; M.S., Ph.D., Tufts University 
Shapiro, Steven J., Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., University of Virginia; M.A., Ph.D., Georgetown University 
Sharma, Ramesh, Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., Banaras Hindu University, India; Ph.D., University of Windsor 
Sherwood, Franklin B., Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Illinois 
Simerson, Gordon R., Associate Professor, Psychology 

B.A., University of Delaware; M.A., Ph.D., Wayne State University 
Sloane, David E. E., Professor, English 

B.A., Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., Duke University 
Smith, Donald C, Associate Professor, Communication 

B.A., Southern Connecticut State University; M.A., Emerson College; Ph.D., University of 

Massachusetts at Amherst 
Smith, Donald M., Associate Professor, English 

A.B., Guilford College; A.M., Columbia University; Ph.D., New York University 
Smith, Warren J., Professor, Management 

B.S., University of Connecticut; M.B.A., Northeastern University 
Sommers, Alexis N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.M.E., Cornell University; M.S., Rutgers University; Ph.D., Purdue University 
Stanley, Richard M., Professor, Mechanical Engineering 

B.E.S., Johns Hopkins University; M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University 
Staugaard, Burton C, Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

A.B., Brown University; M.S., University of Rhode Island; Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Surti, Kantilal K., Professor, Electrical Engineering 

B.E., University of Gujarat, India; M.E.E., University of Delaware; Ph.D., University of 

Connecticut 
Suster, Zeljan, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Belgrade, Yugoslavia 



Faculty 151 

Tedefalk, Edyth, Associate Professor, Management 

B.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., Ph.D., University of North Dakota 
Tedefalk, Rolf K., Professor, Finance 

B.S.B., Ph.D., University of Minnesota; C.F.P., C.F.A. 
Teluk, John J., Professor, Economics 

B.A., Graduate School of Economics, Munich, Germany; B.A., University of New Haven; 

M.A., Free University, Munich, Germany 
Theilman, Ward, Associate Professor, Economics 

B.A., Ph.D., University of lUinois 
Todd, Edmund N., Associate Professor, History 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Tokuz, R. Yucel, Associate Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering 

B.S., M.S., Middle East Technical University, Ankara, Turkey; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University 
Torello, Robert J., Assistant Professor, Management and Quantitative Analysis 

B.A., University of Connecticut; M.S., Southern Connecticut State University; M.B.A., 

University of New Haven 
Tyndall, Bruce, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., M.S., University of Iowa 
Uebelacker, James W., Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., LeMoyne College; M.A., Ph.D., Syracuse University 
van Dyke, Elisabeth, Associate Professor, Tourism and Travel Administration 

B.A., University of California, Los Angeles; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia Uiuversity 
Vieira, Frank, Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., Quinnipiac College; M.S., Southern Connecticut State College 
Vigue, Charles L., Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.A., M.S., University of Maine; Ph.D., North CaroHna State University 
Vitalo, Paul E., Assistant Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., St. Francis College, New York; M.S., Ph.D., Stevens Institute of Technology 
Voegeli, Henry E., Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.A., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island 
Wakin, Shirley, Professor, Mathematics 

B.A., University of Bridgeport; M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 
Wall, David J., Professor, Civil Engineering 

B.S.C.E., M.S.C.E., University of Connecticut; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh 
Walters, Gary, Instructor, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.A., Eastern Connecticut State University; B.A., University of Connecticut; M.S., University 

of New Haven 
Warner, Mark M., Assistant Professor, Hotel and Restaurant Management 

B.A., Monmouth College, Illinois; B.S., Cornell University; M.A., State University of New 

York College at Plattsburgh 
Washington, Dany J., Associate Professor, Professional Studies 

B.S., Bethune-Cookman College; M.A., Columbia University; Ph.D., Southeastern University 
Wentworth, Ronald N., Professor, Industrial Engineering 

B.S.M.E., Northeastern Uiuversity; M.S.I.E., Uruversity of Massachusetts; Ph.D., Purdue 

University 
Werblow, Jack, Professor, Pubhc Administration 

B.A., Cornell University; M.B.A., University of Pennsylvania; Ph.D., University of 

Cincinnati 
Wheeler, George L., Professor, Chemistry 

B.A., CathoHc University of America; Ph.D., University of Maryland 



152 

Whitley, W. Thurmon, Professor, Mathematics 

B.S., Stetson University; M.A., University of North CaroUna at Chapel Hill; Ph.D., Virginia 

Polytechnic Institute and State University 
Williams, Brenda R., Associate Professor, Enghsh 

B.A, Howard University; M.A.Ed., Ph.D., Washington University 
Wnek, Robert £., Associate Professor, Tax Law, Accounting and Business Law 

B.S.A., Villanova University; LL.M., Boston University School of Law; J.D., Delaware Law 

School of Widener College; C.P.A. 
Woodruff, Martha, Assistant Professor, Economics 

B.S., M.A., Murray State University; M.S., University of New Haven 
York, Michael W., Professor, Psychology 

B.A., M.A., Southern Methodist University; Ph.D., Uiuversity of Maryland 
Zajac, Roman N., Assistant Professor, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.S., Tufts University; M.S., Ph.D., University of Connecticut 
Zinser, Jerry T., Assistant Professor, Visual and Performing Arts 

B.F.A., Hartford Art School; M.F.A., Rutgers University 



Faculty 153 

Faculty Professional Licensure and Accreditation 

Bechir, M. Hamdy, Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Horida, Massachusetts, New 

Hampshire, Rhode Island, Vermont, Oklahoma 
Bentivegna, Beverly A., Registered Dietician, American Dietetic Association 
Bockley, William R., Certified Purchasing Manager 
Broderick, Gregory P., EIT, Massachusetts 
Carson, George R., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New York, New 

Jersey; Landscape Architect, Connecticut; Land Surveyor, Connecticut, Massachusetts; 

Professional Planner, New Jersey 
Collura, Michael, Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania 
Dichele, Ernest M., Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut, Massachusetts; Attorney at Law, 

Connecticut, Massachusetts 
Dugan, Robert D., Psychologist, Connecticut; Diplomate in Industrial Psychology of the 

American Board of Professional Psychology 
Faigal, Oleg, Professional Engineer, Connecticut 
Faria-Smith, Nancy, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Fillebrown, Eleanor, Certified PubUc Accountant, New Jersey 
Garber, Brad T., Certified in General Toxicology, Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of 

Industrial Hygiene, Certified Safety Professional 
Hoffnung, Robert J., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 
Hunter, David P., Airline Transportation Rated Pilot, Certified Right Instructor, Certified 

Ground Instructor 
Hyman, Arnold, Consulting Psychologist, Connecticut 
Kenig, M. Jerry, Professional Engineer, Pennsylvania, Michigan 
Kirwin, Gerald J., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, Massachusetts 
Lanius, Ross M., Jr., Professional Engineer, Connecticut, New Jersey 
Mann, Richard A., Professional Engineer, Wisconsin 
Maxwell, David A., Certified Protection Professional 

McDonald, Robert G., Certified Public Accountant, New York; C.M.A.; C.I.A.; C.F.A. 
Mercilliott, Frederick, Certified Protection Professional; Private Investigator, Connecticut 
Norton, William M., Attorney at Law, Connecticut; American Bar Association, Connecticut 

Bar Association 
Parker, Joseph A., Accredited Personnel Specialist 
Parker, L. Craig, Jr., Consulting Psychologist, Wisconsin; Certified Psychologist, Province of 

Alberta, Canada 
Penn, Richard L., Jr., Commercial Pilot, Instrument Rating 
Rolleri, Michael, Certified Public Accountant, Connecticut 
Surti, Kantilal K., Chartered Engineer, United Kingdom 
Tedefalk, Rolf K., Chartered Financial Analyst, Certified Financial Planner 
Tokuz, R. Yucel, Professional Engineer, Ohio 
van Dyke, Elisabeth, Certified Travel Counselor 
Wall, David J., Professional Engineer, Cormecticut, Pennsylvania 
Wnek, Robert E., Certified Public Accountant, Cormecticut; Member of Bar, Connecticut, 

Pennsylvania 
York, Michael W., Clinical Psychologist, Connecticut 



154 

Practitioners-in-Residence 

Balba, Hamdy, Chemistry and Fire Science 

Ph.D., University of CaUfornia, Berkeley 
Coviello, Salvatore, Accounting and Taxation 

B.S., University of Bridgeport; M.S., University of Hartford; C.P.A. 

Associate Chief, Appeals, I.R.S. Regional Counsel 
Culhane, Michael C, Economics 

B.A., Loyola College of the University of Montreal; M.A., Fairfield University; LL.B., 

University of Bridgeport School of Law 
Goodrow, Lloyd S., Criminal Justice 

B.S., St. Michael's College; M.A., State University of New York at Albany; J.D., University of 

Connecticut; Attorney at Law, Connecticut 
Hu, Hui, Industrial Engineering and Computer Science 

B.S., Beijing Teachers College; M.S., Ph.D., Stanford University 
Johnson, William, Fire Science 

M.A., Southern Connecticut State University 
Krause, Leonard A., Occupational Safety and Health 

Sc.D., University of Cincinnati; Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of Industrial 

Hygiene, Certified Safety Professional; Director, Environmental Hygiene and Toxicology, 

Olin Corp. 
Lee, Henry C, Forensic Science 

Ph.D., New York University; Director, Forensic Science Laboratory, State of Connecticut 
Sandel, Susan L., Public Management 

B.A., Barnard College, Columbia University; M.A.; Goddard College; Ph.D., Union 

Graduate School; Certified Fellow, American College of Health Care Administrators; 

Licensed Long-Term Health Care Administrator 
Schwartz, Pauline M., Chemistry and Chemical Engineering 

Ph.D., University of Michigan; Pharmacologist, Veterans Administration Medical Center; 

Associate Research Scientist, Department of Dermatology, Yale University School of 

Medicine 
Smotas, Paul P., Management and Quantitative Analysis 

M.S., Central Connecticut State College 
Tapley, Edward L., Occupational Safety and Health 

B.S., M.S., University of New Haven; Certified in the Comprehensive Practice of Industrial 

Hygiene, Certified Safety Professional 
Turcotte, Margaret M., Management 

B.S., M.B.A., University of New Haven 
Wasielewski, Timothy, Biology and Environmental Science 

B.A., University of Massachusetts; M.S., University of New Haven 



155 



INDEX 



Academic calendar 5 

Academic Advising 23 

Academic honesty and ethics. .17 

Academic policies 17 

Academic probation 19 

Academic programs Usting 3 

Academic records, access 17 

Academic standards 18 

Access to academic records 17 

Accounting 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 38 

Course descriptions (A) 93 

M.S. degree program 35 

Senior professional 

certificate 78 

Accounting information systems 
option, senior professional 

certificate 79 

Accreditation of the 

university 11 

Adding a class 21 

Administration 142 

Admission 

General requirements 13 

Categories 13 

International students 14 

Procedure 13 

Affirmative action 2 

Alumni 30 

Appeals of probation 19 

Applications of psychology, 
senior professional 

certificate 79 

Arson investigation professional 

certificate 85 

Assistantships see Financial aid 

Athletics 29 

Attendance 17 

Auditors 14 

Awarding of degrees 19 

B 

Biology, environmental science 
course descriptions (EN). ..110 

Board of Governors 141 

Bookstore 29 



Business administration, 

master's degree program ...36 

Business administration/ 
industrial engineering dual 
degree program 44 

Business administration/public 
administration dual degree 
program 45 

Business law course 

descriptions (LA) 120 

Business policy and strategy 
Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 39 

c 

Calendar, academic 5 

Campus store 29 

Career development 29 

Certificates, see Senior 

professional certificates and 
professional certificates 
Chemistry course descriptions 

(CH) 98 

City management 

Concentration in the M.P.A. 

program 73 

Civil engineering design 

professional certificate 85 

Civil and environmental 
engineering course 

descriptions (CE) 95 

Commencement 19 

Communication course 

descriptions (CO) 101 

Community psychology 
Concentration in 
community-clinical 

services 46 

Concentration in mental 

retardation services 48 

Concentration in program 

development 48 

M.A. degree program 47 

Comprehensive examinations. 22 
Computer and information 
science 
Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 39 

Concentration in applications 

software 50 

Concentration in 

management information 
systems 50 



Concentration in systems 

software 51 

Course descriptions (CS) ..102 

M.S. degree program 48 

Senior professional certifi- 
cate 79 

Computer center 30 

Computer science, see Computer 
and information science 

Contents 7 

Cooperative education 28 

Counseling 

Academic 23 

Personal 30 

Course descriptions 

Accounting(A) 93 

Biology, environmental 

science (EN) 110 

Business Law (LA) 120 

Chemistry (CH) 98 

Civil and environmental 

engineering (CE) 95 

Communication (CO) 101 

Computer and information 

science (CS) 102 

Criminal justice (CJ) 98 

Doctoral courses 137 

Economics (EC) 106 

Electrical engineering 

(EE) 107 

Environmental engineering 

(CE) 95 

Environmental science 

(EN) 110 

Executive M.B.A. (EXID)...lll 

Finance (H) 112 

Fire science (PS) 114 

History 116 

Hotel & restaurant 

management (HR) 116 

Humanities (HU) 117 

International business (1B)117 
Industrial engineering 

(IE) 117 

Law, business (LA) 120 

Logistics (LG) 120 

Mathematics (M) 121 

Mechanical engineering 

(ME) 122 

Management (MG) 123 

Marketing (MK) 125 

Occupational safety and 

health management 

(SH) 135 

Philosophy (PL) 132 

Physics (PH) 132 



156 



Political science (PS) 132 

Psychology (P) 126 

Public administration 

(PA) 130 

Quantitative analysis 

(QA) 134 

Sociology (SO) 136 

Tourism & travel 

administration (TT) 136 

Criminal justice 

Concentration in correc- 
tional counseling 52 

Concentration in criminal 

justice management 52 

Concentration in security 

management 52 

Course descriptions (CJ) 98 

M.S. degree program 51 

Professional certificate in 

security management ....85 
See also Forensic Science 



D 



Data processing, see Computer 

and information science 
Degree programs, see Programs 
of study 

Development Office 31 

Dining 31 

Disabled student services 34 

Dissertation see Doctoral program 

Diversity policy 23 

Doctoral dissertation 68 

Doctoral program 66 

Dormitory 32 

Dropping a class 21 

Dual degree programs 

M.B.A./M.PA 45 

M.B.A./M.S.I.E 44 



Economics course descriptions 

(EC) 106 

Electrical engineering 

Course descriptions (EE) ..107 

M.S. degree program 53 

Eligibility for financial aid 26 

Employment placement 29 

English Language Workshop 
(E) 106 



Environmental engineering 
Course descriptions (CE)....95 
M.S. degree program 54 

Environmental science 

Course descriptions (EN) .110 
M.S. degree program 55 

Ethics 17 

Executive master of 

business administration 
Course descriptions 

(EXID) Ill 

Degree program 56 

F 

Faculty 145 

Fees 25 

Fellowships (see Financial aid) 
Finance 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 39 

Course descriptions (n)....112 
Senior professional 

certificate 79 

Financial accounting option, 
senior professional 

certificate 78 

Financial aid 26 

Fire science 

Concentration in 

administration 58 

Concentration in 

technology 58 

Course descriptions (FS)...114 

M.S. degree program 57 

Professional certificate in fire 
science administration 

and technology 86 

Food service 31 

Foreign students, see 

International students 
Forensic science 

Concentration in advanced 

investigation 60 

Concentration in 

criminalistics 60 

Concentration in fire 

science 60 

Course descriptions (CJ) 98 

M.S. degree program 59 

Professional certificate in 
forensic science/advanced 

investigation 86 

Professional certificate in 
forensic science/ 
criminalistics 86 



Professional certificate in 
forensic science /fire 

science 87 

Full-time study 20 

FuUy accepted student 13 

G 

General information. Graduate 

School 11 

General management senior 

professional certificate 80 

Grade reports 18 

Grading system 18 

Graduate School ethics 17 

Graduate Student Council 31 

Graduation 19 

Graduation petition 20 

Grievance procedure 23 

H 

Handicapped services 34 

Health care management 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 40 

Concentration in the M.P.A. 

program 74 

Professional certificate 87 

Senior professional 

certificate 80 

Health care marketing 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 41 

Health services 32 

History course descriptions 

(HS) 116 

Hotel & restaurant management 
Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 60 

Course descriptions (HR) .116 
Senior professional 

certificate 81 

Housing 32 

Human resources management 
Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 41 

Senior professional 

certificate 81 

See also 

Industrial/organizational 
psychology, Industrial 
relations and Personnel 
Humanities course descriptions 
(HU) 117 



157 



I 



In-process registration 15 

Incomplete coursework 18 

Independent study 22 

Industrial engineering 

Course descriptions (IE) ...117 

M.B.A./M.S.I.E. dual degree 
program 44 

M.S. degree program 61 

Industrial hygiene 

Concentration in the M.S. in 
occupational safety and 
health management 
program 72 

Professional certificate 88 

Industrial/organizational 

psychology 

M.A. degree program 63 

Industrial relations 

M.S. degree program 65 

Information science, see 

Computer and information 

science 
Institute of Analytical and 

Environmental Chemistry.. 32 
Institute of Computer 

Studies 32 

International business 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 41 

Course descriptions (IB) ...117 

Senior professional 

certificate 81 

International relations 

professional certificate 88 

International students 

Admission 14 

Office 33 



J 



Job placement of students 29 

L 

Law course descriptions 

(LA) 120 

Legal studies professional 

certificate 88 

Library 33 



Logistics 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 42 

Course descriptions (LG)..120 

Professional certificates 89 

Long-term health care 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 42 

Concentration in the M.P.A. 

program 74 

Professional certificate 89 



M 



Make-up policy 17 

M.A. degree programs, see 

Master of arts degree programs 
Management and organization 

Concentiation in the M.B.A. 

program 42 

Management information 

systems, see Computer and 

information science 
Management science 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 43 

Course descriptions (MG) 123 
Majiagement systems 

Sc.D. degree program 66 

Course descriptions 137 

Managerial accounting option, 

accounting senior 

professional certificate 78 

Marketing 

Concentiation in the M.B.A. 
program 43 

Course descriptions (MK) 125 

Senior professional 

certificate 81 

Master of arts degree programs 

Community psychology 46 

Industrial /organizational 

psychology 63 

Master of business 

administration 36 

Master of business 

administiation executive 

degree program 56 

Master of business 

administiation/master of 

science in industrial 

engineering dual degree 44 



Master of business 

administration /master of 
public administration dual 
degree program 45 

Master of public administiation 
degree program 73 

Master of science degree 
programs 

Accounting 35 

Computer and information 

science 48 

Criminal justice 51 

Electrical engineering 53 

Environmental 

engineering 54 

Environmental science 55 

Fire science 57 

Forensic science 59 

Industrial engineering 61 

Industrial relations 65 

Mechanical engineering 69 

Occupational safety and 

health management 70 

Operations research 72 

Taxation 75 

Mathematics course description 
(M) 121 

M.B.A 36 

Mechanical engineering 

Course descriptions (ME). 122 
M.S. degree program 69 

Mental retardation services 
Concentration in the M.A. in 
community psychology 

program 48 

Professional certificate 90 

Minority affairs 33 

M.I.S., see Computer and 
information science 

M.P.A 73 

M.S. degree programs, see 
Master of science degree 
programs 



N 



Non-degree student 14 



o 



Occupational safety 

professional certificate 90 

See also Industrial hygiene 



158 



Occupational safety and health 
management 
Concentration in industrial 

hygiene 72 

Course descriptions (SH)..135 

M.S. degree program 70 

Seruor professional 

certificate 82 

Off-campus locations 11 

Operations research 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 43 

M.S. degree program 72 

P 

Part-time programs 21 

Payment of tuition and fees 25 

Personal counseling 30 

Personnel and labor relations 
Concentration in the M.P.A. 

program 74 

See also Human resources, 
Industrial/organizational 
psychology and industrial 
relations 

Petition for graduation 20 

Philosophy course descriptions 

(PL) 132 

Physically handicapped 

students 34 

Physics course descriptions 

(PH) 132 

Placement of graduates 29 

Political science course 

descriptions (PS) 132 

Prerequisite policy 21 

Probation and appeals 19 

Professional certificates 

Arson investigation 85 

Civil engineering design 85 

Criminal justice/ security 

management 85 

Fire science /ad ministration 

& technology 86 

Forensic science/advanced 

investigation 86 

Forensic science/ 

criminalistics 86 

Forensic science/ 

fire science 87 

Health care management. ...87 
Human resources 

management 87 

Industrial hygiene 88 



International relations 88 

Legal studies 88 

Logistics 89 

Logistics /Advanced 89 

Long-term health care 89 

Mental retardation 

services 90 

Occupational safety 90 

Public administration 90 

Program of study, doctoral 66 

Programs of study, master's 

Accounting 35 

Business administration 36 

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administration/industrial 

engineering dual 

degree 44 

Business 

administration/public 

administration dual 

degree 45 

Community psychology 46 

Computer and information 

science 48 

Criminal justice 51 

Electrical engineering 53 

Environmental 

engineering 54 

Environmental science 55 

Executive master of business 

administration 56 

Fire science 57 

Forensic science 59 

Industrial engineering 61 

Industrial/organizational 

psychology 63 

Industrial relations 65 

Mechanical engineering 69 

Occupational safety and 

health management 70 

Operations research 72 

Public admirustration 73 

Taxation 75 

Provisional acceptance 14 

Psychology 

Applications of psychology, 

senior professional 

certificate 79 

Course descriptions (P) 126 

M.A. degree program, 

community psychology .46 
M.A. degree program, 

industrial/organizational 

psychology 63 



PubUc administration 
Concentration in city 

management 73 

Concentration in health care 

management 74 

Concentration in long-term 

health care 74 

Concentration in personnel 

and labor relations 74 

Course descriptions (PA). .130 
Master's degree program ...73 
M.B.A./M.PA. dual degree 

program 45 

Professional certificate 90 

Public management senior 

professional certificate 82 

Public personnel management 
option, public management 
senior professional 

certificate 83 

Public safety management 
senior professional 

certificate 83 

Public relations 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 

program 44 

Publications 33 



Q 



QPR 19 

Quality point ratio 19 

Quantitative analysis 

Course descriptions (QA).134 
Quantitative techniques in 

marketing option, marketing 

senior professional 

certificate 82 



R 



Radio staHon WNHU 34 

Refunds of tuition 26 

Registration procedures 15 

Repetition of work 19 

Requirements for admission ...13 
Research projects and 

independent study 22 

Residency requirements 20 



159 



Security management 

professional certificate 85 

Senior professional 
certificates 
Accounting 

Accounting information 

systems option 79 

Financial accounting 

option 78 

Managerial accounting 

option 78 

Applications of 

psychology 79 

Computer and information 

science 79 

Finance 79 

General management 80 

Health care management. ...80 
Hotel and restaurant 

management 81 

Human resources manage- 
ment 81 

International business 81 

Marketing 

Marketing option 82 

Quantitative techniques in 

marketing option 82 

Occupational safety and 

health management 82 

Public management 

Survey of the field option... 83 

Public personnel 

management option 83 

Public safety management .83 
Taxation 

Taxation of corporations 

option 83 

Taxation of individuals 

option 83 

Telecommunication 

management 84 

Services for students 29 

Sociology course descriptions 

(SO) 136 

Special student 14 

Student Council, Graduate 31 

Student services 29 

Survey of the field option, 
public management senior 
professional certificate 83 



Taxation 

Corporation taxation 

specialization 76 

M.S. degree program 75 

Public taxation 

specialization 76 

Taxation senior professional 

certificates 83 

Telecommunication 

management senior 

professional certificate 84 

Telecommunications 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 44 

Course descriptions (CO) .101 

Thesis requirements 22 

Time limit for completion of 

degree requirements 20 

Title IX 2 

Tourism and travel 

administration 

Concentration in the M.B.A. 
program 76 

Course descriptions (TT) ..136 

Transfer credit 21 

Tuition and fees 25 



V 



Veterans' affairs 34 



w 



Waiver of courses 21 

Withdrawal from a class 26 

Withdrawal from the 

university 26 

WNHU radio 34 



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